1

I am trying to build a model to predict if the salary of a job description is above or below the 75th percentile (above 1, below 0) My data has about 250,000 rows and its very hard to tokenize all the text from the job descriptions. My code seems to work fine, but it takes insane amounts of time to do it above 100 rows. I need to find a way to make it more efficient so that I can include more rows to my prediction.

import random
import nltk
import pandas
import csv
import numpy as np

io = pandas.read_csv('Train_rev1.csv',sep=',',usecols=(2,10), nrows=501)
#converted = df.apply(lambda io : int(io[0]))
data = [np.array(x) for x in io.values]

random.shuffle(data)
size = int(len(data) * 0.6)
test_set, train_set = data[size:], data[:size]
train_set = np.array(train_set)
test_set = np.array(test_set)
x = train_set[:,1]
Sal75=np.percentile(x,75)
y = test_set[:,1]
Test75=np.percentile(y,75)

for i in range(len(train_set[:,1])):
    if train_set[i,1]>=Sal75:
        train_set[i,1]=1
    else:
        train_set[i,1]=0

for i in range(len(test_set[:,1])):
    if test_set[i,1]>=Test75:
        test_set[i,1]=1
    else:
        test_set[i,1]=0

train_setT = [tuple(x) for x in train_set]
test_setT = [tuple(x) for x in test_set]



from nltk.tokenize import word_tokenize
all_words = set(word.lower() for passage in train_setT for word in word_tokenize(passage[0]))
t = [({word: (word in word_tokenize(x[0])) for word in all_words}, x[1]) for x in train_setT]

classifier = nltk.NaiveBayesClassifier.train(t)

all_words2 = set(word.lower() for passage in test_setT for word in word_tokenize(passage[0]))
tt = [({word: (word in word_tokenize(x[0])) for word in all_words}, x[1]) for x in test_setT]


print nltk.classify.accuracy(classifier, tt)
classifier.show_most_informative_features(20)
testres = []
predres = []
for i in range(len(tt)):
    testres.append(tt[i][1])
for i in range(len(tt)):
    z = classifier.classify(tt[i][0])
    predres.append(z)
from nltk.metrics import ConfusionMatrix
cm = nltk.ConfusionMatrix(testres, predres)
print(cm)

The csv file was extracted from Kaggle.Use Train_rev1

  • 1
    did you profile your code and see where its bottleneck is? – Dalek Sep 12 '14 at 21:38
  • Everything runs smoothly until it starts tokenizing each job description. – Rodolfo Soto Sep 12 '14 at 21:41
  • @Dalek The botleneck starts when the words begin to get tokenized. I wonder if creating a data frame or a dictionary instead of a tuple would increase efficiency?! I can't figure out how to code that though. – Rodolfo Soto Sep 12 '14 at 22:35
1

After you have split the data into 60% and 40% You can do the following. This will require new tools, and perhaps not NLTK.

import random
import nltk
import pandas
import csv
import numpy as np
from sklearn.naive_bayes import MultinomialNB
from sklearn.feature_extraction.text import TfidfVectorizer
from sklearn import metrics
from operator import itemgetter
from sklearn.metrics import classification_report
train_setT = [tuple(x) for x in train_set]
test_setT = [tuple(x) for x in test_set]


train_set = np.array([''.join(el[0]) for el in train_setT])
test_set = np.array([''.join(el[0]) for el in test_setT])

y_train = np.array([el[1] for el in train_setT])
y_test = np.array([el[1] for el in test_setT])

vectorizer = TfidfVectorizer(min_df=2,ngram_range=(1, 2), strip_accents='unicode', norm='l2')

X_train = vectorizer.fit_transform(train_set)
X_test = vectorizer.transform(test_set)

nb_classifier = MultinomialNB().fit(X_train, y_train)

y_nb_predicted = nb_classifier.predict(X_test)


print metrics.confusion_matrix(y_test, y_nb_predicted)
print classification_report(y_test, y_nb_predicted)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.