4

Say i have a constructor, and some instance methods, like

function MyClass(name) {
  this.name = name || '';
}

MyClass.prototype = {
  constructor: MyClass,
  isEmptyName: function() {
    return this.name === '';
  }
}

Now i can write

var myClass = new MyClass('Ben');
myClass.isEmptyName();

which would return false. Now if i make another method what would also return a Boolean

MyClass.prototype = {
  constructor: MyClass,
  isEmptyName: function() {
    return this.name === '';
  }
  longerThan: function(len) {
    return this.name.length > len;
  }
}

i would like to chain these methods like this (somehow, thats my question :) )

myClass.isEmptyName().and.longerThan(2);

Just omit now the '.and.' part. I want the upper statement to finally return a value

false && true -> false

Or a more realistic sample:

myClass.notEmptyName().and.longerThan(4);

To summarize my problem i would say, i want my methods return a boolean value if they are called 'directly' myClass.notEmptyName() should return true, but work like i wrote in the samples, otherwise.

Other libraries do this somehow, but i can't guess how, npm's should is a good example:

user.should.have.property('pets').with.lengthOf(4);
user.pets.should.be.instanceof(Array).and.have.lengthOf(4);

Thanks

  • The only guess i can make, is that should is not working like this, when we are calling .property('xyz') and this is not true, there will be an error thrown, if it pass, it returns this, thats how chaining can be achieved. – Jim-Y Sep 7 '14 at 8:34
  • I suggest you this article of Martin Fowler martinfowler.com/bliki/FluentInterface.html about fluent interface – alessandro Sep 7 '14 at 8:39
2

That's not possible. A method can't return either a boolean or be chainable depending on how it's used later on, because it doesn't know how it will be used later on.

You can chain methods that validate the object in different ways, but you need to get the result at the end if you want to use it in an expression, either by reading a property or calling a method:

function MyClass(name) {
    this.name = name;
    this.and = this;
}

MyClass.prototype = {
    value: true,
    isNotEmpty: function() {
        this.value = this.value && this.name.length > 0; return this;
    },
    isLongerThan: function(len) {
        this.value = this.value && this.name.length > len; return this;
    },
    evaluate: function() {
        return this.value;
    }
};

console.log(new MyClass('Adam').isLongerThan(2).evaluate());
console.log(new MyClass('Bob').isNotEmpty().and.isLongerThan(3).evaluate());

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/Guffa/62e8dLwL/

Edit:

To allow evaluation more than once, you would reset the value in the evaluate method:

    evaluate: function() {
        var v = this.value;
        this.value = true;
        return v;
    }
  • Is there specific reason to use a separate evaluate method? Wouldn't new MyClass('Bob').isNotEmpty().and.isLongerThan(3).value be sufficent? – KooiInc Sep 7 '14 at 10:42
  • @KooiInc: Yes, that works fine. I just used a method as a distinct change from chaining to a value. – Guffa Sep 7 '14 at 10:49
  • your code doesn't work when after one or more iniitial boolean check with a falsy result a boolean check that should return a truthy value is conducted. A long line to say what is demonstrated in jsfiddle.net/KooiInc/qr9ov6ya. I think the solution here would be to use some re-evaluation method. – KooiInc Sep 7 '14 at 14:01
  • @KooiInc: Yes, you can only evaluate the object once. To do it more than once, you would reset the value in the evaluate method. I added code above. – Guffa Sep 7 '14 at 14:24
2

Sure, you can do that. We will define a new intermediate status object, called ChainResult, which remembers the underlying object, the current value, and a pending operation (a function to use to combine the next test). We give this object a valueOf method, so that when JS tries to evaluate it as a primitive, it "looks" like it has a value. To make this work, it turns out that ChainResult actually needs to be a function, and so we hang the necessary properties off the function.

function ChainResult(obj, val) {
    function x() { }
    x.obj = obj;
    x.val = val;
    x.op = null;

    // the `valueOf` function spits out the current value when the object is evaluated
    x.valueOf = function() { return this.val; };

    // the test functions combine the results with the current value
    // using the current operation as set by a preceding `and` or `or`
    x.isEmptyName = function() { 
        x.val = x.op(x.val, x.obj._isEmptyName()); 
        return this; 
    };
    x.isLongerThan = function(len) { 
        x.val = x.op(x.val, x.obj._isLongerThan(len)); 
        return this; 
    };

    // we implement `and` and `or` via getters which set the operation
    // on the ChainResult object, and return `this` so we can keep chaining
    Object.defineProperties(x, {
        and: {
            get: function() { x.op = function(a,b) { return a && b; }; return x; }
        },
        or: {
            get: function() { x.op = function(a,b) { return a || b; }; return x; }
        }
    });

    return x;
}

The MyClass definition needs a bit of tweaking:

function MyClass(name) {
    this.name = name || '';
}

MyClass.prototype = {
    constructor: MyClass,

    // we implement the testers as pseudo-private functions
    _isEmptyName: function() { return this.name === ''; },
    _isLongerThan: function(len) { return this.name.length > len; },

    // when the public tester functions are invoked directly on the object
    // (when they are the first link in the chain), we construct and return a 
    // ChainResult object with the initial value set correctly
    isEmptyName: function() { return ChainResult(this, this._isEmptyName()); },
    isLongerThan: function(len) { return ChainResult(this, this._isLongerThan(len)) }
};

Flow:

new MyClass('Bob')                 // create MyClass object
    .isEmptyName()                 // create ChainResult object with value `false`
    .or                            // remember `or` operation in ChainResult object
    .isLongerThan(2)               // update value of ChainResult object
;                                  // JS tries to convert to scalar, calls valueOf
// true

This needs to be bullet-proofed and tightened up, but you get the idea.

  • Unfortunately ToBoolean (like in an if-condition) doesn't call valueOf(), you need to manually convert. Also, the statement end does not implicitly convert anything. – Bergi Sep 7 '14 at 17:26
  • Btw, when using heavy chaining like this, you should try to use immutable objects – Bergi Sep 7 '14 at 17:28
1

i want my methods return a boolean value if they are called 'directly' myClass.notEmptyName() should return true

Your methods are always called directly on the instance, and would always need to return a primitive boolean value. By that, the context (myClass) is lost and you cannot have an and method (or property getter) on the result.

I would recommend you to have a look at functional programming, partial application and currying, which helps a lot with fluent interfaces like this. Given

function and(fn1, fn2) {
    return function(val) {
        return fn1(val) && fn2(val);
    };
}
function or(fn1, fn2) {
    return function(val) {
        return fn1(val) || fn2(val);
    };
}

function hasEmptyName: function(val) {
    return val.name === '';
}
function hasNameLongerThan: function(len) {
    return function(val) {
        return val.name.length > len;
    };
}

you could write

and(hasEmptyName, hasNameLongerThan(2))(myClass);

Making these functions methods of anything is complicated however. Maybe something like this:

function method(name) {
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
    return function(instance) {
        return instance[name].apply(instance, args);
    };
}
Function.prototype.and = function (fn2) {
    var fn1 = this;
    return function(val) {
        return fn1(val) && fn2(val);
    };
}
Function.prototype.or = function (fn2) {
    var fn1 = this;
    return function(val) {
        return fn1(val) || fn2(val);
    };
}
Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "test", function(pred) {
    return pred(this);
});

Now you could write

myClass.test(method("notEmptyName").and(method("longerThan", 4)));
0

This is an answer (better call it to outcome) for my own question:

Finally i came out with another solution based on the responses in this thread (Thanks guys!) because the original problem can not be solved, since the javascript runtime can't find out wether to return a value, or return itself (the object) when chained. Explanation is messy, sorry :(

Check out my lib, where i have methods like:

check(value).isString() etc..

Originally i wanted to chain these like check(value).isString().and.not.empty() but this, in this way, can not be done. (Challenge me)

Finally i created tokens for chaining, so instead of

check(value).isString().and.not.empty()

I can write

check(value).isstring.and.not.empty.test()

Not nice, but still something.

check.js

For review, visit checkjs on my github repo. Note: README is outdated.

-2

If you use promises, you could write functions that return values and can be chained. Mind you, these are all asynchronous.

Find this JS plugin: Kris Owal's Q, or if you like to use a JS library, they usually contain deferred objects and promises.

  • This question is not about asynchrony. Promises are chainable, but not the foundation of chaining. – Bergi Sep 7 '14 at 14:31
  • @Bergi No, but it's about how to execute methods standalone or in a row, where the last one takes returned value from the former. I offered a solution for that. – Design by Adrian Sep 7 '14 at 14:48
  • Yes, it's about chaining. Promises are not a solution for chaining. Please provide a code example for the OP's test case if you think otherwise. – Bergi Sep 7 '14 at 14:54

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