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Just starting to play around with Neural Networks for fun after playing with some basic linear regression. I am an English teacher so don't have a math background and trying to read a book on this stuff is way over my head. I thought this would be a better avenue to get some basic questions answered (even though I suspect there is no easy answer). Just looking for some general guidance put in layman's terms. I am using a trial version of an Excel Add-In called NEURO XL. I apologize if these questions are too "elementary."

My first project is related to predicting a student's Verbal score on the SAT based on a number of test scores, GPA, practice exam scores, etc. as well as some qualitative data (gender: M=1, F=0; took SAT prep class: Y=1, N=0; plays varsity sports: Y=1, N=0).

In total, I have 21 variables that I would like to feed into the network, with the output being the actual score (200-800).

I have 9000 records of data spanning many years/students. Here are my questions:

  1. How many records of the 9000 should I use to train the network? 1a. Should I completely randomize the selection of this training data or be more involved and make sure I include a variety of output scores and a wide range of each of the input variables?

  2. If I split the data into an even number, say 9x1000 (or however many) and created a network for each one, then tested the results of each of these 9 on the other 8 sets to see which had the lowest MSE across the samples, would this be a valid way to "choose" the best network if I wanted to predict the scores for my incoming students (not included in this data at all)?

  3. Since the scores on the tests that I am using as inputs vary in scale (some are on 1-100, and others 1-20 for example), should I normalize all of the inputs to their respective z-scores? When is this recommended vs not recommended?

  4. I am predicting the actual score, but in reality, I'm NOT that concerned about the exact score but more of a range. Would my network be more accurate if I grouped the output scores into buckets and then tried to predict this number instead of the actual score?

E.g.

750-800 = 10

700-740 = 9

etc.

Is there any benefit to doing this or should I just go ahead and try to predict the exact score?

  1. What if ALL I cared about was whether or not the score was above or below 600. Would I then just make the output 0(below 600) or 1(above 600)?

    5a. I read somewhere that it's not good to use 0 and 1, but instead 0.1 and 0.9 - why is that?

    5b. What about -1(below 600), 0(exactly 600), 1(above 600), would this work?

    5c. Would the network always output -1, 0, 1 - or would it output fractions that I would then have to roundup or rounddown to finalize the prediction?

  2. Once I have found the "best" network from Question #3, would I then play around with the different parameters (number of epochs, number of neurons in hidden layer, momentum, learning rate, etc.) to optimize this further?

    6a. What about the Activation Function? Will Log-sigmoid do the trick or should I try the other options my software has as well (threshold, hyperbolic tangent, zero-based log-sigmoid).

    6b. What is the difference between log-sigmoid and zero-based log-sigmoid?

Thanks!

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  • You'll have better luck asking this on the stats stackexchange.
    – simonzack
    Sep 6, 2014 at 17:19

1 Answer 1

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First a little bit of meta content about the question itself (and not about the answers to your questions).

I have to laugh a little that you say 'I apologize if these questions are too "elementary."' and then proceed to ask the single most thorough and well thought out question I've seen as someone's first post on SO. I wouldn't be too worried that you'll have people looking down their noses at you for asking this stuff.

This is a pretty big question in terms of the depth and range of knowledge required, especially the statistical knowledge needed and familiarity with Neural Networks. You may want to try breaking this up into several questions distributed across the different StackExchange sites.

Off the top of my head, some of it definitely belongs on the statistics StackExchange, Cross Validated: https://stats.stackexchange.com/

You might also want to try out https://datascience.stackexchange.com/ , a beta site specifically targeting machine learning and related areas.


That said, there is some of this that I think I can help to answer. Anything I haven't answered is something I don't feel qualified to help you with.

Question 1

How many records of the 9000 should I use to train the network? 1a. Should I completely randomize the selection of this training data or be more involved and make sure I include a variety of output scores and a wide range of each of the input variables?

Randomizing the selection of training data is probably not a good idea. Keep in mind that truly random data includes clusters. A random selection of students could happen to consist solely of those who scored above a 30 on the ACT exams, which could potentially result in a bias in your result. Likewise, if you only select students whose SAT scores were below 700, the classifier you build won't have any capacity to distinguish between a student expected to score 720 and a student expected to score 780 -- they'll look the same to the classifier because it was trained without the relevant information.

You want to ensure a representative sample of your different inputs and your different outputs. Because you're dealing with input variables that may be correlated, you shouldn't try to do anything too complex in selecting this data, or you could mistakenly introduce another bias in your inputs. Namely, you don't want to select a training data set that consists largely of outliers. I would recommend trying to ensure that your inputs cover all possible values for all of the variables you are observing, and all possible results for the output (the SAT scores), without constraining how these requirements are satisfied. I'm sure there are algorithms out there designed to do exactly this, but I don't know them myself -- possibly a good question in and of itself for Cross Validated.

Question 3

Since the scores on the tests that I am using as inputs vary in scale (some are on 1-100, and others 1-20 for example), should I normalize all of the inputs to their respective z-scores? When is this recommended vs not recommended?

My understanding is that this is not recommended as the input to a Nerual Network, but I may be wrong.

The convergence of the network should handle this for you. Every node in the network will assign a weight to its inputs, multiply them by their weights, and sum those products as a core part of its computation. That means that every node in the network is searching for some coefficients for each of their inputs. To do this, all inputs will be converted to numeric values -- so conditions like gender will be translated into "0=MALE,1=FEMALE" or something similar.

For example, a node's metric might look like this at a given point in time:

2*ACT_SCORE + 0*GENDER + (-5)*VARISTY_SPORTS ...

The coefficients for each values are exactly what the network is searching for as it converges. If you change the scale of a value, like ACT_SCORE, you just change the scale of the coefficient that will be found by the reciporical of that scaling factor. The result should still be the same.

There are other concerns in terms of accuracy (computers have limited capacity to represent small fractions) and speed that may enter this, but not being familiar with NEURO XL, I can't say whether or not they apply for this technology.

Question 4

I am predicting the actual score, but in reality, I'm NOT that concerned about the exact score but more of a range. Would my network be more accurate if I grouped the output scores into buckets and then tried to predict this number instead of the actual score?

This will reduce accuracy, although you should converge to a solution much faster with fewer possible outputs (scores).

Neural Networks actually describe very high-dimensional functions in their input variables. If you reduce the granularity of that function's output space, you essentially state that you don't care about local minima and maxima in that function, especially around the borders between your output scores. As a result, you are sacrificing information that may be an essential component of the "true" function that you are searching for.


I hope this has been helpful, but you really should break this question down into its many components and ask them separately on different sites -- potentially some of them do belong here on StackOverflow as well.

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