14

Many devs do this:

public void foo() {
  if (flag) {
    // do stuff
  }
}

I prefer to "return early", and so do this instead:

public void foo() {

  if (!flag) return;

  // do stuff

}

In an ASP.NET-MVC Razor view, what is the correct way to abort/skip/cancel rendering of a view/partialview? For example how do I convert this:

@if (flag) {
  // do stuff
}

to something like this:

@if (!flag) { /* what do I do here to abort/skip/cancel the rendering? */ }

// do stuff

I've tried using return and playing with the Request, but am unsure how this affects the process. What is the correct way to do this?

  • You do not abort page rendering (unless you want to throw exceptions because of fatal errors). Logic has to stay in controller, view shouldn't have anything else than if (flag) {} to include/exclude sections according to controller's decisions (and even that may be done better with partial views). – Adriano Repetti Sep 9 '14 at 11:01
  • @AdrianoRepetti True. Perhaps "abort" is the wrong word. But question remains. – h bob Sep 9 '14 at 11:03
  • 1
    If with "abort" you mean you want to exclude something according to that flag then you have nothing to do, just use if to delimit such sections (eventually it may even be from that line to the end of file). Quickly it'll become hard to understand so you may use partial views for that. If you need to drop/skip/cancel page creation (for example to redirect to another page or to display something completely different) then you're doing that check in the wrong place. Do it in your controller, it'll pick right view and views won't be aware of such logic. – Adriano Repetti Sep 9 '14 at 11:06
  • 1
    @hbob Actually, the view gets compiled into a class (when the application starts up I believe), and then later on a method in the class get executed during the rendering pipeline - it doesn't work quite the way you think I suspect, and hopefully explains why there is no way to return early from a Razor view... – RB. Sep 9 '14 at 11:13
  • 1
    As I said... I don't have to maintain it, so good luck :) – Gone Coding Sep 9 '14 at 14:22
22

As I mentioned above, you can simply issue a return.

I recall cshtml files are compiled at runtime, which includes all inline code as well as the static html. That means that in theory, I'd expect any code to be left as-is and not transformed in any way.

So if you do this:

@if (!flag) { return; }

// do stuff

It works as expected (well for me at least). I just wanted to know if this leads to any unintended side-effects.

  • 2
    +1 My upvote but I wouldn't use it in any page (returning early is good IMO if you have 20 lines function but - usually - a cshtml page is longer and more convoluted, exactly the reasons single return point has been in use in the past). Anyway upvoted, even if I don't appreciate it, because I didn't even know it may work! With a quick look using Reflector to disassemble generated code it seems OK without (visible) side-effects. – Adriano Repetti Sep 9 '14 at 12:30
  • 1
    +1 for "you learn something new every day", but yeah - don't think I'm ever gonna use this one ;-) – RB. Sep 9 '14 at 12:35
  • 1
    @AdrianoRepetti Thanks for understanding! What you said above is true and I follow it 99% of the time. But in programming as in life, there is always the 1% and so it's good to understand the environment and be experienced enough to bend the rules without breaking the system. Didn't think of disassembling to see what happens, grazie! – h bob Sep 9 '14 at 13:41
  • 1
    @hbob if you find something interesting there please update your post, with a quick look it simply seems that return simply exits rendering function but I didn't see/check with exotic features and/or with or without layouts. – Adriano Repetti Sep 9 '14 at 13:51
  • @AdrianoRepetti : Early in my career as a developer I always tried to have one (or two) "return" points in my methods/members. Because that's what everyone was told to do. Turns out that trying to achieve that ends up creating WAY too much code nesting.You really shouldn't alter or sacrifice reasonable code flow just to achieve that obsolete principal. In modern programming, the consensus is that if you can exit a method, do it. And the sooner the better. And there is no need to even count how many returns you have, as long as your focus is to reduce code nesting. Anyway, my $0.02. – Paul Easter Aug 4 '17 at 16:29
4

If with "abort" you mean you want to exclude something according to that flag then you have nothing to do, just use if to delimit such sections (eventually it may even be from that line to the end of file). Like this:

 @if (Model.User.HasEditingPrivileges)
 {
     <input type="button" id="edit" value="Edit"/>
 }

Quickly it'll become hard to understand so you may use partial views for that (especially if blocks you have to include/exclude are big):

 @if (Model.User.HasEditingPrivileges)
 {
     Html.RenderPartial("EditSection");
 }

If you need to drop/skip/cancel page creation (for example to redirect to another page or to display something completely different), like this:

@if (!Model.User.hasEditingPrivileges)
{
    // Ooops, he shouldn't see this page, go back to Home!
}

Then you're doing that check in the wrong place. Do it in your controller, it'll pick right view and views won't be aware of such logic:

public ActionResult View(int id)
{
    if (HasUserEditingPrivileges)
        return View("Edit", new MyModel(id));

    return Redirect("UnauthorizedAccess"); // Oops, something went wrong
}

Why not?

  • Because views shouldn't be aware of such logic. If you need something like that (CGI like sequential flow) then you shouldn't use MVC because it adds a complexity you don't need.
  • Because you can't (unless someone find a terrible dirty hacky trick). MVC is structured to build a page when it has to be displayed (controller decides which page and with which data). When this building starts an output is required (unless you throw an exception to signal an error but you should really avoid exceptions to handle program flow then...). For small ifs you may simply use first mentioned method.

To summarize:

In an ASP.NET-MVC Razor view, what is the correct way to abort rendering of a view/partialview?

There is not a correcty way because you must not do it. Code in view has to render the page, it has not to decide which page should be sent to client. If you're doing anything else then you're using MVC as it shouldn't be used, it's just not correct.

  • I agree with all you've mentioned. And code that way too, almost always. But sometime I want to do what I've described above. I'm +1 you though, as I agree with what you've written in principle. – h bob Sep 9 '14 at 11:58

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