3

I am quite new to ANTLR, so this is likely a simple question.
I have defined a simple grammar which is supposed to include arithmetic expressions with numbers and identifiers (strings that start with a letter and continue with one or more letters or numbers.)

The grammar looks as follows:

grammar while;

@lexer::header {
  package ConFreeG;
}  

@header {
  package ConFreeG;
  
  import ConFreeG.IR.*;
}

@parser::members {
}

arith:
    term
    | '(' arith ( '-' | '+' | '*' ) arith ')'  
    ;
    
term  returns [AExpr a]:    
    NUM
    {
        int n = Integer.parseInt($NUM.text);
        a = new Num(n);
    }
    | IDENT
    {
        a = new Var($IDENT.text);
    }
    ;

fragment LOWER : ('a'..'z');
fragment UPPER : ('A'..'Z');
fragment NONNULL : ('1'..'9');
fragment NUMBER : ('0' | NONNULL);
IDENT  : ( LOWER | UPPER ) ( LOWER | UPPER | NUMBER )*;
NUM    : '0' | NONNULL NUMBER*;

fragment NEWLINE:'\r'? '\n';
WHITESPACE  :   ( ' ' | '\t' | NEWLINE )+ { $channel=HIDDEN; };

I am using ANTLR v3 with the ANTLR IDE Eclipse plugin. When I parse the expression (8 + a45) using the interpreter, only part of the parse tree is generated:

alt text

Why does the second term (a45) not get parsed? The same happens if both terms are numbers.

2
  • Which is your starting rule for parsing?
    – Gokul
    Apr 5 '10 at 20:07
  • I select arith as the parsing rule when using the Interpreter. Apr 5 '10 at 21:48
4

You'll want to create a parser rule that has an EOF (end of file) token in it so that the parser will be forced to go through the entire token stream.

Add this rule to your grammar:

parse
  :  arith EOF
  ;

and let the interpreter start at that rule instead of the arith rule:

alt text

1
  • That doesn't seem very intuitive, but it did the trick :) Thanks! Apr 6 '10 at 10:04

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