8

I have a design that requires values to be contained at certain bits inside of a 32 bit word. Example being bits 10-15 must hold value 9, with the remaining bits all being 0. So for simplicity/readability I created a struct that contains a broken down version of what is asked.

struct {
    int part1 : 10;
    int part2 : 6;
    int part3 : 16;
} word;

I can then set part2 to be equal to whatever value is requested, and set the other parts as 0.

word.part1 = 0; 
word.part2 = 9;
word.part3 = 0;

I now want to take that struct, and convert it into a single 32 bit integer. I do have it compiling by forcing the casting, but it does not seem like a very elegant or secure way of converting the data.

int x = *reinterpret_cast<int*>(&word);

If I try to cast it just as a normal reinterpret_cast<int>(word) I get the following error:

invalid cast from type 'ClassName::<anonymous struct>' to type 'int'

There must be a better way of doing this, I just can not figure it out. Thanks in advance!

Note: Must be done in c++ style casting, because of standards and whatnot... eye roll

  • 1
    Yeah, now that I no longer work for IBM, I'd just use a union. (Couldn't mention the U-word in IBM, ya know.) – Hot Licks Sep 8 '14 at 23:20
  • 3
    Note that it is not defined where those bitfields are inside the int, only the number of bits that they take. – Mooing Duck Sep 8 '14 at 23:25
  • @HotLicks Yeah it is not IBM, but definitely a place that has similar views :) – MZimmerman6 Sep 8 '14 at 23:57
6
union Ints {
  struct {
    int part1 : 10;
    int part2 : 6;
    int part3 : 16;
 } word;
 uint32_t another_way_to_access_word;
};

may help

  • I vaguely recall there's some weasel-wording in the standard that unions can have "undocumented behavior", but the above should work with any reasonable compiler. – Hot Licks Sep 8 '14 at 23:21
  • @HotLicks: There is weasel wording, but nobody cares. – Mooing Duck Sep 8 '14 at 23:25
  • @MooingDuck: People took that attitude toward undefined behavior in the past. Then a compiler upgrade turned their "should work with any reasonable compiler" code into security holes. – Ben Voigt Sep 8 '14 at 23:28
  • @BenVoigt and the people responded by blaming the compiler writers – M.M Sep 8 '14 at 23:34
  • FWIW this is not UB in C11, which specifically says that union aliasing overrides the strict aliasing rule (C++11 doesn't say that). But it's not clear to me whether this code violates C++ strict aliasing or not. (It's permitted to alias int as unsigned int, but I'm not sure if the int being a bitfield changes that) – M.M Sep 8 '14 at 23:35
3

The attempt reinterpret_cast<int>(word) does not work because there is no conversion operator defined between your user-defined struct type and int.

You could add a conversion operator to your struct, or preferably IMHO a named function to do the conversion, e.g.:

struct {
    uint32_t part1 : 10;
    uint32_t part2 : 6;
    uint32_t part3 : 16;

    uint32_t get_all_parts() const
    {
         return (part1 << 22) + (part2 << 16) + part3;
    }
} word;

Note, I used unsigned ints as they have well-defined behaviour on left shifting.

  • That would work as well, but I was looking for something that I did not have to write small subfunctions like your get_all_parts code b/c this has to be done many times. My values are actually unsigned ints in actual (not simplified) code, but I removed that for simplicity sake – MZimmerman6 Sep 9 '14 at 0:00
  • 1
    so add a conversion operator instead. – Captain Obvlious Sep 9 '14 at 0:22
3
typedef struct word {
  uint32_t part1 : 10;
  uint32_t part2 : 6;
  uint32_t part3 : 16;

  operator int(){
    return (part1 << 22) + (part2 << 16) + part3;
  }

  struct word operator=(int i){
    this->set(i);
    return *this;
  }

  void set(int i){
    part1 = (0xFFFF0000 & i) >> 16;
    part2 = (0x0000FC00 & i) >> 10;
    part3 = (0x000003FF & i);
  }

  word(int i){
    this->set(i);
  }
} word;

That should do it.

struct word myword = 20;
struct word second_word(50);

myword = 10;
second_word.set(50);

int x = myword;
iny y = second_word;

Note: I tested this. It compiles perfectly. And runs perfectly.

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