2

I have been crawling around on Google a bit now to find any useful examples on how to use Ninject together async/await operations. I have also tried a bit myself to find any pattern that makes this actually work without having to write a lot of code, but I haven't managed to make it work.

To take the most simple description of the basic problem is that the Entity Framework DbContext is created on a per request scope basis (it's an ASP.NET MVC app), but if you try to call any *Async methods it will fail with information that it's already working with an execution (which is obvious enough).

So, what I need is that the call Kernel.Get<MyContext>() creates unique DbContext objects using Ninject and which Ninject takes care of the lifecycle of. Using BeginBlock() or changing scope to InTransientScope() isn't really an option since the first will make the code quite heavy with seperate blocks and disposing of these and the latter set's the caller code as responsible to dispose the DbContext.

An POC example of the code I want to do:

var context1 = NinjectKernelReference.Get<MyContext>(); //I want this to be a unique reference
var context2 = NinjectKernelReference.Get<MyContext>(); //I want this to be a unique reference

var task1 = context1.Customers.Where(c => c.ZipCode == "4444")
                    .Select(c => new {
                                         c.Name,
                                         c.PhoneNumber
                                     })
                    .Take(50)
                    .ToArrayAsync();

var task2 = context2.Customers.CountAsync(c => c.ZipCode == "4444");

Task.WaitAll(task1, task2);

return new Result { task1.Result, task2.Result };

So, is there any way to solve this the "easy" way?

2
  • 1
    I think this is problematic because you might leak objects from one context into another. Which context will be updated? etc. If you want to do it this way, i would recommend creating the context by factory and managing the lifetime manually (using block which disposes it once you don't need it any more). This would at least make it clear how it works. Sep 14, 2014 at 17:00
  • As you see from my code, it's only intended to be used together with Select statement, so no update of context in these circumstances. But what do you mean with "creating the context by factory"? Do you have any examplearound this?
    – Rune G
    Sep 14, 2014 at 17:12

2 Answers 2

3

this is how you can control creation of objects yourself:

public interface IContextFactory {
    MyContext Create();
}

kernel.Bind<IContextFactory>().ToFactory // requires ninjext.extensions.factory

(Factory Extension Link)

usage:

using(var context1 = IContextFactory.Create())
using(var context2 = IContextFactory.Create())
{
    var task1 = context1.Customers.Where(c => c.ZipCode == "4444")
                .Select(c => new {
                                     c.Name,
                                     c.PhoneNumber
                                 })
                .Take(50)
                .ToArrayAsync();

    var task2 = context2.Customers.CountAsync(c => c.ZipCode == "4444");

    Task.WaitAll(task1, task2);

    return new Result { task1.Result, task2.Result };
} // context get's disposed here

note: this requires the context not be bound .InRequestScope(), otherwise, the same object will be returned for both .Create()calls. If you sometimes need them .InRequestScope() and sometimes not, you might consider using ninject contextual binding

1
  • Thanks, but this requires me to still Dispose the context myself, which was kind of what I was hoping to not be neccessary, but it seems that it cannot be done without that. After this post I realized that is was just as easy to use IKernel.BeginBlock() to create an activation block and use a using statement around that.
    – Rune G
    Sep 18, 2014 at 7:16
1

After some digging and reading the response of other users on this post, I realize that it isn't any easy way to do this.

So I decided to go for using the IKernel.BeginBlock to create a "local" Ninject scope within the Parallel thread execution where I did my logic.

It may not be so neat as I would like, but it works.

using( var block1 = NinjectKernelReference.BeginBlock())
using( var block2 = NinjectKernelReference.BeginBlock())
{
    var context1 = block1.Get<MyContext>(); 
    var context2 = block2.Get<MyContext>(); 

    var task1 = context1.Customers.Where(c => c.ZipCode == "4444")
                        .Select(c => new {
                                             c.Name,
                                             c.PhoneNumber
                                         })
                        .Take(50)
                        .ToArrayAsync();

    var task2 = context2.Customers.CountAsync(c => c.ZipCode == "4444");

    Task.WaitAll(task1, task2);

    return new Result { task1.Result, task2.Result };
}

It may not be that neat, but it works and I can't see any downsides with this (other than maybe some minor performance issues with BeginBlock and Disposing of it).

4
  • i would recommend staying clear from ActivationBlock. It has some side-effects. See for example planetgeek.ch/2012/04/23/future-of-activation-blocks (As far as i know, the changes proposed therein have not been implemented yet!). I think the current plan for Ninject is to get rid of the ActivationBlock. Sep 18, 2014 at 7:43
  • Thanks for your additions here, however I am beginning to grow pretty tired of all limitations with Ninject and threading/parallelism issues now, so it's more likley to be replaced anytime soon.
    – Rune G
    Sep 19, 2014 at 12:05
  • Well if you find some other DI-Container who's taking care of these problems for you, please, and i really mean it, tell us about it. It would be very interesting. Sep 19, 2014 at 12:25
  • 1
    Well, I am trying using AutoFac in a project and it does what I want, the DI container allocates my context and frees it when my action (it's a MVC project) ends. In the configuration I do like this: builder.RegisterType<MyDbContext>().AsSelf().PropertiesAutowired(PropertyWiringOptions.PreserveSetValues); And then in my constructor of my logic class I have two MyDbContext parameters that AutoFac automatically assigns to unique contexts, which is automatically freed when my action is returns, just as I want.
    – Rune G
    Sep 20, 2014 at 6:36

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