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I have an interface, IDetail, and a class Detail that solely implements IDetail. In the Detail class, an implemented property, ObjectId, is set to a value. In both the interface and the class, the property is implemented as a simple get/set. However, when accessed through the interface, the property returns null. The Detail object is actually passed as a generic argument, where T is IDetail. Is this some sort of bug in .NET? Where would I start to try and figure this out?

This is what the immediate window shows:

(detail as IDetail).ObjectId
null
(detail as Detail).ObjectId
"..."

Here's the code:

public interface IDetail
{
    string ObjectId { get; set; }
}

public class Detail : IDetail
{
    public string ObjectId { get; set; }
}

public class SomeClass
{
    public void SomeMethod()
    {
        SomeOtherClass.SomeOtherMethod(new Detail { ObjectId = "..." });
    }
}

public class SomeOtherClass<T> where T : IDetail
{
    public static void SomeOtherMethod<T>(T detail)
    {
        DoSomething(detail.ObjectId); // ObjectId is null here???
    }
}

closed as off-topic by Dan Puzey, Pierre-Luc Pineault, asawyer, Aron, Eugene Podskal Sep 12 '14 at 17:18

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Dan Puzey, Pierre-Luc Pineault, asawyer, Aron, Eugene Podskal
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1

I figured it out as I was typing up the question. I feel so dumb!

Turns out in a hurry I actually implemented my interface as a class:

public class IDetail
{
    public string ObjectId { get; set; }
}

That would do it!

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