I have looked around online for a while now and found many similar problems but for some reason I can't seem to get this working.

I am just trying to connect to a SQL server database and output the query results to a file - See PowerShell script below. What I am uncertain about is how to integrate the User ID and Password into the connection string.

$SQLServer = "aaaa.database.windows.net"
$SQLDBName = "Database"
$uid ="john"
$pwd = "pwd123"
$SqlQuery = "SELECT * from table;"
$SqlConnection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
$SqlConnection.ConnectionString = "Server = $SQLServer; Database = $SQLDBName; Integrated Security = True; User ID = $uid; Password = $pwd;"
$SqlCmd = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand
$SqlCmd.CommandText = $SqlQuery
$SqlCmd.Connection = $SqlConnection
$SqlAdapter = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataAdapter
$SqlAdapter.SelectCommand = $SqlCmd
$DataSet = New-Object System.Data.DataSet
$SqlAdapter.Fill($DataSet)

$DataSet.Tables[0] | out-file "C:\Scripts\xxxx.csv"

The following error message is received:

Exception calling "Fill" with "1" argument(s): "Windows logins are not supported in this version of SQL Server."

  • What version of SQL are you running? – ne1410s Sep 5 '14 at 9:38
  • sql server management studio 2012 – Johnathan Sep 5 '14 at 9:55
  • Are you trying to connect to a SQL Azure instance? – nabrond Sep 5 '14 at 10:01
  • 1
    SQL Server Management Studio 2012 isn't a "version of SQL" - it's an application that can connect to and manage SQL Server, and it can connect to any version of SQL Server from 2000 (maybe older) through 2014. – alroc Sep 5 '14 at 11:17
up vote 17 down vote accepted

Change Integrated security to false in the connection string.

You can check/verify this by opening up the SQL management studio with the username/password you have and see if you can connect/open the database from there. NOTE! Could be a firewall issue as well.

  • You can check/verify this by opening up the SQL management studio with the username/password you have and see if you can connect/open the database from there. NOTE! Could be a firewall issue as well. – ojk Sep 5 '14 at 9:56

Integrated Security and User ID \ Password authentication are mutually exclusive. To connect to SQL Server as the user running the code, remove User ID and Password from your connection string:

$SqlConnection.ConnectionString = "Server = $SQLServer; Database = $SQLDBName; Integrated Security = True;"

To connect with specific credentials, remove Integrated Security:

$SqlConnection.ConnectionString = "Server = $SQLServer; Database = $SQLDBName; User ID = $uid; Password = $pwd;"
# database Intraction

$SQLServer = "YourServerName" #use Server\Instance for named SQL instances!
$SQLDBName = "YourDBName"
$SqlConnection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
$SqlConnection.ConnectionString = "Server = $SQLServer; Database = $SQLDBName; 
User ID= YourUserID; Password= YourPassword" 
$SqlCmd = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand
$SqlCmd.CommandText = 'StoredProcName'
$SqlCmd.Connection = $SqlConnection 
$SqlAdapter = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataAdapter
$SqlAdapter.SelectCommand = $SqlCmd 
$DataSet = New-Object System.Data.DataSet
$SqlAdapter.Fill($DataSet) 
$SqlConnection.Close() 

#End :database Intraction
clear

Assuming you can use integrated security, you can remove the user id and pass:

$SqlConnection.ConnectionString = "Server = $SQLServer; Database = $SQLDBName; Integrated Security = True;"

The answer are as below for Window authentication

$SqlConnection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
$SqlConnection.ConnectionString = "Server=$SQLServer;Database=$SQLDBName;Integrated Security=True;"

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.