12

I have a matrix, data.mat, that looks like:

A B C D E  
45 43 45 65 23   
12 45 56 NA NA   
13 4  34 12 NA  

I am trying to turn this into a list of lists, where each row is one list within a bigger list. I do the following:

list <- tapply(data.mat,rep(1:nrow(data.mat),ncol(data.mat)),function(i)i)

which gives me a list of lists, with NAs included, such as:

$`1`  
 [1]  45 43 45 65 23  
$`2`  
 [1]  12 45 56 NA NA  
$`3`  
 [1]  13 4 34 12 NA  

But what I want is:

$`1`  
 [1]  45 43 45 65 23  
$`2`  
 [1]  12 45 56   
$`3`  
 [1]  13 4 34 12   

Is there a good way to remove the NAs either during the tapply call or after the fact?

2
  • 2
    Don't use variable names like list as it's used in R for lists.
    – Brouwer
    Commented Sep 11, 2014 at 0:43
  • Good point. I wouldn't normally--I was just trying to make it generic for the example. But that is good to remember, since I'm sloppy about naming conventions sometimes. Commented Sep 11, 2014 at 2:13

3 Answers 3

27

Sure, you can use lapply like this:

> lapply(list, function(x) x[!is.na(x)])
$`1`
[1] 45 43 45 65 23

$`2`
[1] 12 45 56

$`3`
[1] 13  4 34 12
2
  • How could I instead replace all NAs with 0 vs removing them? Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 19:41
  • lapply(list, function(x) { x[is.na(x)] <- 0; return(x) }) (not tested)
    – rsoren
    Commented Mar 17, 2018 at 23:20
9

Your sample data:

data.mat <- data.matrix(read.table(text = "A B C D E  
45 43 45 65 23   
12 45 56 NA NA   
13 4  34 12 NA ", header = TRUE))

To split by row:

row.list <- split(data.mat, row(data.mat))

To remove NAs:

Map(Filter, list(Negate(is.na)), row.list)

or

lapply(row.list, Filter, f = Negate(is.na))

Everything in one shot:

Map(Filter, list(Negate(is.na)), split(data.mat, row(data.mat)))
1
  • The benefit of this method is it outputs the same list format even if there are no NAs in the data.
    – tospig
    Commented Feb 21, 2015 at 3:36
4

You could do this:

apply(data.mat, 1, function(x) x[!is.na(x)])

Output:

[[1]]
 A  B  C  D  E 
45 43 45 65 23 

[[2]]
 A  B  C 
12 45 56 

[[3]]
 A  B  C  D 
13  4 34 12

If you don't want names:

apply(data.mat, 1, function(x) unname(x[!is.na(x)]))

If there is the possibility that every row has the same number of NAs, it will be safer to use:

split(apply(data.mat, 1, function(x) unname(x[!is.na(x)])), 1:nrow(data.mat))
8
  • Just beat me to it :)
    – rsoren
    Commented Sep 11, 2014 at 0:40
  • 1
    lapply(split(data.mat, 1:nrow(data.mat)), function(x) unname(x[!is.na(x)])) is a bit more identical to the "desired" output, but both contain the same info.
    – MrFlick
    Commented Sep 11, 2014 at 0:40
  • @MrFlick True. I feel no shame in taking the unname part to match that aspect better, but you may want to post yours as a separate answer. Or I could add it to mine if you aren't inclined. I have no shame. ;)
    – Jota
    Commented Sep 11, 2014 at 0:51
  • Personally, i think your specific shape is probably more useful and representative of the real data. I'm fine leaving it as a comment.
    – MrFlick
    Commented Sep 11, 2014 at 0:53
  • 1
    @tospig Yes, you need the x in front there. I'm not entirely sure what happened with the edits. I must have made a mistake.
    – Jota
    Commented Feb 20, 2015 at 3:08

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