I have a struct defined as:

struct {
 char name[32];
 int  size;
 int  start;
 int  popularity;
} stasher_file;

and an array of pointers to those structs:

struct stasher_file *files[TOTAL_STORAGE_SIZE];

In my code, I'm making a pointer to the struct and setting its members, and adding it to the array:

 ...
 struct stasher_file *newFile;
 strncpy(newFile->name, name, 32);
 newFile->size = size;
 newFile->start = first_free;
 newFile->popularity = 0;
 files[num_files] = newFile;
 ...

I'm getting the following error:

error: dereferencing pointer to incomplete type

whenever I try to access the members inside newFile. What am I doing wrong?

  • Thanks everyone for the help :) – confusedKid Apr 5 '10 at 1:59
  • By the way, I had the same error, but the problem was that I did not include a specific header file (in a big project). – ady May 6 '16 at 18:51
up vote 46 down vote accepted

You haven't defined struct stasher_file by your first definition. What you have defined is an nameless struct type and a variable stasher_file of that type. Since there's no definition for such type as struct stasher_file in your code, the compiler complains about incomplete type.

In order to define struct stasher_file, you should have done it as follows

struct stasher_file {
 char name[32];
 int  size;
 int  start;
 int  popularity;
};

Note where the stasher_file name is placed in the definition.

  • 1
    +1 Faster than me, and using struct stasher_file instead of a typedef is consistent with the OP's use of the type in the example. – Dirk Apr 5 '10 at 1:52

You are using the pointer newFile without allocating space for it.

struct stasher_file *newFile = malloc(sizeof(stasher_file));

Also you should put the struct name at the top. Where you specified stasher_file is to create an instance of that struct.

struct stasher_file {
    char name[32];
    int  size;
    int  start;
    int  popularity;
};
  • How do I allocate space for it? – confusedKid Apr 5 '10 at 1:47
  • I didn't allocate space for the newFile, but changed the definition of stasher_file to be like yours, and the error didn't come up. Do I still need to allocate space? – confusedKid Apr 5 '10 at 1:55
  • 1
    @confuseKid: yes you need to allocate space like I gave. Also make sure to free it when done with it. – Brian R. Bondy Apr 5 '10 at 1:57
  • 2
    @confuseKid: I recommend that you accept @AndreyT's answer though, he gives a better explanation for the source of the error. – Brian R. Bondy Apr 5 '10 at 1:57
  • 1
    There is no requirement to allocate space for a pointer – Imme22009 Sep 30 '13 at 14:07

How did you actually define the structure? If

struct {
  char name[32];
  int  size;
  int  start;
  int  popularity;
} stasher_file;

is to be taken as type definition, it's missing a typedef. When written as above, you actually define a variable called stasher_file, whose type is some anonymous struct type.

Try

typedef struct { ... } stasher_file;

(or, as already mentioned by others):

struct stasher_file { ... };

The latter actually matches your use of the type. The first form would require that you remove the struct before variable declarations.

the case above is for a new project. I hit upon this error while editing a fork of a well established library.

the typedef was included in the file I was editing but the struct wasn't.

The end result being that I was attempting to edit the struct in the wrong place.

If you run into this in a similar way look for other places where the struct is edited and try it there.

  • 1
    +1, since this remark got me on the right track! – Ludo Oct 10 '13 at 11:09

The reason why you're getting that error is because you've declared your struct as:

struct {
 char name[32];
 int  size;
 int  start;
 int  popularity;
} stasher_file;

This is not declaring a stasher_file type. This is declaring an anonymous struct type and is creating a global instance named stasher_file.

What you intended was:

struct stasher_file {
 char name[32];
 int  size;
 int  start;
 int  popularity;
};

But note that while Brian R. Bondy's response wasn't correct about your error message, he's right that you're trying to write into the struct without having allocated space for it. If you want an array of pointers to struct stasher_file structures, you'll need to call malloc to allocate space for each one:

struct stasher_file *newFile = malloc(sizeof *newFile);
if (newFile == NULL) {
   /* Failure handling goes here. */
}
strncpy(newFile->name, name, 32);
newFile->size = size;
...

(BTW, be careful when using strncpy; it's not guaranteed to NUL-terminate.)

  • if you have defined structure as typedef struct { ... } stasher_file; then you can use malloc as stasher_file *newFile = malloc(sizeof (stasher_file); – katta Apr 22 '13 at 20:10
  • @katta Yes, but many people consider it to be a better practice to do T* p = malloc(sizeof *p) instead. That way if the type of p ever changes, you have to update only its declaration and not the malloc sites. Forgetting to update the malloc sites would silently allocate the wrong amount of memory, potentially leading to buffer overflows. – jamesdlin Apr 22 '13 at 23:06
  • @katta Also see stackoverflow.com/questions/373252/… – jamesdlin Apr 22 '13 at 23:34

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