2

I've read that you shouldn't trust on the underlying implementation of an enum on being either signed or unsigned. From this I have concluded that you should always cast the enum value to the type that it's being compared against. Like this:

enum MyEnum { MY_ENUM_VALUE = 0 };

int i = 1;
if (i > static_cast<int>(MY_ENUM_VALUE))
{
    // do stuff
}

unsigned int u = 2;
if (u > static_cast<unsigned int>(MY_ENUM_VALUE))
{
    // do more stuff
}

Is this the best practice?

Edit: Does the situation change if the enum is anonymous?

2

An enum is an integer so you can compare it against any other integer, and even floats. The compiler will automatically convert both integers to the largest, or the enum to a double before the compare.

Now, if your enumeration is not supposed to represent a number per se, you may want to consider creating a class instead:

enum class some_name { MY_ENUM_VALUE, ... };

int i;
if(i == static_cast<int>(some_name::MY_ENUM_VALUE))
{
    ...
}

In that case you need a cast because an enum class is not viewed as an integer by default. This helps quite a bit to avoid bugs in case you were to misuse an enum value...

1

Short answer: Yes

enum is signed int type, but they get implicitly cast into unsigned int. Your compiler might give a warning without explicit casting, but its still very commonly used. however you should explicitly cast to make it clear to maintainers.

And of course, explicit cast will be must when its a strongly typed enum.

  • 1
    "enum is signed int type, but they get implicitly cast into unsigned int" This is wrong. The underlying type of an unscoped enum is an integer type that can fit the largest enumerator. This means that if it is bigger than INT_MAX it can be unsigned int, long, unsigned long, etc. And it is implicitly cast to the smallest integer type that can fit the largest enumerator (which isn't always unsigned int). – Simple Sep 11 '14 at 8:55
0

Best practice is not to write

int i = 1;
if (i > static_cast<int>(MY_ENUM_VALUE))
{
    // do stuff
}

instead write

MyEnumValue i = MY_ENUM_VALUE ;
...
if ( i > MY_ENUM_VALUE ) {..}

But if - as in your example - you only have one value in your enum it is better to declare it as a constant instead of an enum.

  • I agree that this situation mostly arises when a value that should have been defined as a constant is defined in an enum. – khuttun Sep 11 '14 at 8:45

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