8

I'm trying to implement a lock free multiple producer, multiple consumer queue in C++11. I'm doing this as a learning exercise, so I'm well aware that I could just use an existing open source implementation, but I'd really like to find out why my code doesn't work. The data is stored in a ringbuffer, apparently it is a "bounded MPMC queue".

I've modelled it pretty closely to what I've read of Disruptor. The thing I've noticed is that it works absolutely fine with a single consumer and single/multiple producers, it's just multiple consumers which seems to break it.

Here's the queue:

    template <typename T>
class Queue : public IQueue<T>
{
public:
    explicit Queue( int capacity );
    ~Queue();

    bool try_push( T value );
    bool try_pop( T& value );
private:
    typedef struct
    {
        bool readable;
        T value;
    } Item;

    std::atomic<int> m_head;
    std::atomic<int> m_tail;
    int m_capacity;
    Item* m_items;
};

template <typename T>
Queue<T>::Queue( int capacity ) :
m_head( 0 ),
m_tail( 0 ),
m_capacity(capacity),
m_items( new Item[capacity] )
{
    for( int i = 0; i < capacity; ++i )
    {
        m_items[i].readable = false;
    }
}

template <typename T>
Queue<T>::~Queue()
{
    delete[] m_items;
}

template <typename T>
bool Queue<T>::try_push( T value )
{
    while( true )
    {
        // See that there's room
        int tail = m_tail.load(std::memory_order_acquire);
        int new_tail = ( tail + 1 );
        int head = m_head.load(std::memory_order_acquire);

        if( ( new_tail - head ) >= m_capacity )
        {
            return false;
        }

        if( m_tail.compare_exchange_weak( tail, new_tail, std::memory_order_acq_rel ) )
        {
            // In try_pop, m_head is incremented before the reading of the value has completed,
            // so though we've acquired this slot, a consumer thread may be in the middle of reading
            tail %= m_capacity;

            std::atomic_thread_fence( std::memory_order_acquire );
            while( m_items[tail].readable )
            {
            }

            m_items[tail].value = value;
            std::atomic_thread_fence( std::memory_order_release );
            m_items[tail].readable = true;

            return true;
        }
    }
}

template <typename T>
bool Queue<T>::try_pop( T& value )
{
    while( true )
    {
        int head = m_head.load(std::memory_order_acquire);
        int tail = m_tail.load(std::memory_order_acquire);

        if( head == tail )
        {
            return false;
        }

        int new_head = ( head + 1 );

        if( m_head.compare_exchange_weak( head, new_head, std::memory_order_acq_rel ) )
        {
            head %= m_capacity;

            std::atomic_thread_fence( std::memory_order_acquire );
            while( !m_items[head].readable )
            {
            }

            value = m_items[head].value;
            std::atomic_thread_fence( std::memory_order_release );
            m_items[head].readable = false;

            return true;
        }
    }
}

And here's the test I'm using:

void Test( std::string name, Queue<int>& queue )
{
    const int NUM_PRODUCERS = 64;
    const int NUM_CONSUMERS = 2;
    const int NUM_ITERATIONS = 512;
    bool table[NUM_PRODUCERS*NUM_ITERATIONS];
    memset(table, 0, NUM_PRODUCERS*NUM_ITERATIONS*sizeof(bool));

    std::vector<std::thread> threads(NUM_PRODUCERS+NUM_CONSUMERS);

    std::chrono::system_clock::time_point start, end;
    start = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

    std::atomic<int> pop_count (NUM_PRODUCERS * NUM_ITERATIONS);
    std::atomic<int> push_count (0);

    for( int thread_id = 0; thread_id < NUM_PRODUCERS; ++thread_id )
    {
        threads[thread_id] = std::thread([&queue,thread_id,&push_count]()
                                 {
                                     int base = thread_id * NUM_ITERATIONS;

                                     for( int i = 0; i < NUM_ITERATIONS; ++i )
                                     {
                                         while( !queue.try_push( base + i ) ){};
                                         push_count.fetch_add(1);
                                     }
                                 });
    }

    for( int thread_id = 0; thread_id < ( NUM_CONSUMERS ); ++thread_id )
    {
        threads[thread_id+NUM_PRODUCERS] = std::thread([&]()
                                         {
                                             int v;

                                             while( pop_count.load() > 0 )
                                             {
                                                 if( queue.try_pop( v ) )
                                                 {
                                                     if( table[v] )
                                                     {
                                                         std::cout << v << " already set" << std::endl;
                                                     }
                                                     table[v] = true;
                                                     pop_count.fetch_sub(1);
                                                 }
                                             }
                                         });

    }

    for( int i = 0; i < ( NUM_PRODUCERS + NUM_CONSUMERS ); ++i )
    {
        threads[i].join();
    }

    end = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
    std::chrono::duration<double> duration = end - start;

    std::cout << name << " " << duration.count() << std::endl;

    std::atomic_thread_fence( std::memory_order_acq_rel );

    bool result = true;
    for( int i = 0; i < NUM_PRODUCERS * NUM_ITERATIONS; ++i )
    {
        if( !table[i] )
        {
            std::cout << "failed at " << i << std::endl;
            result = false;
        }
    }
    std::cout << name << " " << ( result? "success" : "fail" ) << std::endl;
}

Any nudging in the right direction would be greatly appreciated. I'm pretty new to memory fences rather than just using a mutex for everything, so I'm probably just fundamentally misunderstanding something.

Cheers J

  • 4
    You should add to your description that you're building a bounded MPMC queue. That's a pretty important aspect. – Kerrek SB Sep 7 '14 at 11:11
  • I'd never heard that term before, thanks =) – Joe Sep 7 '14 at 11:34
  • I don't like the asymmetry in thread fence acquire/release. You sure that is correct? – LumpN Sep 7 '14 at 15:15
  • @LumpN which asymmetry do you mean? – Joe Sep 7 '14 at 17:40
  • 3
    To quote Yakk: "The proper way to approach a lock free data structure is to write a semi formal proof that your design works in pseudo code. You shouldn't be asking "is this lock free code thread safe", but rather "does my proof that this lock free code is thread safe have any errors?"" These things are notoriously difficult to get right. I suggest looking at an existing implementation to get some ideas how difficult it actually is (caveats etc.) and then start proofing. – dyp Sep 7 '14 at 20:38
10

I'd give a look to Moody Camel's implementation.

It is a fast general purpose lock-free queue for C++ entirely written in C++11. Documentation seems to be rather good along with a few performance tests.

Among all other interesting things (they're worth a read anyway), it's all contained in a single header, and available under the simplified BSD license. Just drop it in your project and enjoy!

  • Good find, thanks :) – Joe Nov 2 '15 at 8:57
  • Well, not a single header, it's two files... – einpoklum Apr 30 '18 at 12:48
  • The second header file is for the blocking version. – EnzoR May 4 '18 at 6:22
2

The simplest approach uses a circular buffer. That is it's like an array of 256 elements and you use uint8_t as index so it wraps around and starts at beginning when you overflow it.

The simplest primitive you can build upon is when you have single producer, single consumer thread.

The buffer has two heads:

  • Write head: It points the element which will be written next.
  • Read head: It points to the element which will be read next.

Operation of the producer:

  1. If write Head + 1 == read head, the buffer is full, return buffer full error.
  2. Write content to the element.
  3. Insert memory barrier to sync CPU cores.
  4. Move the write head forward.

At the buffer full case there is still 1 room left, but we reserve that, to distinguish from the buffer empty case.

Operation of the consumer:

  1. If read head == write head, the buffer is empty, return buffer empty error.
  2. Read content of the element.
  3. Insert memory barrier to sync CPU cores.
  4. Move the read head forward.

The producer owns the write head, the consumer owns the read head, there is no concurrency on those. Also the heads are updated when the operation is completed, this ensure the consumer leaves finished elements behind, and the consumes leaves behind fully consumed empty cells.

Create 2 of these pipes in both directions whenever you fork off a new thread and you can have bidirectional communication with your threads.

Given that we are talking about lock freeness it also means none of the threads are blocked, when there is nothing to do the threads are spinning empty, you may want to detect this and add some sleep when it happens.

  • Indeed creating a pair of spsc queues between each pair of threads who need to communicate is the easiest, and often more performant than a single mpmc queue when under high contention. There are reasons you'd need multi-consumer at least, such as job stealing. This was my writeup of this whole rabbit hole if you're at all interested: codersblock.org/blog/2016/6/02/ditching-the-mutex – Joe May 10 '18 at 20:46
0

How about this lock free queue

It is memory ordering lock free queue, but this need to pre-set number of current thread when init the queue.

For example:-

int* ret;
int max_concurrent_thread = 16;
lfqueue_t my_queue;

lfqueue_init(&my_queue, max_concurrent_thread );

/** Wrap This scope in other threads **/
int_data = (int*) malloc(sizeof(int));
assert(int_data != NULL);
*int_data = i++;
/*Enqueue*/
 while (lfqueue_enq(&my_queue, int_data) == -1) {
    printf("ENQ Full ?\n");
}

/** Wrap This scope in other threads **/
/*Dequeue*/
while  ( (int_data = lfqueue_deq(&my_queue)) == NULL) {
    printf("DEQ EMPTY ..\n");
}

// printf("%d\n", *(int*) ret );
free(ret);
/** End **/

lfqueue_destroy(&my_queue);

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