1

I am writing a script that involves printing the contents of a hash of a hash of arrays.

ex (pseudo code):

my %hash = ();
$hash{key1}{key2} = ['value1', 'value2', 'value3', . . .];

or

$hash{key1}{key2} = @array_of_values;

Basically I want to be able to do this for any number of key combinations and be able to loop through all of the possible key/value pairs (or probably more correctly stated as key,key/array pairs since each value is actually an array of values and each array has 2 keys associated with it) and print the output in the following format:

"key1, key2, value1, value2, value3, . . .\n"

ex:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

# initialize hash
my %hash = ();
my $string1 = "string1";
my $string2 = "string2";

# push strings onto arrays stored in hash
push @{$hash{a}{b}}, $string1;
push @{$hash{a}{b}}, $string2;
push @{$hash{c}{d}}, $string2;
push @{$hash{c}{d}}, $string1;

# print elements of hash
# (want to do this as a loop for all possible key/value pairs)
local $, = ',';
print "a, b, ";
print @{$hash{a}{b}};
print "\n";
print "c, d, ";
print @{$hash{c}{d}};
print "\n";

system ('pause');

The output from this code is shown below:

a, b, string1,string2
c, d, string2,string1
Press any key to continue . . .

I was thinking about using the each operator but it appears to only work for one dimensional hashes. (each only returns one key value pair, it does not work correctly when there are 2 keys involved)

How can I streamline this code to traverse through the hash in a loop and print the desired output regardless of how big my hash gets?

  • 2
    Its should perhaps be added that in case you do not know, there are modules which will print data structures for you, such as Data::Dumper (core module), or Data::Dump. E.g. use Data::Dumper; print Dumper \%hash; – TLP Sep 10 '14 at 16:07
1

Sounds like you need a nested loop ... there's likely a way to do this with map that is harder to remember and less readable ;-) (speaking only for myself of course - I look forward to seeing a map solution appear here!):

#!perl -l
my %hash = ();
$hash{key1}{key2} = ['value1', 'value2', 'value3',];

for my $outer (keys %hash) { 
    for my $inner (keys $hash{$outer}) { 
       print join(', ', $outer, $inner, @{ $hash{$outer}{$inner} } )
    } 
}

output:

key1, key2, value1, value2, value3

There's also Data::Printer, Data::Seek,Data::Dive and several other convenience modules if things are really complicated. Some require the use of hash references though which may complicate a simpler solution or make a larger and more difficult problem more easily possible ...

Cheers,

EDIT: moved "nested map" into a separate answer.

  • I agree, I would also love to see a map solution here. :) Of the solutions posted this seems to be the simplest and most straightforward so far. – tjwrona1992 Sep 10 '14 at 17:49
  • @tjwrona1992 ... I edited in a map "answer" to my response ... punishing me if you see fit! :-) – G. Cito Sep 10 '14 at 20:34
  • Your code isn't actually printing out the answer that the OP asked for, unfortunately... :\ I've added a map version to my answer (though I do like the anonymous sub in yours!). – i alarmed alien Sep 10 '14 at 20:51
  • @tjwrona1992 maybe the map approach would benefit from 5.20 style postfix derferencing ;-) – G. Cito Sep 10 '14 at 20:52
  • 1
    @G.Cito His or her application. ;) – i alarmed alien Sep 10 '14 at 22:32
5

Using each works perfectly fine even for a multilevel hash, you just have to make sure that the argument is a hash. Here is an example of how you can do it. I also showed how I would initialize that hash of yours.

use strict;
use warnings;
use v5.14;

my $string1 = "string1";
my $string2 = "string2";
my %hash = (
    a => { 
        b => [ $string1, $string2 ],
    },
    c => {
        d => [ $string2, $string1 ],
    }
);

for my $key (keys %hash) {
    while (my ($k, $v) = each %{ $hash{$key} }) {
        say join ", ", $key, $k, @$v;
    }
}

Output:

c, d, string2, string1
a, b, string1, string2

Note the simplicity of using @$v to get to your innermost array, rather than the somewhat cumbersome alternative @{ $hash{$key}{$k} }.

  • +1 @$v is succinct - but if one is a follower of PBP @{ $hash{$key}{$k} } is clearer ;-) I wonder how postfix dereferencing will play out in syntax usage and practice. – G. Cito Sep 10 '14 at 21:00
4

This is tidiest with a recursive subroutine, and since it will only recurse a few time it isn't a wasteful solution.

use strict;
use warnings;

my %hash;
my ($string1, $string2) = qw/ string1 string2 /;

push @{$hash{a}{b}}, $string1;
push @{$hash{a}{b}}, $string2;
push @{$hash{c}{d}}, $string2;
push @{$hash{c}{d}}, $string1;

print_data(\%hash);

sub print_data {
    my ($ref, $prefix) = (@_, '');

   if (ref $ref eq 'ARRAY') {
      print $prefix, join(', ', @$ref), "\n";
   }
   else {
      print_data($ref->{$_}, "$prefix$_, ") for sort keys %$ref;
   }
}

output

a, b, string1, string2
c, d, string2, string1
3

You haven't stated why you want to print the contents of your HoHoA (hash of hash of arrays). If it's for debugging purposes I'd use either Data::Dumper (core) or Data::Dump (on CPAN).

use Data::Dumper qw(Dumper);
print Dumper \%hash;

or

use Data::Dump qw(pp);
pp \%hash;

Assuming that there's a reason you want the output formatted per your sample (and that it's always and only a HoHoA) I'd use a nested loop:

while (my ($ok, $ov) = each %hash) {
    while (my ($ik, $iv) = each %$ov) {
        say join ',', @$iv;
    }
}

I don't recommend using map. It's best used for list transformation rather than flow control and it's awkward to keep track of the outer and inner keys with nested map blocks both using $_ for different things. Because you and G. Cito expressed interest in seeing one, though, here it is:

say foreach map {
    my $o = $_;
    map {
        my $i = $_;
        join ',', $o, $i, @{$hash{$o}{$i}}
    } keys %{$hash{$o}};
} keys %hash;
  • nice :-) I just did a double map (see above) ... which as I mentioned seems less readable (to me) and no more efficient but errm seems cool heh ;-) Cheers. – G. Cito Sep 10 '14 at 20:41
  • Isn't the foreach surplus to requirements since you've got map there doing basically the same job? – i alarmed alien Sep 10 '14 at 20:55
  • @Michael Carman the HoHoA is mirroring the structure of a database that I am working with and the arrays store strings of values to import into the database at the end of running my script. +1 for the nice solution using each though :) – tjwrona1992 Sep 11 '14 at 12:11
2

To print a hash of hash of arrays, you can iterate through the data structure using foreach or for my:

# keys of the outer hash
foreach my $oh (keys %hash) {
    # keys of the inner hash
    foreach my $ih (keys %{$hash{$oh}}) {
        # $hash{$oh}{$ih} is the array, so it can be printed thus:
        print join(", ", $oh, $ih, @{$hash{$oh}{$ih}}) . "\n";

        # or you can iterate through the items like this:
        # foreach my $arr (@{$hash{$oh}{$ih}})
        # {   doSomethingTo($arr); }

    }
}

And for all you cartography fans, here's a map version:

map { my $oh = $_; 
    map { say join( ", ", $oh, $_, @{$hash{$oh}{$_}} )  } keys %{$hash{$_}}
} keys %hash;
1

I've been thinking about it and came up with one possible solution. If anyone has a more elegant solution I would love to see it. Thanks!

Here is the solution I came up with:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

# initialize hash
my %hash = ();
my $string1 = "string1";
my $string2 = "string2";

# push strings onto arrays stored in hash
push @{$hash{a}{b}}, $string1;
push @{$hash{a}{b}}, $string2;
push @{$hash{c}{d}}, $string2;
push @{$hash{c}{d}}, $string1;

# prints hash of hash of arrays in a loop :)
my @keys1 = keys %hash;
for my $key1 (@keys1) {
    my @keys2 = keys $hash{$key1};
    for my $key2 (@keys2) {
        local $" = ', ';
        print "$key1, $key2, @{$hash{$key1}{$key2}}";
        print "\n";
    }
}

system ('pause');

This solution doesn't care about the order of the keys though so it will print in a random order.

Output:

c, d, string2, string1
a, b, string1, string2
Press any key to continue . . .
  • 1
    If you only use the keys once, there's no need to store them in arrays, i.e. you can simply do for my $key1 (keys %hash) { ... } – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Sep 10 '14 at 14:38
  • 1
    You can only call keys on a hash, so your inner loop should actually be for my $key2 ( keys %{ $hash{$key1} } ) { ... } – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Sep 10 '14 at 14:58
  • 1
    @ThisSuitIsBlackNot It is documented in perldoc -f keys: Starting with Perl 5.14, keys can take a scalar EXPR, which must contain a reference to an unblessed hash or array. The argument will be dereferenced automatically. This aspect of keys is considered highly experimental. The exact behaviour may change in a future version of Perl. – TLP Sep 10 '14 at 15:03
  • 1
    So, in other words, you can use a hash ref, but its better not to. – TLP Sep 10 '14 at 15:04
  • 1
    @TLP Thanks. Somebody mentioned that before and I completely forgot about it. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Sep 10 '14 at 15:07
1

I asked for it :-( ... a "nested map" (??).

#!perl -l
my %hash = ();
$hash{key1}{key2} = ['value1', 'value2', 'value3',];
map{ &{ sub{
   map{ print for @{$hash{$_[0]}{$_}}} keys $hash{$_} }}($_)} keys %hash;

output:

value1
value2
value3

NB: I think technically (behind the scenes) it's still a loop and no more efficient. It seems that if you "nest" the calls to map and wrap the inner map{} with an anonymous sub (the {& sub { .. bit) then you can reference the outer map topic values via @_ (i.e. in $_[0] as they come in to the inner map ... but only if they are in list context ($_) ... errm (?!?) OK I'm just grasping here.

Anyway, it works but looks messier than it should - possibly because it is an "anti-pattern". One benefit is that it makes "nested for loops" seem much less messy and easier to read.

  • 1
    Nice and confusing. Just the way I like it :) – tjwrona1992 Jan 6 '15 at 15:49
  • :) I must be missing something, but in perl6 it appears this works: my %h = key1 => key2 => <value1 value2 value3> ; "{%h.kv} ".say;. – G. Cito Jan 6 '15 at 19:22
  • Woah now that's some strange Perl code! What are the "."s for? I've never seen %h.kv or a quote with a .say after it. – tjwrona1992 Jan 6 '15 at 19:44
  • perl6 ... very different :-) – G. Cito Jan 6 '15 at 21:38

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