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I have a problem making an algorithm count the sum of digits that were used in a loop.

Let me outline the basic principles :

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 = 9 Digits
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 = 11 Digits

I have try to search for a solution for a bit, but I could not find a solution that would be suitable.

The base idea is that I have a known number n that will represent the end of the digit count. Count begins from 1 so 1 <= n <= 10000.

The first thing that came to my mind was counting the digit amount:

while(numdig != 0) {
    numDig = n/10;
    digCount++;
}

and continue on with a loop in a loop but I found myself confused on the second loop . After that I thought of a cycle that would use a lot of if`s which would be a very incorrect way of solving the problem.

I hope the problem is understandable.
Thank you

  • You have the hard part, iterate the numbers and use you code to count the digits. digCount = 0; for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) { int numDig = i; /*you while loop here*/ } – NetVipeC Sep 5 '14 at 19:26
  • I wonder if there is a simple solution using stringstream – YoungJohn Sep 5 '14 at 19:43
3

Perhaps this will prove useful (separating the digit counting into its own function) in helping you write your program.

/* return the number of digits in the number i */
int ndigits ( int i ) {
    int n = 1;

    if (i < 0) i = -i;
    while (i >= 10) { ++n; i /= 10; }
    return n;
}
  • There would be a way to optimize this over the brute force way of counting the number of digits in each of the numbers. 0-9 each have 1, 10-99 each have 2, 100-999 each have 3, etc. So, if the number is greater than 100, you know you have 9 total for 1-9, plus 1800 for 100-999 (900 numbers times 2 digits each), and so on. – John Hascall Sep 5 '14 at 19:33
  • Thanks, a function might really help in this case – Trimadix Sep 5 '14 at 19:34
  • 1
    Note: this approach fails on a corner case of INT_MIN. To deal with that: if (i > 0) i = -i; while (i <= -10) { ++n; i /= 10; }. +1 anyways – chux Sep 5 '14 at 19:43
  • @chux 1 <= n <= 10000 – BLUEPIXY Sep 5 '14 at 23:13
  • It might be a stupid question, but Im not sure why are we using if (i < 0) i = -i; What error could happen if I didnt put it there? Thanks for the answer :) – Trimadix Sep 7 '14 at 13:58
3

You can try use snprintf( which returns the number of characters that were written). Would be something like:

//read numdig
char buff[6]; // max of 5 digits and the '\0'
digCount += snprintf(buff,6, "%d", numdig);
  • Thanks, I found it very useful :) I never heard about snprintf before – Trimadix Sep 5 '14 at 19:42
  • <cstdio> (<stdio.h>) have some very useful functions for things like this =) – braindf Sep 5 '14 at 19:46
  • Problems 1) Should be snprintf(buff,6, "%d", numdig); or better snprintf(buff,sizeof buff, "%d", numdig); 2) Why so small, maybe char buff[22]; 3) off by one for negative numbers. max of 5 character, not digits, and the '\0' – chux Sep 5 '14 at 19:46
  • I fixed problem #1, thanks. I've just used the right amount of chars for the problem that was proposed and there is no negative numbers ( 1 <= n <= 10000). And I think 'digit' isn't a wrong term as numbers are formed by combination of digits – braindf Sep 5 '14 at 19:53
  • true for the range (1 <= n <= 10000), no negative numbers and buff[6] is sufficient. As others from time-to-time skim through the posts & answers, they do not see the limited usefulness of a given answer. char vs. digit makes sense when considering '-'. My comments part 2 & 3 do not detract from the correctness of your answer for the post's limited range. +1 – chux Sep 6 '14 at 2:27
1

This could be another approach

int getDigitCount ( int val )
{
   stringstream ss;
   ss << val;
   string valstr = ss.str ();
   return valstr.length();
}


int main ( int argc, char** argv )
{
   int n;
   cout << "Enter a number between 1 and 10000 " << endl;
   cin >> n;
   long digitcount = 0;
   for ( int i = 1; i <= n; i ++ )
   {
      digitcount += getDigitCount ( i );
   }

   cout << "Digit Count =" << digitcount << endl;
   return 0;
}

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