5

if I have a javascript ES6 class like this:

import $ from "jquery"; 

export class test {

  constructor() {
    this.es6 = 'yay';
  }

  writeLine(text){
    console.log(text);
  }

  getTestData(){
    writeLine('writeLine call'); // <-- can not call writeLine ??
    $.get('/test', function(data){
        console.log(data);
        console.log(data.data);
        this.es6 = data.data;
        debugger
        writeLine(data.data);
    });
 }
} 

From another file I import the class and call getTestData

System.import('app/classDefinition')
.then(function(classDefinitionModul) {
   var test = new classDefinitionModul.test();
   console.log(test.es6);
   test.getTestData();
})

How can I call the method writeLine??

  • You want this.writeLine – elclanrs Sep 13 '14 at 7:27
  • for the first call it works but not for the second in the get – tire0011 Sep 13 '14 at 7:40
  • 1
    Of course, because this is not what you think it is. You have to either cache it, bind it, or use fat arrow. – elclanrs Sep 13 '14 at 7:42
7

This doesn't have anything to do with es6. In the ajax callback, this doesn't refer to the object anymore.

getTestData () {

    // this isn't java (see what I did there)
    this.writeLine('writeLine call');

    var _this = this;
    $.get('/test', function (resp) {
        _this.writeLine(resp.data);
    });

    // or
    $.get('/test', function (resp) {
        this.writeLine(resp.data);
    }.bind(this));

    // or
    $.get('/test', resp => this.writeLine(resp.data))
}
  • 5
    Or $.get('/test', data => this.writeLine(data.data)) – elclanrs Sep 13 '14 at 8:25
  • @elclanrs I'm not up to date with this witchcraft. – Ilia Choly Sep 13 '14 at 8:28
  • 3
    => is like function(){}.bind(this) – elclanrs Sep 13 '14 at 8:40
  • 1
    This is not an answer to the question and does not address: "writeLine('writeLine call'); // <-- can not call writeLine ??" – Adrian Bartholomew Jul 18 '15 at 14:28
  • 1
    One of my realizations from this is that you need to be in the scope of 'this' when you use =>, meaning call your methods using => from the constructor. This way they retain lexical scope to their peer methods. You can't just throw => into a method that's already lost the objects 'this'. – Jason Farnsworth Dec 8 '15 at 18:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.