5

This question already has an answer here:

Can someone explain why there is a difference in behavior here?

perl -E 'say sprintf("%.2f",5.555);'
5.55    

perl -E 'say sprintf("%.2f",0.555);'
0.56  

I have read that sprintf() rounds up if the following digits is 5 or greater. So why doesn't it round up to 0.56 in the second case?

marked as duplicate by Miller perl Sep 12 '14 at 8:56

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  • 1
    Very good answers are here stackoverflow.com/q/24493228/632407 – jm666 Sep 12 '14 at 8:00
  • 1
    On a related note, sprintf rounds to even, so sprintf '%.0f', 0.5 gives 0 and sprintf '%.0f', 1.5 gives 2 even though 0.5 and 1.5 can be represented exactly as a floating point number. – ikegami Sep 12 '14 at 15:52
9

The closest IEEE 754 64-bit binary floating point number to 0.555 is 0.55500000000000004884981308350688777863979339599609375. It is very slightly closer to 0.56 than to 0.55.

The closest IEEE 754 64-bit binary floating point number to 5.555 is 5.55499999999999971578290569595992565155029296875. It is very slightly closer to 5.55 than to 5.56.

In each case, the output is the nearest decimal with 2 decimal places to the actual value of the internal number.

As Pascal Cuoq says in a comment, 0.555 is in the binade [0.5 … 1), in which representable floating-point numbers are separated by 2-53. By contrast, 5.555 is in the binade [4 … 8), in which representable floating-point numbers are separated by 2-50. That is why the fractional parts are different for 0.555 and 5.555.

  • +1.How did you know about this representation? – Jim Sep 12 '14 at 7:52
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    @Jim I used Java: System.out.println(new BigDecimal(0.555));, but there are many ways of doing it, including web sites. – Patricia Shanahan Sep 12 '14 at 7:54
  • I don't understand what this ` 0.555 is in the binade [0.5 … 1),` means. Can you please explain it to me? – Jim Sep 12 '14 at 8:17
  • @Jim See binade. It is just a range of numbers with the same exponent in IEEE floating point. – Patricia Shanahan Sep 12 '14 at 8:23
  • Great answer, +1! – Adrian Frühwirth Sep 12 '14 at 8:29
5

Because printf rounds the value, just try:

perl -e 'printf("%.25f", 5.555)'

gives:

5.5549999999999997157829057

rounded to 5.55 with printf('%.2f', 5.55)

and

perl -e 'printf("%.25f", 0.555)'

gives

0.5550000000000000488498131

rounded to 0.56 with printf('%.2f', 0.55)

  • Why did you do .25f? How did you choose this 25? – Jim Sep 12 '14 at 7:53
  • @Jim: It's just an example to be sure to have a lot of decimal, you could do the same with %.10 – Toto Sep 12 '14 at 7:56
  • +1.So basically the idea was to use a big formatter so that the number expands to see the actual representation? – Jim Sep 12 '14 at 8:16
  • @Jim: yes it is. – Toto Sep 12 '14 at 9:22
1

If you want more consistent results, check Math::Round

perl -MMath::Round=:all -E 'say nearest(.01, 0.555)'
0.56

perl -MMath::Round=:all -E 'say nearest(.01, 5.555)'
5.56
  • Is this library active?It was created in 2000.Sorry but due to my background I don't know how the perl libraries are maintained/supported – Jim Sep 12 '14 at 7:53
  • @Jim it was updated after that search.cpan.org/~grommel/Math-Round-0.06 – Сухой27 Sep 12 '14 at 7:56
  • Even the update is in 2006.How can one know if it is actively used by many users? – Jim Sep 12 '14 at 7:57
  • It's being used by these other modules. – tobyink Sep 12 '14 at 9:26
  • @Jim Just because a module hasn't been updated in a while doesn't mean that it's not maintained. Often it means that the module Just Works and hasn't needed any updates. When you're not sure, also look at the CPAN Testers results for the module (in this case, 7315 passes and 1 failure) and the active bug reports. Both of these are available from the sidebar if you look at the documentation on metacpan. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Sep 12 '14 at 14:38

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