1

Found this error to be quite weird because previously my script was working and but after I moved it from the server I was working on to my local machine, it stopped working and just gave me an 'unexpected operator' error.

# Else if the script is being run in the arrayscripts directory, add /output/ ...
elif [ $basePath == "arrayscripts" ];
then
        echo "$dscr has started to run."
        cpuPath="`pwd`/output/cpu.binary"
        txtPath="`pwd`/output/cpu.txt"
        csvPath="`pwd`/output/cpu.csv"
  • You are likely running this using a POSIX shell, probably dash (default sh in Ubuntu) which doesn't support ==. See Bashisms – John B Sep 15 '14 at 11:10
  • If this shell is bash, the obvious problem is missing quotes. "$basePath" is not the same as $basePath -- unquoted, the latter can expand to any number of arguments, making what it puts in the operator position completely unpredictable. – Charles Duffy Sep 15 '14 at 21:13
  • Since you tag this bash, are you starting your script with #!/bin/bash? If not, you should. – Charles Duffy Sep 15 '14 at 21:21
  • @CharlesDuffy starting it with #!/bin/sh thought it was bash, sorry for tagging the wrong thing – Mark O'Sullivan Sep 16 '14 at 10:31
  • FYI, using `pwd` is considerably less efficient than $PWD. – Charles Duffy Sep 16 '14 at 14:30
10

If your actual shell is /bin/sh [contrary to the initial question, but as discussion commentary has made clear], use = rather than == in your test expression:

elif [ "$basePath" = arrayscripts ]

Note that the right-hand side doesn't need to be quoted in this case, since it contains no expansions and no syntactically-sensitive characters.


Alternately, if this issue is reproducible when using bash, the obvious problem is missing quotes.

Use either

[ "$basePath" = arrayscripts ] # this is POSIX compatible

or

[[ $basePath = arrayscripts ]] # this works only with bash

Otherwise, the number of arguments $basePath expands into is undefined -- it may expand into zero arguments, making the statement

[ = arrayscripts ]

...which would try to use = as a unary operator, which it isn't...

or if $basePath contained, say, "true -o bar =", it could expand into something like

[ true -o bar = arrayscripts ]

...resulting in program behavior very different from what you actually want.


Bottom line: When writing for shells which follow POSIX rules (basically, anything but zsh or fish), quote your expansions unless you have a specific and compelling reason to do otherwise. (Use of the bash/ksh extension [[ ]] provides such a reason, by introducing a context in which string-splitting of expansion results and glob expansion don't take place).

| improve this answer | |
  • For completeness, I thought I'd mention that quoting won't prevent [ = arrayscripts ] situations. What seems to be recommended is using [ ".$basePath" = .arrayscripts ] so that if basePath is undefined you're left with [ . = .arrayscripts ]. – bobpaul Mar 25 '15 at 19:55
  • 1
    @bobpaul, that claim is incorrect: [ "" = arrayscripts ] -- which [ "$emptyvar" = arrayscripts ] evaluates to -- is not a syntax error; in any POSIX-compliant shell, it correctly compares an empty string on the left to a non-empty string on the right. – Charles Duffy Mar 25 '15 at 20:05
  • @bobpaul, ...you can test this yourself: Run [ "$emptyvar" = arrayscripts ], and note the lack of any syntax error reported to stderr. – Charles Duffy Apr 1 '15 at 19:16
2

This is an error you'd get if you were executing the script with a POSIX shell like dash. dash is the default /bin/sh on some platforms such as Ubuntu and Debian.

== is specific to bash ( Bashism ) and is not compatible with POSIX shells like dash, which uses only = to test string equality.

In the context of single brackets, == and = are treated as the same operator in bash, so either can be used.

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  • Thanks for letting me know, updated the tags so I included Ubuntu which was the operating system I was using – Mark O'Sullivan Sep 15 '14 at 21:04
  • 1
    @MOS182, more important to stop tagging it bash when your shell is actually sh. – Charles Duffy Sep 15 '14 at 21:22
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    Note that although bash supports == inside [ ... ], there's no reason to actually do so. Use [[ ... == ... ]] instead. – chepner Sep 16 '14 at 12:53
0

I managed to get my script working by changing the comparison function from '==' to '=' as suggested by 'alister' in the unix and linux forums ( http://www.unix.com/shell-programming-and-scripting/141856-how-avoid-unexpected-operator-error-when-comparing-2-strings.html ) and so my script looked like this

# Else if the script is being run in the arrayscripts directory, add /output/ ...
    elif [ "$basePath" = "arrayscripts" ];
    then
            echo "$dscr has started to run."
            cpuPath="`pwd`/output/cpu.binary"
            txtPath="`pwd`/output/cpu.txt"
            csvPath="`pwd`/output/cpu.csv"

Hope that if anyone gets this same error as I did, that this answer will help them. .

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  • 5
    You posted question and answer together at same time. And since you tagged as BASH your answer is also wrong. – anubhava Sep 15 '14 at 10:56
  • 1
    Bash treats = and == the same. From man bash: The = operator is equivalent to ==. – John B Sep 15 '14 at 11:07
  • @anubhava why is my answer wrong? – Mark O'Sullivan Sep 15 '14 at 11:23
  • 1
    @JohnB: Already answered your question in his comment. – anubhava Sep 15 '14 at 11:49
  • @anubhava John has said that = and == are treated the same, in that case how is my answer wrong? Why was I getting an error when it was == and not = ? – Mark O'Sullivan Sep 15 '14 at 13:26

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