105

I have a list

[[12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0]]

I want to count the frequency of each element in this list. Something like

freq[[12,6]] = 40

In R this can be obtained with the table function. Is there anything similar in python3?

1

7 Answers 7

225

Pandas has a built-in function called value_counts().

Example: if your DataFrame has a column with values as 0's and 1's, and you want to count the total frequencies for each of them, then simply use this:

df.colName.value_counts()
4
  • 31
    This should really be the top answer.
    – Max Power
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 22:26
  • 19
    value_counts is a method of the class ´pandas.Series´, not pandas.DataFrame. It only counts from columns, not dataframes, unlike the R table function.
    – Jacquot
    Commented Jan 24, 2018 at 14:24
  • Thank you! I forgot to scroll down; I've previously upvoted this answer but I forgot! Commented Jan 3, 2019 at 17:04
  • 4
    Use df.colName.value_counts(dropna=False) to include NaN (missing value count).
    – vasili111
    Commented Jan 22, 2020 at 18:46
47

Supposing you need to convert the data to a pandas DataFrame anyway, so that you have

L = [[12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0]]
df = pd.DataFrame(L, columns=('a', 'b'))

then you can do as suggested in this answer, using groupby.size():

tab = df.groupby(['a', 'b']).size()

tab looks as follows:

In [5]: tab
Out[5]:
a   b
0   6    19
6   0    20
12  0    33
    6    28
dtype: int64

and can easily be changed to a table form with unstack():

In [6]: tab.unstack()
Out[6]:
b      0     6
a
0    NaN  19.0
6   20.0   NaN
12  33.0  28.0

Fill NaNs and convert to int at your own leisure!

4
  • 15
    THIS is functionally equivalent to the R table function.
    – Jacquot
    Commented Jan 24, 2018 at 14:25
  • 1
    This is exactly what I was looking for.
    – Thomas
    Commented Sep 26, 2018 at 9:52
  • i tried using dropna = False in groupby() to include the NaNs, but it doesn't work. How else could the NaNs be included in the table? Commented Apr 7, 2021 at 7:02
  • @Ankhnesmerira can you provide a failing example? Inserting a float("nan") in L and using df.groupby(['a', 'b'], dropna=False).size() works fine On My Machine(tm) :-) Commented Apr 21, 2021 at 14:25
45

A Counter object from the collections library will function like that.

from collections import Counter

x = [[12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0]]

# Since the elements passed to a `Counter` must be hashable, we have to change the lists to tuples.
x = [tuple(element) for element in x]

freq = Counter(x)

print freq[(12,6)]

# Result:  28
31
import pandas
x = [[12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0]] 
ps = pandas.Series([tuple(i) for i in x])
counts = ps.value_counts()
print counts

you will get the result like:

(12, 0)    33
(12, 6)    28
(6, 0)     20
(0, 6)     19

and for [(12,6)] you will get exact number, here 28

more about pandas, which is powerful Python data analysis toolkit, you can read in official doc: http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/

UPDATE:

If order does not matter just use sorted: ps = pandas.Series([tuple(sorted(i)) for i in x]) after that result is:

(0, 6)     39
(0, 12)    33
(6, 12)    28
4
  • is there an easy way with pandas to consider equal permutation of elements? [12,0] = [0,12] ?
    – Donbeo
    Commented Sep 7, 2014 at 14:09
  • @Donbeo see update. Sorted should be easiest way to do it ;-)
    – andilabs
    Commented Sep 7, 2014 at 14:20
  • set is ok if you accept removing of repetitions. as far as you don't care about difference between [0,1,1] and [0,1] using set is ok.
    – andilabs
    Commented Sep 7, 2014 at 14:30
  • 1
    Use df.colName.value_counts(dropna=False) to include NaN (missing value count).
    – vasili111
    Commented Jan 22, 2020 at 18:46
18

IMHO, pandas offers a better solution for this "tabulation" problem:

One dimension:

my_tab = pd.crosstab(index = df["feature_you_r_interested_in"],
                              columns="count")

Proportion count:

my_tab/my_tab.sum()

Two-dimensions (with totals):

cross = pd.crosstab(index=df["feat1"], 
                             columns=df["feat2"],
                             margins=True)

cross

Also, as mentioned by other coleagues, pandas value_counts method could be all you need. It is so good that you can have the counts as percentages if you want:

df['your feature'].value_counts(normalize=True)

I'm very grateful for this blog:

http://hamelg.blogspot.com.br/2015/11/python-for-data-analysis-part-19_17.html

2
  • The link doesn't work. This one does: hamelg.blogspot.com/2015/11/…
    – Ivo Fugers
    Commented Jun 7, 2018 at 12:35
  • 1
    Thanks for your first solution! By the way, you can use the argument normalize='columns' in crosstab to get proportion count.
    – igorkf
    Commented Jan 9, 2021 at 17:03
10

In Numpy, the best way I've found of doing this is to use unique, e.g:

import numpy as np

# OPs data
arr = np.array([[12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0]])

values, counts = np.unique(arr, axis=0, return_counts=True)

# into a dict for presentation
{tuple(a):b for a,b in zip(values, counts)}

giving me: {(0, 6): 19, (6, 0): 20, (12, 0): 33, (12, 6): 28} which matches the other answers

This example is a bit more complicated than I normally see, and hence the need for the axis=0 option, if you just want unique values everywhere, you can just miss that out:

# generate random values
x = np.random.negative_binomial(10, 10/(6+10), 100000)

# get table
values, counts = np.unique(x, return_counts=True)

# plot
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
plt.vlines(values, 0, counts, lw=2)

matplotlib output

R seems to make this sort of thing much more convenient! The above Python code is just plot(table(rnbinom(100000, 10, mu=6))).

0

You can probably do a 1-dimensional count with list comprehension.

L = [[12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [0, 6], [12, 0], [0, 6], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 6], [12, 6], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [0, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [12, 0], [12, 6], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 6], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [12, 0], [6, 0], [6, 0]]
countey = [tuple(x) for x in L]
freq = {x:countey.count(x) for x in set(countey)}

In [2]: %timeit {x:countey.count(x) for x in set(countey)}
        100000 loops, best of 3: 15.2 µs per loop   

In [4]: print(freq)
Out[4]: {(0, 6): 19, (6, 0): 20, (12, 0): 33, (12, 6): 28}

In [5]: print(freq[(12,6)])
Out[5]: 28

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