15

How would one create a method that takes an integer i, and move the member of a List<T> at index i from its current position to the front of the list?

  • you are trying to sort it, aren't you? – vittore Apr 4 '10 at 19:26
  • would i need to sort it to do that? i just want to move the ONE member at index i, to the front of the list.. don't need to move the rest – Shonna Apr 4 '10 at 19:27
  • I would have given you an upvote, but you didn't select the obvious answer. Sorry :(. – Mark Rogers May 6 '15 at 16:34
28

The List<T> class doesn't offer such a method, but you can write an extension method that gets the item, removes it and finally re-inserts it:

static class ListExtensions
{
    static void MoveItemAtIndexToFront<T>(this List<T> list, int index)
    {
        T item = list[index];
        list.RemoveAt(index);
        list.Insert(0, item);
    }
}
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  • the header for the method is supposed to be like this: public void MoveToFront(int i) – Shonna Apr 4 '10 at 19:31
  • 22
    Okay, since you know the signature I'm boldly claiming that this is homework. Tag it as that next time. – Benjamin Podszun Apr 4 '10 at 19:34
  • 1
    @Shonna: the method needs a reference to the list. You need to pass that in or change my code to access the list in a different way which should be simple enough. – dtb Apr 4 '10 at 19:35
  • @dtb You could match that header if you subclassed List<T> :-p – binki Mar 11 '16 at 21:04
13

Any of the 3 answers so far do the trick, but instead of doing a RemoveAt and a Insert operation, I would suggest moving each item one place to the right from the desired positions left, to the beginning of the list. That way you avoid moving the items placed at the right of the item moved.

This is a modification of @dtb's answer.

static class ListExtensions
{
    static void MoveItemAtIndexToFront<T>(this List<T> list, int index)
    {
        T item = list[index];
        for (int i = index; i > 0; i--)
            list[i] = list[i - 1];
        list[0] = item;
    }
}
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  • For an extension method, this would make more sense as it's faster on average than dtb's method. – Groo Sep 14 '15 at 8:54
  • @Groo Is it always faster, even for larger lists? – Coops Apr 5 '16 at 12:59
  • @CodeBlend: yes, for larger lists the difference would be more pronounced, although I cannot claim you will notice any difference in practice. Theoretically, this method and dtb's are both O(n), but in dtb's answer list.RemoveAt will first remove the item and then copy all following items one place backwards, and then list.Insert(0, item) will again insert the item at index 0 and then copy all items forward by 1 position. Fede's method, on the other hand, only does a single sweep backwards (number of swaps equal to index). – Groo Apr 5 '16 at 13:09
4
var l = new List<DataItem>();
var temp = l[index];
l.RemoveAt(index);
l.Insert(0, temp);
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2

Try this

    static List<int> idList = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 };

    private static void moveListItem(int index)
    {
        int getIndex = 0;

        foreach (int item in idList)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(" Before Id List Value - {0} ,Index - {1} ", item.ToString(), getIndex);
            getIndex++;
        }

        int value = idList[index];
        idList.RemoveAt(index);
        idList.Insert(0, value);

        Console.WriteLine();

        getIndex = 0;
        foreach (int item in idList)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(" After Id List Value - {0} ,Index - {1} ", item.ToString(), getIndex);
            getIndex++;
        }
    }
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1

At the risk of beating a dead horse:

Wouldn't a LinkedList be more suited for this? Although you would loose the random access functionality, inserting elements at the beginning of the List would be much simpler (.AddFirst) and a lot more efficient.

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