0

I am getting an undeclared identifier error in the line: "printf("%f", new_u[i]);" Which is strange because I can print i in that for loop at it has values. Why am I getting that error?

const int MAX = 101;

int main(void) {

    int t = 1; //time
    int m = 0; //number of segments of bar
    int n = 0; //number of time intervals

    double new_u[MAX]; //to store temps currently being converted (array of 101 doubles)
    double old_u[MAX]; //to store temps corresponding to prev time (array of 101 doubles)

    printf("Enter number of segments: ");
    scanf("%d", &m);
    printf("Enter number of time intervals: ");
    scanf("%d", &n);

    double h = (1.0/m); //length of bar segments
    double d = (1.0/n); //length of time interval

    for (int j = 1; j <= n; j++) { //j is which time interval the iteration is on
        int t_j = j * d; //t_j is the actual fraction of a second the iteration is on (i.e. 0.0, 0.2, 0.4...)
        new_u[0] = new_u[m] = 0.0;
        for (int i = 1; i < m; i++)
            new_u[i] = old_u[i] + d/(h*h)*(old_u[i-1] - 2*old_u[i] + old_u[i+1]);
        printf("%f", new_u[i]);
        //I need to finish code by printing new_u values
        //Then copy new_u into old_u for next pass;
    }

}
  • Replace printf("%f", new_u[i]); with printf("%f", new_u[m]); – Mohit Jain Sep 10 '14 at 5:36
  • 1
    Scope of i is only with in the for loop. – user1336087 Sep 10 '14 at 6:49
2

As you are not using any braces for the inner for loop,so the value of i is not known to that printf statement.In conditional and looping statements,if there are no braces (or block created )for them,then they can only manipulate and have scope restricted only upto the statement just after there declaration.

for (int i = 1; i < m; i++)
        new_u[i] = old_u[i] + d/(h*h)*(old_u[i-1] - 2*old_u[i] + old_u[i+1]); //i  is known here
        printf("%f", new_u[i]); //i is not available for this

use braces like this

 for (int i = 1; i < m; i++)
 {
    new_u[i] = old_u[i] + d/(h*h)*(old_u[i-1] - 2*old_u[i] + old_u[i+1]);
    printf("%f", new_u[i]);
 }
  • yep that was it... Thank you for catching that silly mistake – Tyler S. Sep 10 '14 at 4:41
  • You are welcome ! – nobalG Sep 10 '14 at 4:41
  • BTW, your indentation style suggests that you did not intend the printf to be a part of the for i... loop. – John Hascall Sep 10 '14 at 5:51
  • @JohnHascall Thanks for pointing out,fixed it ... :) – nobalG Sep 10 '14 at 5:57
0

The unknown identifier is i, not new_u; you need braces:

for (int i = 1; i < m; i++) {
    new_u[i] = old_u[i] + d/(h*h)*(old_u[i-1] 
               - 2*old_u[i] + old_u[i+1]);
    if (i>1) putchar(' ');
    printf("%f", new_u[i]);
}

In your wrong version of the code i was visible only by the assignment to new_u[i] not by your printf

BTW, you probably want a space to be put between your numbers, like I did with putchar. Otherwise the output could be unreadable, e.g. 1.233.45 for two numbers 1.23 and 3.45

Since you have a for (int i=1; loop the scope of i is only the (test, increment and) body of your for; in your case that body was a single assignment.

  • Yeah I know, why is that? I am obviously missing something simple but I have checked that i has values, why is it then an unknown identifier – Tyler S. Sep 10 '14 at 4:37
0

Just put a brace in the second for loop covering print function also...

for (int i = 1; i < m; i++)
 {
    new_u[i] = old_u[i] + d/(h*h)*(old_u[i-1] - 2*old_u[i] + old_u[i+1]);
    printf("%f", new_u[i]);
 }

and answer to your above comment is that

1). 'i' is an unknown identifier because its out of scope now as it has got its scope for the second FOR loop only.

2). 'i' has values because you put the values in it in the FOR loop and after being out of scope also automatic variables doesn't gets destroyed, it stays there until it gets overwritten by some new variable while execution.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.