52

I tried the following code in Java

t1 = 5;
t2 = t1 + (++t1);
System.out.println (t2);

My view is since ++ has a higher precedence than +, the above becomes

t2 = t1 + (++t1);
t2 = t1 + 6;      // t1 becomes 6 here
t2 = 6 + 6;
t2 = 12;

However, I get the answer 11 for t2. Can someone explain?

  • 65
    Try to avoid ++/-- in compound expressions. While this behavior is well-defined in Java, it produces different results (ie. 12) in perl and results in undefined-behavior in C/C++. Plus, it often makes the expression harder to quickly analyze.. (case in point, perhaps) – user2864740 Sep 10 '14 at 9:09
  • 13
    The fact that this is considered "undefined behavior" in C should give you a heads up that it's probably not a good idea to use the construct in any language. It seems to me there is just too much opportunity for not getting the answer you would expect. Do everyone a favor and use two lines of code - your future self will thank you... – Floris Sep 10 '14 at 13:16
  • I think it's a good question, but rather interesting than useful: you should just avoid increment/decrement operators in compound expressions (see comments above) and save yourself a headache. – MC Emperor Sep 10 '14 at 22:48
  • See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/6800590/… – fgb Sep 11 '14 at 12:42

10 Answers 10

76

You are nearly correct but you are subtly misunderstanding how the precedence rules work.

Compare these two cases:

int t1 = 5;
int t2 = t1 + (++t1);
System.out.println (t2);

t1 = 5;
t2 = (++t1) + t1;
System.out.println (t2);

The result is:

11
12

The precedence does indeed say to evaluate the ++ before the +, but that doesn't apply until it reaches that part of the expression.

Your expression is of the form X + Y Where X is t1 and Y is (++t1)

The left branch, i.e. X, is evaluated first. Afterwards the right branch, i.e. Y, is evaluated. Only when it comes to evaluate Y the ++ operation is performed.

The precedence rules only say that the ++ is "inside" the Y expression, they don't say anything about the order of operations.

  • 8
    I love/hate that when you look at those two statements it appears you're turning a = b + c into a = c + b and yet they produce two different results. – corsiKa Sep 11 '14 at 0:17
55

Your logic is close, but not quite right. The order of evaluation is Left to Right for the + operator. t1 comes before the binary op, LHS and then the increment is on the RHS of that binary op. The LHS is executed first.

t2 = t1 + (++t1);
t2 = 5 + 6;      // t1 becomes 6 here as a side effect before being read on the RHS
t2 = 11;

Visualised as a tree you have,

    +
  /   \
 t1   ++t1

Precedence Order

When two operators share an operand the operator with the higher precedence goes first. For example, 1 + 2 * 3 is treated as 1 + (2 * 3), whereas 1 * 2 + 3 is treated as (1 * 2) + 3 since multiplication has a higher precedence than addition.

Associativity

When two operators with the same precedence the expression is evaluated according to its associativity. For example x = y = z = 17 is treated as x = (y = (z = 17)), leaving all three variables with the value 17, since the = operator has right-to-left associativity (and an assignment statement evaluates to the value on the right hand side). On the other hand, 72 / 2 / 3 is treated as (72 / 2) / 3 since the / operator has left-to-right associativity.

  • 3
    IMO "[the] logic is not so close". Vivek is confusing evaluation order and precedence in his question. The point should be made that they are quite different. – Po' Lazarus Sep 10 '14 at 9:40
15

Another way of thinking of it is to expand the ++ expression:

++t1 is the same as putting t1 = t1 + 1.

1) t1 = 5;
2) t2 = t1 + (++t1); 
3) t2 = t1 + (t1 = t1 + 1), 
4) t2 = 5 + (t1 = t1 + 1)
5) t2 = 5 + (t1 = 6)
6) t2 = 5 + 6 = 11

If you were to reverse the order to t2 = (++t1) + t1; Then the expression would expand to:

1) t2 = (t1 = t1 + 1) + t1     
2) t2 = (t1 = 5 + 1) + t1
3) t2 = (t1 = 6) + t1
4) t2 = 6 + 6 = 12
5

To add a point to Chris K,

The associativity is from left to right

So,

t2 = t1 + (++t1);
t2 = 5 + 6;      // first t1 is replaced with 5 and then the next 6 
t2 = 11;
3

The + is evaluated from left to right, so

t1 + (++t1)     // Left side is evaluated to 5, right side evaluated to 6...
5  + (6)        // ...and as a side effect t1 becomes 6

Results in 11.

2

evaluation happen from left to right. So actually what happen is following

t2 = t1 + (++t1);
t2 = 5 + 6;      
t2 = 11;
2

The value of t1 in the second line is 5

t2 = t1 + (++t1)
t2 = 5 + 6;      // t1 becomes 6 here

The evaluation order is from left to right.

So first t1 is evaluated to 5 then ++t1 to 6 and hence the result as 11

0

++x is executed before you use the variable x, and x++ increase x after you used it:

x=5;
y=x++;
y is 5;
and x is 6

x=5;
y=++x;
y is 6;
and x is 6
  • 3
    ++x and x++ are AFAIK executed at the same time, but they return an other value. ++x returns the new value, x++ returns the old value. – Joshua Behrens Sep 10 '14 at 10:58
0
t2 = t1 + (++t1);

This is equivalent to

temp = t1 + 1
t2 =  t1 + temp;
t1= temp;
  • 2
    Actually it's more like temp = t1; t1++; t2 = temp + t1 – Adam Smith Sep 11 '14 at 1:18
0
enter code here
t1 = 5;
t2 = t1 + (++t1);
// it takes 5 for t1 and as it moves further to (++t1), it increments t1 to 6, so it takes 6 for  (++t1)
t2 = 5 + 6;
// (++t1) this increments t1 by 1 then return new value. So (++t1)=6
// (t1++) this returns old value n then increments t1 by 1. So (t1++)=5
  • Could you add a few lines to explain why you think your answer is best suited to answer the original question ? Thanks. – m4rtin Sep 18 '14 at 10:15

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