We have a big table with a lot of columns. After we moved to MySQL Cluster, the table cannot be created because of:

ERROR 1118 (42000): Row size too large. The maximum row size for the used table type, not counting BLOBs, is 14000. This includes storage overhead, check the manual. You have to change some columns to TEXT or BLOBs

As an example:

@Entity @Table (name = "appconfigs", schema = "myproject")
public class AppConfig implements Serializable
{
    @Id @Column (name = "id", nullable = false)
    @GeneratedValue (strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
    private int id;

    @OneToOne @JoinColumn (name = "app_id")
    private App app;

    @Column(name = "param_a")
    private ParamA parama;

    @Column(name = "param_b")
    private ParamB paramb;
}

It's a table for storing configuration parameters. I was thinking that we can combine some columns into one and store it as JSON object and convert it to some Java object.

For example:

@Entity @Table (name = "appconfigs", schema = "myproject")
public class AppConfig implements Serializable
{
    @Id @Column (name = "id", nullable = false)
    @GeneratedValue (strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
    private int id;

    @OneToOne @JoinColumn (name = "app_id")
    private App app;

    @Column(name = "params")
    //How to specify that this should be mapped to JSON object?
    private Params params;
}

Where we have defined:

public class Params implements Serializable
{
    private ParamA parama;
    private ParamB paramb;
}

By using this we can combine all columns into one and create our table. Or we can split the whole table into several tables. Personally I prefer the first solution.

Anyway my question is how to map the Params column which is text and contains JSON string of a Java object?

  • If you have many configuration parameters, just use plain table with 2 columns: key and value and load it to map. If you want to store params as JSON or XML, just store/read it as Text and convert later. – user1516873 Sep 9 '14 at 7:37
  • @Rad does this help you – Ankur Singhal Sep 9 '14 at 7:51
  • @user1516873 we considered this as the final solution. If I'm not mistaken, it increases the complexity while one tries to modify the data. Thanks anyway. – Rad Sep 9 '14 at 8:30
  • @ankur-singhal, I'm not sure. We are using MySQL cluster with NDBCluster engine for our tables. Is it still applicable? – Rad Sep 9 '14 at 8:31
up vote 34 down vote accepted

You can use a JPA converter to map your Entity to the database. Just add an annotation similar to this one to your params field:

@Convert(converter = JpaConverterJson.class)

and then create the class in a similar way (this converts a generic Object, you may want to specialize it):

public class JpaConverterJson implements AttributeConverter<Object, String> {

  private final static ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper();

  @Override
  public String convertToDatabaseColumn(Object meta) {
    try {
      return objectMapper.writeValueAsString(meta);
    } catch (JsonProcessingException ex) {
      return null;
      // or throw an error
    }
  }

  @Override
  public Object convertToEntityAttribute(String dbData) {
    try {
      return objectMapper.readValue(dbData, Object.class);
    } catch (IOException ex) {
      // logger.error("Unexpected IOEx decoding json from database: " + dbData);
      return null;
    }
  }

}

That's it: you can use this class to serialize any object to json in the table.

  • Note: This solution does not work if you are also using Hibernate Envers and a Hibernate version less than 5 (which isn't out yet at time of writing). See HHH-9042. – Flavin Apr 26 '16 at 19:49
  • If the json stored in the DB is an array, meaning something like: [{...},{...},{...}], will the converter throw an exception or will the mapper handle it? – Norbert Bicsi Jan 29 at 8:11
  • Excellent it worked with hibernate ymanager core/entitymanager of 4.3.6 version itself. – Kanagavelu Sugumar Feb 1 at 7:16

As I explained in this article, the JPA AttributeConverter is way too limited to map JSON object types, especially if you want to save them as JSON binary.

You don’t have to create all these types manually, you can simply get them via Maven Central using the following dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.vladmihalcea</groupId>
    <artifactId>hibernate-types-52</artifactId>
    <version>${hibernate-types.version}</version> 
</dependency> 

For more info, check out the hibernate-types open-source project.

Now, to explain how it all works.

I wrote an article about how you can map JSON objects on both PostgreSQL and MySQL.

For PostgreSQL, you need to send the JSON object in a binary form:

public class JsonBinaryType
    extends AbstractSingleColumnStandardBasicType<Object> 
    implements DynamicParameterizedType {

    public JsonBinaryType() {
        super( 
            JsonBinarySqlTypeDescriptor.INSTANCE, 
            new JsonTypeDescriptor()
        );
    }

    public String getName() {
        return "jsonb";
    }

    @Override
    public void setParameterValues(Properties parameters) {
        ((JsonTypeDescriptor) getJavaTypeDescriptor())
            .setParameterValues(parameters);
    }

}

The JsonBinarySqlTypeDescriptor looks like this:

public class JsonBinarySqlTypeDescriptor
    extends AbstractJsonSqlTypeDescriptor {

    public static final JsonBinarySqlTypeDescriptor INSTANCE = 
        new JsonBinarySqlTypeDescriptor();

    @Override
    public <X> ValueBinder<X> getBinder(
        final JavaTypeDescriptor<X> javaTypeDescriptor) {
        return new BasicBinder<X>(javaTypeDescriptor, this) {
            @Override
            protected void doBind(
                PreparedStatement st, 
                X value, 
                int index, 
                WrapperOptions options) throws SQLException {
                st.setObject(index, 
                    javaTypeDescriptor.unwrap(
                        value, JsonNode.class, options), getSqlType()
                );
            }

            @Override
            protected void doBind(
                CallableStatement st, 
                X value, 
                String name, 
                WrapperOptions options)
                    throws SQLException {
                st.setObject(name, 
                    javaTypeDescriptor.unwrap(
                        value, JsonNode.class, options), getSqlType()
                );
            }
        };
    }
}

and the JsonTypeDescriptor like this:

public class JsonTypeDescriptor
        extends AbstractTypeDescriptor<Object> 
        implements DynamicParameterizedType {

    private Class<?> jsonObjectClass;

    @Override
    public void setParameterValues(Properties parameters) {
        jsonObjectClass = ( (ParameterType) parameters.get( PARAMETER_TYPE ) )
            .getReturnedClass();

    }

    public JsonTypeDescriptor() {
        super( Object.class, new MutableMutabilityPlan<Object>() {
            @Override
            protected Object deepCopyNotNull(Object value) {
                return JacksonUtil.clone(value);
            }
        });
    }

    @Override
    public boolean areEqual(Object one, Object another) {
        if ( one == another ) {
            return true;
        }
        if ( one == null || another == null ) {
            return false;
        }
        return JacksonUtil.toJsonNode(JacksonUtil.toString(one)).equals(
                JacksonUtil.toJsonNode(JacksonUtil.toString(another)));
    }

    @Override
    public String toString(Object value) {
        return JacksonUtil.toString(value);
    }

    @Override
    public Object fromString(String string) {
        return JacksonUtil.fromString(string, jsonObjectClass);
    }

    @SuppressWarnings({ "unchecked" })
    @Override
    public <X> X unwrap(Object value, Class<X> type, WrapperOptions options) {
        if ( value == null ) {
            return null;
        }
        if ( String.class.isAssignableFrom( type ) ) {
            return (X) toString(value);
        }
        if ( Object.class.isAssignableFrom( type ) ) {
            return (X) JacksonUtil.toJsonNode(toString(value));
        }
        throw unknownUnwrap( type );
    }

    @Override
    public <X> Object wrap(X value, WrapperOptions options) {
        if ( value == null ) {
            return null;
        }
        return fromString(value.toString());
    }

}

Now, you need to declare the new type on either class level or in a package-info.java package-level descriptior:

@TypeDef(name = "jsonb", typeClass = JsonBinaryType.class)

And the entity mapping will look like this:

@Type(type = "jsonb")
@Column(columnDefinition = "json")
private Location location;

If you're using Hibernate 5 or later, then the JSON type is registered automatically by Postgre92Dialect.

Otherwise, you need to register it yourself:

public class PostgreSQLDialect extends PostgreSQL91Dialect {

    public PostgreSQL92Dialect() {
        super();
        this.registerColumnType( Types.JAVA_OBJECT, "json" );
    }
}

I had a similar problem, and solved it by using @Externalizer annotation and Jackson to serialize/deserialize data (@Externalizer is OpenJPA-specific annotation, so you have to check with your JPA implementation similar possibility).

@Persistent
@Column(name = "params")
@Externalizer("toJSON")
private Params params;

Params class implementation:

public class Params {
    private static final ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();

    private Map<String, Object> map;

    public Params () {
        this.map = new HashMap<String, Object>();
    }

    public Params (Params another) {
        this.map = new HashMap<String, Object>();
        this.map.putAll(anotherHolder.map);
    }

    public Params(String string) {
        try {
            TypeReference<Map<String, Object>> typeRef = new TypeReference<Map<String, Object>>() {
            };
            if (string == null) {
                this.map = new HashMap<String, Object>();
            } else {
                this.map = mapper.readValue(string, typeRef);
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            throw new PersistenceException(e);
        }
    }

    public String toJSON() throws PersistenceException {
        try {
            return mapper.writeValueAsString(this.map);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            throw new PersistenceException(e);
        }
    }

    public boolean containsKey(String key) {
        return this.map.containsKey(key);
    }

    // Hash map methods
    public Object get(String key) {
        return this.map.get(key);
    }

    public Object put(String key, Object value) {
        return this.map.put(key, value);
    }

    public void remove(String key) {
        this.map.remove(key);
    }

    public Object size() {
        return map.size();
    }
}

HTH

  • Thanks for your answer. We use "spring-data-jpa". As maven says it depends on org.eclipse.persistence, and org.hibernate for JPA. Is it what you noted? – Rad Sep 9 '14 at 8:35
  • Nope, we are using JPA based on OpenJPA, and this annotation is OpenJPA-specific. I think Hibernate as JPA provider does not provide such functionality, only if you use it as plain Hibernate (HQL) and not JPA. And Spring Data JPA, as the name says, uses JPA... – Magic Wand Sep 9 '14 at 12:41

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.