216

How can I bring my WPF application to the front of the desktop? So far I've tried:

SwitchToThisWindow(new WindowInteropHelper(Application.Current.MainWindow).Handle, true);

SetWindowPos(new WindowInteropHelper(Application.Current.MainWindow).Handle, IntPtr.Zero, 0, 0, 0, 0, SWP_NOMOVE | SWP_NOSIZE);

SetForegroundWindow(new WindowInteropHelper(Application.Current.MainWindow).Handle);

None of which are doing the job (Marshal.GetLastWin32Error() is saying these operations completed successfully, and the P/Invoke attributes for each definition do have SetLastError=true).

If I create a new blank WPF application, and call SwitchToThisWindow with a timer, it works exactly as expected, so I'm not sure why it's not working in my original case.

Edit: I'm doing this in conjunction with a global hotkey.

  • Have you verified that MainWindow is the window you want? From MSDN: MainWindow is automatically set with a reference to the first Window object to be instantiated in the AppDomain. – Todd White Nov 2 '08 at 23:51
  • Good thought, but it is the only Window in the application. – Factor Mystic Nov 2 '08 at 23:55
  • Can you give a bit more context code? – Todd White Nov 3 '08 at 1:02

18 Answers 18

317
myWindow.Activate();

Attempts to bring the window to the foreground and activates it.

That should do the trick, unless I misunderstood and you want Always on Top behavior. In that case you want:

myWindow.TopMost = true;
| improve this answer | |
  • 14
    I was simply using myWindow.Show() and sometimes it wasn't on top. I placed a call to myWindow.Activate() immediately afterwards and it worked. – Bermo Aug 26 '09 at 4:54
  • 4
    Activate does not work on Windows XP sometimes. I recommend @Matthew Xavier 's answer. – Lex Li Sep 18 '10 at 5:47
  • A bit odd, since by default ShowActivated is on. – greenoldman May 26 '11 at 19:30
  • 1
    The first answer is good, thanks for that! But the second line of code, using the Topmost property is a bad practice since it can obscure other popup dialogs and have unexpected behavior. – Jonathan Perry Jul 22 '14 at 13:51
  • 3
    Actually it can be done with this: if (myWindow.WindowState == WindowState.Minimized) myWindow.WindowState = WindowState.Normal; Oddly it will also preserve any Maximized windows and not revert them to a Normal state. – r41n Feb 21 '17 at 8:35
171

I have found a solution that brings the window to the top, but it behaves as a normal window:

if (!Window.IsVisible)
{
    Window.Show();
}

if (Window.WindowState == WindowState.Minimized)
{
    Window.WindowState = WindowState.Normal;
}

Window.Activate();
Window.Topmost = true;  // important
Window.Topmost = false; // important
Window.Focus();         // important
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Great hint! TopMost makes the magic happen on Windows 7 if the window is already open, but below the other windows. – gsb Sep 29 '12 at 18:37
  • This did the trick for me too. Thanks to gsb for the additional comment about what looks like a strange use of TopMost! – Jen Jul 15 '13 at 6:56
  • 1
    Thanks - the fix was short and sweet. – code4life May 7 '14 at 16:50
  • 2
    In my case Window.Activate() and Window.Focus() were sufficient. Setting Window.TopMost is unnecessary. – virious May 8 '14 at 14:08
  • 6
    Do not use Window.Focus(). This will grab the focus away from what the user is currently typing in a text box, which is insanely frustrating for end users. The code above works just fine without it. – Contango Mar 18 '16 at 12:45
34

In case you need the window to be in front the first time it loads then you should use the following:

private void Window_ContentRendered(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    this.Topmost = false;
}

private void Window_Initialized(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    this.Topmost = true;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    If you develop something similar to Launchy (launchy.net) in C#, you should notice this answer is almost useless. – Lex Li Sep 18 '10 at 5:48
22

I know this question is rather old, but I've just come across this precise scenario and wanted to share the solution I've implemented.

As mentioned in comments on this page, several of the solutions proposed do not work on XP, which I need to support in my scenario. While I agree with the sentiment by @Matthew Xavier that generally this is a bad UX practice, there are times where it's entirely a plausable UX.

The solution to bringing a WPF window to the top was actually provided to me by the same code I'm using to provide the global hotkey. A blog article by Joseph Cooney contains a link to his code samples that contains the original code.

I've cleaned up and modified the code a little, and implemented it as an extension method to System.Windows.Window. I've tested this on XP 32 bit and Win7 64 bit, both of which work correctly.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Interop;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace System.Windows
{
    public static class SystemWindows
    {
        #region Constants

        const UInt32 SWP_NOSIZE = 0x0001;
        const UInt32 SWP_NOMOVE = 0x0002;
        const UInt32 SWP_SHOWWINDOW = 0x0040;

        #endregion

        /// <summary>
        /// Activate a window from anywhere by attaching to the foreground window
        /// </summary>
        public static void GlobalActivate(this Window w)
        {
            //Get the process ID for this window's thread
            var interopHelper = new WindowInteropHelper(w);
            var thisWindowThreadId = GetWindowThreadProcessId(interopHelper.Handle, IntPtr.Zero);

            //Get the process ID for the foreground window's thread
            var currentForegroundWindow = GetForegroundWindow();
            var currentForegroundWindowThreadId = GetWindowThreadProcessId(currentForegroundWindow, IntPtr.Zero);

            //Attach this window's thread to the current window's thread
            AttachThreadInput(currentForegroundWindowThreadId, thisWindowThreadId, true);

            //Set the window position
            SetWindowPos(interopHelper.Handle, new IntPtr(0), 0, 0, 0, 0, SWP_NOSIZE | SWP_NOMOVE | SWP_SHOWWINDOW);

            //Detach this window's thread from the current window's thread
            AttachThreadInput(currentForegroundWindowThreadId, thisWindowThreadId, false);

            //Show and activate the window
            if (w.WindowState == WindowState.Minimized) w.WindowState = WindowState.Normal;
            w.Show();
            w.Activate();
        }

        #region Imports

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        private static extern IntPtr GetForegroundWindow();

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        private static extern uint GetWindowThreadProcessId(IntPtr hWnd, IntPtr ProcessId);

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        private static extern bool AttachThreadInput(uint idAttach, uint idAttachTo, bool fAttach);

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        public static extern bool SetWindowPos(IntPtr hWnd, IntPtr hWndInsertAfter, int X, int Y, int cx, int cy, uint uFlags);

        #endregion
    }
}

I hope this code helps others who encounter this problem.

| improve this answer | |
  • Hey lookie there! I've been struggling with this for months! This works for both my situations. Awesome! (Windows 7 x64) – mdiehl13 Jul 10 '15 at 7:11
  • Actually, it only seems to work if I do this: App.mainWindow.Show(); SystemWindows.GlobalActivate(App.mainwindow); // When I remove the first .show() it does not bring to front – mdiehl13 Jul 10 '15 at 7:25
  • +1 for SetWindowPos(), I was looking for a way to only bring my Window to front without interrupting other apps or stealing focus. this.Activate() steals focus. – prettyvoid Aug 21 '15 at 17:25
  • This did it for me, and it my case the whole point was to steal focus, as it happend when a user interacted with certain element. so Thanks alot this seems to work consistent! just calling this.Activate() only seems to work some times. – Peter Jul 18 '16 at 8:50
21

To make this a quick copy-paste one -
Use this class' DoOnProcess method to move process' main window to foreground (but not to steal focus from other windows)

public class MoveToForeground
{
    [DllImportAttribute("User32.dll")]
    private static extern int FindWindow(String ClassName, String WindowName);

    const int SWP_NOMOVE        = 0x0002;
    const int SWP_NOSIZE        = 0x0001;            
    const int SWP_SHOWWINDOW    = 0x0040;
    const int SWP_NOACTIVATE    = 0x0010;
    [DllImport("user32.dll", EntryPoint = "SetWindowPos")]
    public static extern IntPtr SetWindowPos(IntPtr hWnd, int hWndInsertAfter, int x, int Y, int cx, int cy, int wFlags);

    public static void DoOnProcess(string processName)
    {
        var allProcs = Process.GetProcessesByName(processName);
        if (allProcs.Length > 0)
        {
            Process proc = allProcs[0];
            int hWnd = FindWindow(null, proc.MainWindowTitle.ToString());
            // Change behavior by settings the wFlags params. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms633545(VS.85).aspx
            SetWindowPos(new IntPtr(hWnd), 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, SWP_NOMOVE | SWP_NOSIZE | SWP_SHOWWINDOW | SWP_NOACTIVATE);
        }
    }
}

HTH

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    +1 this is the only answer that was useful for me. I have an application with one master and several floating slave windows. Upon activating any of these, all other windows should be brought to front as well. But not activated/gain focus as most answers suggest: that is a disaster as it makes the window currently clicked on unclickable since suddenly another window gains focus. – stijn Dec 23 '11 at 10:11
  • Any reason for not using process.MainWindowHandle? – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 26 '14 at 6:06
  • In my case, I didn't want the main window, but agreed, there's other ways of getting an hWnd. FWIW an HwndSource object worked well. – tobriand Apr 17 '15 at 16:32
13

If the user is interacting with another application, it may not be possible to bring yours to the front. As a general rule, a process can only expect to set the foreground window if that process is already the foreground process. (Microsoft documents the restrictions in the SetForegroundWindow() MSDN entry.) This is because:

  1. The user "owns" the foreground. For example, it would be extremely annoying if another program stole the foreground while the user is typing, at the very least interrupting her workflow, and possibly causing unintended consequences as her keystrokes meant for one application are misinterpreted by the offender until she notices the change.
  2. Imagine that each of two programs checks to see if its window is the foreground and attempts to set it to the foreground if it is not. As soon as the second program is running, the computer is rendered useless as the foreground bounces between the two at every task switch.
| improve this answer | |
  • Good point. The purpose of the code was in conjunction with a global hotkey, though, and other applications do it somehow. – Factor Mystic Jan 12 '09 at 22:52
  • Have to use PInvoke in C# to emulate what is described in this article, codeproject.com/Tips/76427/… – Lex Li Sep 18 '10 at 5:45
  • then why do expression blends error popup dialogs stay visible when I switch to visual studio sometimes? :-/ – Simon_Weaver Sep 30 '10 at 5:37
  • Simon, I suspect that the error popups you see are "topmost" windows (a design decision of which I disapprove). There is a difference between the foreground window (which receives user input) and a "topmost" window in the Z-order. Any window can make itself "topmost", which places it atop all non-topmost windows, but doesn't give the window keyboard focus, etc. the way becoming the foreground window does. – Matthew Xavier Oct 6 '10 at 14:22
  • The trick fails for a few special windows. Visual Studio and command prompt windows must have something that prevents other window becoming the foreground window. – Lex Li Nov 27 '10 at 13:28
9

I know that this is late answer, maybe helpful for researchers

 if (!WindowName.IsVisible)
 {
     WindowName.Show();
     WindowName.Activate();
 }
| improve this answer | |
9

Why some of the answers on this page are wrong!

  • Any answer that uses window.Focus() is wrong.

    • Why? If a notification message pops up, window.Focus() will grab the focus away from whatever the user is typing at the time. This is insanely frustrating for end users, especially if the popups occur quite frequently.
  • Any answer that uses window.Activate() is wrong.

    • Why? It will make any parent windows visible as well.
  • Any answer that omits window.ShowActivated = false is wrong.
    • Why? It will grab the focus away from another window when the message pops up which is very annoying!
  • Any answer that does not use Visibility.Visible to hide/show the window is wrong.
    • Why? If we are using Citrix, if the window is not collapsed when it is closed, it will leave a weird black rectangular hold on the screen. Thus, we cannot use window.Show() and window.Hide().

Essentially:

  • The window should not grab the focus away from any other window when it activates;
  • The window should not activate its parent when it is shown;
  • The window should be compatible with Citrix.

MVVM Solution

This code is 100% compatible with Citrix (no blank areas of the screen). It is tested with both normal WPF and DevExpress.

This answer is intended for any use case where we want a small notification window that is always in front of other windows (if the user selects this in the preferences).

If this answer seems more complex than the others, it's because it is robust, enterprise level code. Some of the other answers on this page are simple, but do not actually work.

XAML - Attached Property

Add this attached property to any UserControl within the window. The attached property will:

  • Wait until the Loaded event is fired (otherwise it cannot look up the visual tree to find the parent window).
  • Add an event handler that ensures that the window is visible or not.

At any point, you can set the window to be in front or not, by flipping the value of the attached property.

<UserControl x:Class="..."
         ...
         attachedProperties:EnsureWindowInForeground.EnsureWindowInForeground=
             "{Binding EnsureWindowInForeground, Mode=OneWay}">

C# - Helper Method

public static class HideAndShowWindowHelper
{
    /// <summary>
    ///     Intent: Ensure that small notification window is on top of other windows.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="window"></param>
    public static void ShiftWindowIntoForeground(Window window)
    {
        try
        {
            // Prevent the window from grabbing focus away from other windows the first time is created.
            window.ShowActivated = false;

            // Do not use .Show() and .Hide() - not compatible with Citrix!
            if (window.Visibility != Visibility.Visible)
            {
                window.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
            }

            // We can't allow the window to be maximized, as there is no de-maximize button!
            if (window.WindowState == WindowState.Maximized)
            {
                window.WindowState = WindowState.Normal;
            }

            window.Topmost = true;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            // Gulp. Avoids "Cannot set visibility while window is closing".
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Intent: Ensure that small notification window can be hidden by other windows.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="window"></param>
    public static void ShiftWindowIntoBackground(Window window)
    {
        try
        {
            // Prevent the window from grabbing focus away from other windows the first time is created.
            window.ShowActivated = false;

            // Do not use .Show() and .Hide() - not compatible with Citrix!
            if (window.Visibility != Visibility.Collapsed)
            {
                window.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
            }

            // We can't allow the window to be maximized, as there is no de-maximize button!
            if (window.WindowState == WindowState.Maximized)
            {
                window.WindowState = WindowState.Normal;
            }

            window.Topmost = false;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            // Gulp. Avoids "Cannot set visibility while window is closing".
        }
    }
}

Usage

In order to use this, you need to create the window in your ViewModel:

private ToastView _toastViewWindow;
private void ShowWindow()
{
    if (_toastViewWindow == null)
    {
        _toastViewWindow = new ToastView();
        _dialogService.Show<ToastView>(this, this, _toastViewWindow, true);
    }
    ShiftWindowOntoScreenHelper.ShiftWindowOntoScreen(_toastViewWindow);
    HideAndShowWindowHelper.ShiftWindowIntoForeground(_toastViewWindow);
}

private void HideWindow()
{
    if (_toastViewWindow != null)
    {
        HideAndShowWindowHelper.ShiftWindowIntoBackground(_toastViewWindow);
    }
}

Additional links

For tips on how ensure that a notification window always shifts back onto the visible screen, see my answer: In WPF, how to shift a window onto the screen if it is off the screen?.

| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    "Enterprise level code" and a few lines later catch (Exception) { }. Yeah right... And it uses code that isn't even shown in the answer like _dialogService or ShiftWindowOntoScreenHelper. Plus asking to create the window in viewmodel side (which basically breaks the whole MVVM pattern)... – Kryptos Aug 31 '18 at 2:06
  • @Kryptos This is enterprise level code. I typed it out from memory, and this exact technique is used in a large FTSE100 company. Real life is somewhat less pristine compared to the perfect design patterns that we are all aiming for. – Contango Sep 1 '18 at 8:06
  • I don't like the fact that we keep an instance of the window in the view model myself, as Kryptos mentioned that breaks the whole point of mvvm, maybe it could have been done in codebehind instead? – Igor Meszaros Feb 28 '19 at 13:46
  • 1
    @Igor Meszaros Agreed. Now that I have more experience, if I had to do it again, it I would add a Behavior, and control it using a Func<> that is bound to the ViewModel. – Contango Mar 5 '19 at 19:29
7

I have had a similar problem with a WPF application that gets invoked from an Access application via the Shell object.

My solution is below - works in XP and Win7 x64 with app compiled to x86 target.

I'd much rather do this than simulate an alt-tab.

void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    // make sure the window is normal or maximised
    // this was the core of the problem for me;
    // even though the default was "Normal", starting it via shell minimised it
    this.WindowState = WindowState.Normal;

    // only required for some scenarios
    this.Activate();
}
| improve this answer | |
5

Well, since this is such a hot topic... here is what works for me. I got errors if I didn't do it this way because Activate() will error out on you if you cannot see the window.

Xaml:

<Window .... 
        Topmost="True" 
        .... 
        ContentRendered="mainWindow_ContentRendered"> .... </Window>

Codebehind:

private void mainWindow_ContentRendered(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    this.Topmost = false;
    this.Activate();
    _UsernameTextBox.Focus();
}

This was the only way for me to get the window to show on top. Then activate it so you can type in the box without having to set focus with the mouse. control.Focus() wont work unless the window is Active();

| improve this answer | |
  • Works for me with splash screen showing before. Thank you. – SiL3NC3 Jul 9 at 10:44
2

Well I figured out a work around. I'm making the call from a keyboard hook used to implement a hotkey. The call works as expected if I put it into a BackgroundWorker with a pause. It's a kludge, but I have no idea why it wasn't working originally.

void hotkey_execute()
{
    IntPtr handle = new WindowInteropHelper(Application.Current.MainWindow).Handle;
    BackgroundWorker bg = new BackgroundWorker();
    bg.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(delegate
        {
            Thread.Sleep(10);
            SwitchToThisWindow(handle, true);
        });
    bg.RunWorkerAsync();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Just interested: Did you try Window.Activate (as suggested by Morten) and the other suggestions? They seem less hacky than this admitted kludge. – Simon D. Oct 14 '09 at 20:10
  • This has been quite awhile ago, but yes, at the time I did try that – Factor Mystic Oct 15 '09 at 0:34
  • This does not work on my Windows XP. I recommend @Matthew Xavier 's answer. – Lex Li Sep 18 '10 at 5:49
2

To show ANY currently opened window import those DLL:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    [DllImportAttribute("User32.dll")]
    private static extern int FindWindow(String ClassName, String WindowName);
    [DllImportAttribute("User32.dll")]
    private static extern int SetForegroundWindow(int hWnd);

and in program We search for app with specified title (write title without first letter (index > 0))

  foreach (Process proc in Process.GetProcesses())
                {
                    tx = proc.MainWindowTitle.ToString();
                    if (tx.IndexOf("Title of Your app WITHOUT FIRST LETTER") > 0)
                    {
                        tx = proc.MainWindowTitle;
                        hWnd = proc.Handle.ToInt32(); break;
                    }
                }
                hWnd = FindWindow(null, tx);
                if (hWnd > 0)
                {
                    SetForegroundWindow(hWnd);
                }
| improve this answer | |
1

The problem could be that the thread calling your code from the hook hasn't been initialized by the runtime so calling runtime methods don't work.

Perhaps you could try doing an Invoke to marshal your code on to the UI thread to call your code that brings the window to the foreground.

| improve this answer | |
1

These codes will work fine all times.

At first set the activated event handler in XAML:

Activated="Window_Activated"

Add below line to your Main Window constructor block:

public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    this.LocationChanged += (sender, e) => this.Window_Activated(sender, e);
}

And inside the activated event handler copy this codes:

private void Window_Activated(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (Application.Current.Windows.Count > 1)
    {
        foreach (Window win in Application.Current.Windows)
            try
            {
                if (!win.Equals(this))
                {
                    if (!win.IsVisible)
                    {
                        win.ShowDialog();
                    }

                    if (win.WindowState == WindowState.Minimized)
                    {
                        win.WindowState = WindowState.Normal;
                    }

                    win.Activate();
                    win.Topmost = true;
                    win.Topmost = false;
                    win.Focus();
                }
            }
            catch { }
    }
    else
        this.Focus();
}

These steps will works fine and will bring to front all other windows into their parents window.

| improve this answer | |
0

If you are trying to hide the window, for example you minimize the window, I have found that using

    this.Hide();

will hide it correctly, then simply using

    this.Show();

will then show the window as the top most item once again.

| improve this answer | |
0

Just wanted to add another solution to this question. This implementation works for my scenario, where CaliBurn is responsible for displaying the main Window.

protected override void OnStartup(object sender, StartupEventArgs e)
{
    DisplayRootViewFor<IMainWindowViewModel>();

    Application.MainWindow.Topmost = true;
    Application.MainWindow.Activate();
    Application.MainWindow.Activated += OnMainWindowActivated;
}

private static void OnMainWindowActivated(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var window = sender as Window;
    if (window != null)
    {
        window.Activated -= OnMainWindowActivated;
        window.Topmost = false;
        window.Focus();
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Remember not to put the code that shows that window inside a PreviewMouseDoubleClick handler as the active window will switch back to the window who handled the event. Just put it in the MouseDoubleClick event handler or stop bubbling by setting e.Handled to True.

In my case i was handling the PreviewMouseDoubleClick on a Listview and was not setting the e.Handled = true then it raised the MouseDoubleClick event witch sat focus back to the original window.

| improve this answer | |
-1

I built an extension method to make for easy reuse.

using System.Windows.Forms;
    namespace YourNamespace{
        public static class WindowsFormExtensions {
            public static void PutOnTop(this Form form) {
                form.Show();
                form.Activate();
            }// END PutOnTop()       
        }// END class
    }// END namespace

Call in the Form Constructor

namespace YourNamespace{
       public partial class FormName : Form {
       public FormName(){
            this.PutOnTop();
            InitalizeComponents();
        }// END Constructor
    } // END Form            
}// END namespace
| improve this answer | |
  • Hi Mike. You are answering this question quite late. Can you explain in your answer why this approach is different (and perhaps better) from the very good answers that were already posted for this question? – Noel Widmer May 18 '17 at 18:24
  • Only late as I just needed to do this, and I came across this and wanted to share how i solved the problem encase others wanted to use it. – Mike May 19 '17 at 18:46
  • Sure, I was choosen to review your post and wanted to make you aware. It is always good to provide a new answer if you think it is a good contribution to the community. – Noel Widmer May 19 '17 at 19:20
  • 2
    This question was specifically about WPF, but your solution is for WinForms. – Brian Reichle May 20 '17 at 1:00

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