114

I have a font-face in my program generated from Font Squirrel I just can't get it to work in IIS, it works in localhost. I added application/font-woff article to my MIME Types but it still doesn't want to work.

Context
--Fonts
----font location
--css files

CSS

@font-face {
    font-family: 'wallStreetFont';
    src: url('Fonts/subway-webfont.eot');
    src: url('Fonts/subway-webfont.eot?#iefix') format('embedded-opentype'),
         url('Fonts/subway-webfont.woff2') format('woff2'),
         url('Fonts/subway-webfont.woff') format('woff'),
         url('Fonts/subway-webfont.ttf') format('truetype');
    font-weight: normal;
    font-style: normal;
}

EDIT CURRENT MIME

I am using the default IIS 8 MIME font/x-woff

  • How are you calling it in? Did you try the sample output in the Font Squirrel zip? – Aibrean Sep 11 '14 at 20:56
  • If you are using IIS 8 you shouldn't have to add a mime type in your web config for WOFF. In fact it would more likely error for having a duplicate. – Colin Bacon Sep 11 '14 at 21:03
  • @Aibrean yes the sample output works – joetinger Sep 11 '14 at 21:07
  • @ColinBacon I read that after I posted. So I currenly have font/x-woff , this is inherited from IIS 8.0 . But still no luck on getting the correct font – joetinger Sep 11 '14 at 21:09
249

Great to see WOFF2 being included in Font Squirrel fonts! Whilst IIS 8 does not need a mime type added for WOFF it will need one for WOFF2. The W3C recommends:

application/font-woff2

For more info on WOFF2 see here.

To add the mime type in IIS, modify your Web.Config as follows:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>
  <!-- ... -->
  <system.webServer>
    <!-- ... -->
    <staticContent>
      <!-- ... -->
      <mimeMap fileExtension=".woff2" mimeType="application/font-woff2" />
  • 2
    I added woff2 but still nothing – joetinger Sep 11 '14 at 21:17
  • 3
    If you look in your dev tools. Are you getting a 404 when it tries to get the font file? Is so check the path is correct and that you have permissions to browse to it in your browser. – Colin Bacon Sep 11 '14 at 21:30
  • Yes it does, http://192.168.72.196:85/bundles/Fonts/subway-webfont.woff2 I'm not sure where they are getting the bundles folder from though. Any idea? – joetinger Sep 12 '14 at 12:35
  • 3
    I assume you are using ASP.NET bundling and minification. If you set this in your bundle config BundleTable.EnableOptimizations = true. Your local host should behave the same as on your production server. – Colin Bacon Sep 12 '14 at 12:43
  • 1
    Thanks for all the help it is now working. It was a combination of the woff2 and the 404 error, which ended up being a misspelling in my bundle. Thank you! – joetinger Sep 12 '14 at 13:18
73

In order to make woff and woff2 fonts to properly work in IIS you should add the following MIME types to the Web.Config file.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>  
  <system.webServer>    
    <staticContent>
        <remove fileExtension=".woff" />
        <remove fileExtension=".woff2" />
        <mimeMap fileExtension=".woff" mimeType="application/x-font-woff" />
        <mimeMap fileExtension=".woff2" mimeType="application/font-woff2" />
    </staticContent>

If you still face the 404 error on Google Chrome you should clear your browser cache before reloading the page.

  • 2
    The spec is now recommending mimeType for woff to be application/font-woff. – Steven Apr 22 '15 at 17:26
  • 2
    I was only getting a .woff2 404 issue and this worked for me. I only used the lines pertaining to woff2 – Francisc0 Jul 14 '15 at 14:49
24

Note that it is also possible to configure MIME types within IIS Manager. Just select the website and then double click on the MIME Types icon under IIS in the main pane.

enter image description here

You should then see a list of all of the existing MIME Types and be able to add new ones using the Add... link in the right pane.

  • 2
    why not use web.config,?!! – Mojtaba Pourmirzaei Dec 24 '16 at 6:14
  • 7
    @MojtabaPourmirzaei Because not everybody is a sysadmin. That is the whole reason IIS has UI. – Alph.Dev Feb 10 '17 at 12:06
  • If you're deploying a non-.NET website in IIS, you need to do it this way (e.g. an Angular app). – Jon Kruger Dec 4 '17 at 19:21

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