215

I have to search through a list and replace all occurrences of one element with another. So far my attempts in code are getting me nowhere, what is the best way to do this?

For example, suppose my list has the following integers

>>> a = [1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3,4,5,1]

and I need to replace all occurrences of the number 1 with the value 10 so the output I need is

>>> a = [10, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10]

Thus my goal is to replace all instances of the number 1 with the number 10.

206
>>> a= [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1]
>>> for n, i in enumerate(a):
...   if i == 1:
...      a[n] = 10
...
>>> a
[10, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10]
  • 10
    This is a bad and very un-pythonic solution. Consider using list comprehension. – AdHominem Dec 31 '16 at 11:56
  • 141
    This is a fine if very un-pythonic solution. Consider using list comprehension. – Jean-François Corbett Feb 2 '17 at 13:35
  • Consider using list comprehension, such as is done by @outis below! – amc Feb 23 at 0:02
  • This performs better than list comprehension though doesn't it? It does in-place updates instead of generating a new list. – neverendingqs May 13 at 18:59
442

Try using a list comprehension and the ternary operator.

>>> a=[1,2,3,1,3,2,1,1]
>>> [4 if x==1 else x for x in a]
[4, 2, 3, 4, 3, 2, 4, 4]
  • 6
    But this doesn't change a though right? I think OP wanted a to change – Dula Feb 3 '16 at 23:26
  • 8
    @Dula you can do a = [4 if x==1 else x for x in a], this will effect a – Alekhya Vemavarapu Apr 11 '16 at 7:57
  • @Dula: the question is vague as to whether a should mutate, but (as Alekhya shows) it's trivial to handle either case when using a list comprehension. – outis Aug 15 '16 at 11:55
  • @outis This is brilliant thanks! – TheSteve0 Dec 28 '16 at 3:09
  • 14
    If you want to mutate a then you should do a[:] = [4 if x==1 else x for x in a] (note the full list slice). Just doing the a = will create a new list a with a different id() (identity) from the original one – Chris_Rands Apr 25 '17 at 12:15
29

List comprehension works well, and looping through with enumerate can save you some memory (b/c the operation's essentially being done in place).

There's also functional programming. See usage of map:

>>> a = [1,2,3,2,3,4,3,5,6,6,5,4,5,4,3,4,3,2,1]
>>> map(lambda x: x if x != 4 else 'sss', a)
[1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 'sss', 3, 5, 6, 6, 5, 'sss', 5, 'sss', 3, 'sss', 3, 2, 1]
  • 14
    +1. It's too bad lambda and map are considered unpythonic. – outis Apr 7 '10 at 0:02
  • 4
    I'm not sure that lambda or map is inherently unpythonic, but I'd agree that a list comprehension is cleaner and more readable than using the two of them in conjunction. – damzam Apr 7 '10 at 2:14
  • 6
    I don't consider them unpythonic myself, but many do, including Guido van Rossum (artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=98196). It's one of those sectarian things. – outis Apr 8 '10 at 1:29
25

If you have several values to replace, you can also use a dictionary:

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 5, 3, 2, 6, 1, 1]
dic = {1:10, 2:20, 3:'foo'}

print([dic.get(n, n) for n in a])

> [10, 20, 'foo', 4, 10, 5, 'foo', 20, 6, 10, 10]
  • 1
    Doesn't this throw an error if n isn't found in dic? – Neil A. Aug 17 '16 at 23:17
  • Thanks, you are right, I added a try-catch block. – roipoussiere Aug 18 '16 at 8:41
  • 2
    @user2914540 I improved your answer a bit so it works if n isn't found. I hope you don't mind. Your try/except solution wasn't good. – jrjc Aug 18 '16 at 8:48
  • 1
    @jrjc @roipoussiere for in-place replacements, the try-except is at least 50% faster! Take a look at this answer – lifebalance Nov 23 '16 at 3:25
  • 4
    if n in dic.keys() is bad performance-wise. Use if n in dic or dic.get(n,n) (default value) – Jean-François Fabre Dec 27 '16 at 22:48
9
>>> a=[1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3,4,5,1]
>>> item_to_replace = 1
>>> replacement_value = 6
>>> indices_to_replace = [i for i,x in enumerate(a) if x==item_to_replace]
>>> indices_to_replace
[0, 5, 10]
>>> for i in indices_to_replace:
...     a[i] = replacement_value
... 
>>> a
[6, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
>>> 
6
a = [1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3,4,5,1,12]
for i in range (len(a)):
    if a[i]==2:
        a[i]=123

You can use a for and or while loop; however if u know the builtin Enumerate function, then it is recommended to use Enumerate.1

  • This is the only sane (readable) way to do it when you need to do more complex operations on the list items. For example, if each list item is a long string that need some kind of search and replacement. – not2qubit Nov 19 '18 at 6:50
3

To replace easily all 1 with 10 in a = [1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3,4,5,1]one could use lambda+map combo, and 'Look, Ma, no IFs or FORs!' :

# This substitutes all '1' with '10' in list 'a' and places result in list 'c':

c = list(map(lambda b: b.replace("1","10"), a))

2

The following is a very direct method in Python 2.x

 a = [1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3,4,5,1]        #Replacing every 1 with 10
 for i in xrange(len(a)):
   if a[i] == 1:
     a[i] = 10  
 print a

This method works. Comments are welcome. Hope it helps :)

Also try understanding how outis's and damzam's solutions work. List compressions and lambda function are useful tools.

1

You can simply use list comprehension in python:

def replace_element(YOUR_LIST, set_to=NEW_VALUE):
    return [i
            if SOME_CONDITION
            else NEW_VALUE
            for i in YOUR_LIST]

for your case, where you want to replace all occurrences of 1 with 10, the code snippet will be like this:

def replace_element(YOUR_LIST, set_to=10):
    return [i
            if i != 1  # keeps all elements not equal to one
            else set_to  # replaces 1 with 10
            for i in YOUR_LIST]
  • 3
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. Please also try not to crowd your code with explanatory comments, this reduces the readability of both the code and the explanations! – Filnor May 23 '18 at 10:10

protected by Mark Rotteveel Jul 20 at 10:24

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