5

I have a function like this:

public async Task<SomeViewModel> SampleFunction()
{
    var data = service.GetData();
    var myList = new List<SomeViewModel>();

    myList.AddRange(data.select(x => new SomeViewModel
    {
        Id = x.Id,
        DateCreated = x.DateCreated,
        Data = await service.GetSomeDataById(x.Id)
    }

    return myList;
}

My await isn't working as it can only be used in a method or lambda marked with the async modifier. Where do I place the async with this function?

  • It's unlikely you can do this directly, because Enumerable.Select() is not an async method. – cdhowie Sep 11 '14 at 14:05
  • service.GetSomeDataByID is probably defined something like public object GetSomeDataByID(int Id) If it's not defined with the async keyword you cannot use await to call it. It would need to be defined as public async object GetSomeDataByID(int Id) – Nick Sep 11 '14 at 14:09
  • It is defined 'public async Task<string> GetSomeDataById(int Id)' which works everywhere else. Just not inside this AddRange Select statement – Ben Sep 11 '14 at 14:11
  • @Nick You can't await an object. It would need to be Task<object>. However, Selman22 has given the correct answer anyway. – Daniel Kelley Sep 11 '14 at 14:13
  • 1
    @Nick Because those who are asking a question gain more knowledge from technically correct answers, as opposed to vague ones. – Daniel Kelley Sep 11 '14 at 14:19
10

You can only use await inside an async method/delegate. In this case you must mark that lambda expression as async.

But wait, there's more...

Select is from the pre-async era and so it doesn't handle async lambdas (in your case it would return IEnumerable<Task<SomeViewModel>> instead of IEnumerable<SomeViewModel> which is what you actually need).

You can however add that functionality yourself (preferably as an extension method), but you need to consider whether you wish to await each item before moving on to the next (sequentialy) or await all items together at the end (concurrently).

Sequential async

static async Task<TResult[]> SelectAsync<TItem, TResult>(this IEnumerable<TItem> enumerable, Func<TItem, Task<TResult>> selector)
{
    var results = new List<TResult>();
    foreach (var item in enumerable)
    {
        results.Add(await selector(item));
    }
    return results.ToArray();
}

Concurrent async

static Task<TResult[]> SelectAsync<TItem, TResult>(this IEnumerable<TItem> enumerable, Func<TItem, Task<TResult>> selector)
{
    return Task.WhenAll(enumerable.Select(selector));
}

Usage

public Task<SomeViewModel[]> SampleFunction()
{
    return service.GetData().SelectAsync(async x => new SomeViewModel
    {
        Id = x.Id,
        DateCreated = x.DateCreated,
        Data = await service.GetSomeDataById(x.Id)
    }
}
4

You're using await inside of a lambda, and that lambda is going to be transformed into its own separate named method by the compiler. To use await it must itself be async, and not just be defined in an async method. When you make the lambda async you now have a sequence of tasks that you want to translate into a sequence of their results, asynchronously. Task.WhenAll does exactly this, so we can pass our new query to WhenAll to get a task representing our results, which is exactly what this method wants to return:

public Task<SomeViewModel[]> SampleFunction()
{
    return Task.WhenAll(service.GetData().Select(
        async x => new SomeViewModel
    {
        Id = x.Id,
        DateCreated = x.DateCreated,
        Data = await service.GetSomeDataById(x.Id)
    }));
}
2

Though maybe too heavyweight for your use case, using TPL Dataflow will give you finer control over your async processing.

public async Task<List<SomeViewModel>> SampleFunction()
{
    var data = service.GetData();

    var transformBlock = new TransformBlock<X, SomeViewModel>(
        async x => new SomeViewModel
        {
            Id = x.Id,
            DateCreated = x.DateCreated,
            Data = await service.GetSomeDataById(x.Id)
        },
        new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions
        {
            // Let 8 "service.GetSomeDataById" calls run at once.
            MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 8
        });

    var result = new List<SomeViewModel>();

    var actionBlock = new ActionBlock<SomeViewModel>(
        vm => result.Add(vm));

    transformBlock.LinkTo(actionBlock,
        new DataflowLinkOptions { PropagateCompletion = true });

    foreach (var x in data)
    {
        transformBlock.Post(x);
    }
    transformBlock.Complete();

    await actionBlock.Completion;

    return result;
}

This could be substantially less long-winded if service.GetData() returned an IObservable<X> and this method returned an IObservable<SomeViewModel>.

  • All that you're using the TPL dataflow here is to take a sequence of tasks and create a task representing the sequence of the results. You can do this all with a single method call, Task.WhenAll, as seen in my answer. – Servy Sep 11 '14 at 14:33
  • @Servy It's doing slightly more than that. The "finer control" is in the specification of the ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions on the TransformBlock. For example, if you're hitting a web service (via service.GetSomeDataById) that can handle 8 concurrent requests just as quickly as 1, this will run 8 times faster. Your implementation is properly async, but it still performs the calls to service.GetSomeDataById serially. – Timothy Shields Sep 11 '14 at 14:44
  • @Servy My last paragraph was also alluding to the code becoming drastically shorter if you use IObservable<T> for your "async-computed collections" rather than IEnumerable<T> or List<T>. :) If I were to do this, I'd probably refactor the method to operate that way. – Timothy Shields Sep 11 '14 at 14:47
  • The code in my answer isn't serial, it is doing the queries in parallel. – Servy Sep 11 '14 at 14:50
  • @Servy Oh you're right. It's not rate-limited though, which admittedly is probably not an issue in this case. – Timothy Shields Sep 11 '14 at 14:53

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