15

In the promise library Q, you can do the following to sequentially chain promises:

var items = ['one', 'two', 'three'];
var chain = Q();
items.forEach(function (el) {
  chain = chain.then(foo(el));
});
return chain;

however, the following doesn't work with $q:

var items = ['one', 'two', 'three'];
var chain = $q();
items.forEach(function (el) {
  chain = chain.then(foo(el));
});
return chain;
37

Redgeoff, your own answer is the way I used to translate an array into a chained series of promises.

The emergent de facto pattern is as follows :

function doAsyncSeries(arr) {
    return arr.reduce(function (promise, item) {
      return promise.then(function(result) {
        return doSomethingAsync(result, item);
      });
    }, $q.when(initialValue));
}

//then
var items = ['x', 'y', 'z'];
doAsyncSeries(items).then(...);

Notes:

  • .reduce is raw javascript, not part of a library.
  • result is the previous async result/data and is included for completeness. The initial result is initialValue. If it's not necessary to pass `result, then simply leave it out.
  • adapt $q.when(initialValue) depending on which promise lib you use.
  • in your case, doSomethingAsync is foo (or what foo() returns?) - in any case, a function.

If you are like me, then the pattern will look, at first sight, like an impenetrable cludge but once your eye becomes attuned, you will start to regard it as an old friend.

Edit

Here's a demo, designed to demonstrate that the pattern recommended above does in fact execute its doSomethingAsync() calls sequentially, not immediately while building the chain as suggested in the comments below.

  • 1
    The original answer was not syntactically correct. I fixed that. Also, what should initialValue be set to? Like the answer above, this will fire all of them simultaneously. – FlavorScape Mar 19 '15 at 23:54
  • @FlavorScape, good catch. It's good to know there are people out there checking this stuff. – Roamer-1888 Mar 20 '15 at 8:57
  • initialValue appears as result in the first iteration of the reduce() loop. It's value depends on the application. If doSomethingAsync() does not need the previous result passed to it, then the reduction initializer would simplify to $q.when() – Roamer-1888 Mar 20 '15 at 9:06
  • 1
    @pulkitsinghal, you might like to read my question Building a promise chain recursively in javascript - memory considerations, which actually starts from a slightly different perspective, but attracted two answers that cover the ground pretty well. – Roamer-1888 Jun 17 '15 at 18:43
  • 1
    Thanks @Roamer-1888 for a concise solution to this problem. – Deniz Jul 16 '15 at 7:03
33

Simply use the $q.when() function:

var items = ['one', 'two', 'three'];
var chain = $q.when();
items.forEach(function (el) {
  chain = chain.then(foo(el));
});
return chain;

Note: foo must be a factory, e.g.

function setTimeoutPromise(ms) {
  var defer = $q.defer();
  setTimeout(defer.resolve, ms);
  return defer.promise;
}

function foo(item, ms) {
  return function() {
    return setTimeoutPromise(ms).then(function () {
      console.log(item);
    });
  };
}

var items = ['one', 'two', 'three'];
var chain = $q.when();
items.forEach(function (el, i) {
  chain = chain.then(foo(el, (items.length - i)*1000));
});
return chain;
  • 4
    This does not work. It executes all of them simultaneously. I know this because I perform a series of requests that take about 500 MS. watching my network traffic, they all go out concurrently (but in order). – FlavorScape Mar 19 '15 at 23:45
  • 1
    Ah, ok making it a factory makes it so that it does not execute immediately in the call stack when we are building the chain, right? – FlavorScape Mar 20 '15 at 0:50
  • How would I know when all promises in chain are succesfully resolved? chain.then or $q.all(chain).then seem not to work – Zbynek Oct 6 '16 at 11:47
  • @Zbynek, at the very end you could use chain.then(function () { console.log('all resolved'); }); – redgeoff Dec 23 '16 at 15:25
  • 1
    Here is a similar solution in a codepen. Essentially uses the same approach as @redgeoff's, but in a nice reusable function, and with the addition of returning the results of all the promises in an array (like $q.all() does). – John Barton Sep 29 '19 at 11:57
4

In perhaps a simpler manner than redgeoff's answer, if you don't need it automated, you can chain promises using $q.when() combined with .then() as shown in the beginning of this post. return $q.when() .then(function(){ return promise1; }) .then(function(){ return promise2; });

  • Does this work if you have in an indeterminate number of promises that need to be resolved sequentially? – Tony Brasunas Apr 4 '19 at 23:40
  • I'm pretty sure you can, I think that's exactly what is happening in redgeoff's answer – Matthias Apr 9 '19 at 0:22
  • yes, it does! I got it to work. I might just be slow, but I think the explanations of the loop on this page aren't as clear as they could be so it took me a while to figure it out. Might make a clarifying answer here if I have the time. But yours was helpful. – Tony Brasunas Apr 10 '19 at 0:58
4
var when = $q.when();

for(var i = 0; i < 10; i++){
    (function() {
         chain = when.then(function() {
        return $http.get('/data');
      });

    })(i); 
}
  • Very elegant !You saved me day :) – user3426603 May 9 '18 at 9:13
4

Having this:

let items = ['one', 'two', 'three'];

One line (well, 3 for readability):

return items
    .map(item => foo.bind(null, item))
    .reduce($q.when, $q.resolve());
2

I prefer preparing functions that will return promises using angular.bind (or Function.prototype.bind) and then linking them into a chain using reduce shortcut. For example

// getNumber resolves with given number
var get2 = getNumber.bind(null, 2);
var get3 = getNumber.bind(null, 3);
[get2, get3].reduce(function (chain, fn) {
   return chain.then(fn);
}, $q.when())
.then(function (value) {
   console.log('chain value =', value);
}).done();
// prints 3 (the last value)
  • Could you elaborate on the benefit of angular.bind in this scenario? – pulkitsinghal Jun 17 '15 at 16:01
  • I used bind to create promise-returning functions that do not need any arguments. Thus can they be just used like .then(foo).then(bar) – gleb bahmutov Jun 18 '15 at 16:18
2

Your answer is correct. However, I thought I'd provide an alternative. You may be interested in $q.serial if you find yourself serially chaining promises often.

var items = ['one', 'two', 'three'];
var tasks = items.map(function (el) {
  return function () { foo(el, (items.length - i)*1000)); });
});

$q.serial(tasks);

function setTimeoutPromise(ms) {
  var defer = $q.defer();
  setTimeout(defer.resolve, ms);
  return defer.promise;
}

function foo(item, ms) {
  return function() {
    return setTimeoutPromise(ms).then(function () {
      console.log(item);
    });
  };
}
  • 1
    This looks interesting, I shall try to refactor after writing a million unit tests on my plate for today... – FlavorScape Apr 6 '15 at 18:47
  • This is definitely a much simpler approach because it is easier to read the code later on. – supersan Feb 18 '17 at 16:06
  • 2
    $q.serial is a non existent doc page – Tony_Henrich Jun 18 '18 at 20:07
  • The link point to some shady website that try to install something. – Claudio Aug 2 '18 at 11:22

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