0

I'm told that my answer to the following question is incorrect. Am I really incorrect? I don't see how.

Assume a 1-byte signed integer using two's complement representation and the most significant bit is the sign bit. What would be the binary bit pattern in memory representing +66?

The answer is 01000010

Right?

  • i don't think you are wrong – nem035 Sep 14 '14 at 23:08
  • is +66 decimal, octal or hexadecimal? – mch Sep 15 '14 at 9:49
  • @mch when no suffix added then +66 means decadic base but yes you're right he might overlook/forget to write the base. The only other thing I can think of is LSB (least significant bit) position (on the left or right)? if LSB is on the right then it is correct otherwise it need bit reversal – Spektre Sep 15 '14 at 9:59
  • heh but on 8 bits the number is palindrome so it really does not matter – Spektre Sep 15 '14 at 11:34
  • @Spektre IMO that's the only possibility where this answer is not correct. – mch Sep 15 '14 at 16:30
0

You might be arguing with a pedant who has a detailed version of what "bit pattern in memory" means. This conversion to binary is correct, but they may want you to think about the relevance of word size, or endianness.

you could always lay out your proof:

66 / 2 = 33 R 0

33 / 2 = 16 R 1

16 / 2 = 8 R 0

8 / 2 = 4 R 0

4 / 2 = 2 R 0

2 / 2 = 1 R 0

1 / 2 = 0 R 1

(reading bottom to top) 1000010

(adding extra zero on left size to make a byte) 01000010

(sanity check) (1 * (2^6)) + (1 * (2^1)) = 64 + 2 == 66

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.