20

I'm trying to overwrite a line in PowerShell written with Write-Host (I have a process that's running in a loop and I want to show percentage updated on the screen). What I've tried to do is this:

Write-Host -NoNewline "`rWriting $outputFileName ($i/$fileCount)... $perc%"

but instead of overwriting the line it stays on the same line and appends to it.

what am I missing here?

Thanks

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  • 2
    Just a suggestion, using Write-Progress will probably do something similar to what you're trying to achieve. – arco444 Sep 15 '14 at 11:45
  • Strange. This worked ok for me... – Walter Mitty Jul 5 '15 at 17:24
  • Wrap the output in a $(...) so it is Write-Host -NoNewline $("`rWriting $outputFileName ($i/$fileCount)... $perc%") – James Mar 16 '16 at 17:44
  • As you can see, there's a pletora of ways to do the same thing, or to do similar things (which are not always desirable). You are not missing anything, since your code is correct. It works on PowerShell 5 console; maybe it was the version then, or the fact that it doesn't work on ISE. – Alan Rezende May 23 at 1:52

11 Answers 11

23

You cannot overwrite a line in a Powershell window. What you can do is blank the window with cls(Clear-Host):

# loop code
cls
Write-Host "`rWriting $outputFileName ($i/$fileCount)... $perc%"
# end loop

But what you should really be using is Write-Progress, a cmdlet built specifically for this purpose:

# loop code
Write-Progress -Activity "Writing $outputFileName" -PercentComplete $perc
# end loop

More on Write-Progress here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh849902.aspx

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  • It's not exactly what I was looking for when I wrote this post. But I did adopt your answer, since (1) I didn't know that cmdlt - so I learned something new and liked it. and (2) it does suits my needs. don't know if indeed what I was originally looking for is possible or not (according to what I've read it should be) - but as far as I'm concerned this is my selected answer :) – developer82 Sep 16 '14 at 5:02
  • This is exactly what I wanted. Thanks! Found via search for "powershell overwriting lines of output." – bgStack15 Nov 8 '19 at 18:53
  • 1
    Write-Host works because of the `r but why the cls at all? It is very much not nice for a program/script to clear your shell to display progress, when it can simply append it on the next line. Which is what would happen without cls. Hence it is probably best to listen to the second part and just use Write-Progress, if you can tolerate how invasive on the screen it is – dtasev Dec 3 '19 at 15:21
17

As a tweak to Raf's answer above, You don't have to wipe the screen every time to update your last line. Calling Write-Host with -NoNewLine and carriage return `r is enough.

for ($a=0; $a -le 100; $a++) {
  Write-Host -NoNewLine "`r$a% complete"
  Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 10
}
Write-Host #ends the line after loop
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  • 6
    Yes ISE console behaviour is different than expected, but it works on the powershell console. – Dullson Aug 14 '15 at 10:36
12

It not perfect but here is a script which has a spinning character in place. The part that lets you do this is:

$origpos = $host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition
$origpos.Y += 1

Get the current position and save it so that we can keep referring to it. As you progress you change the $host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition. Since it was previously saved you can reset it back $host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition = $origpos. You should be able to experiment with that.

$scroll = "/-\|/-\|"
$idx = 0
$job = Invoke-Command -ComputerName $env:ComputerName -ScriptBlock { Start-Sleep -Seconds 10 } -AsJob

$origpos = $host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition
$origpos.Y += 1

while (($job.State -eq "Running") -and ($job.State -ne "NotStarted"))
{
    $host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition = $origpos
    Write-Host $scroll[$idx] -NoNewline
    $idx++
    if ($idx -ge $scroll.Length)
    {
        $idx = 0
    }
    Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 100
}
# It's over - clear the activity indicator.
$host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition = $origpos
Write-Host 'Complete'

Remove-Variable('job')


$job = Start-Job -ScriptBlock { Start-Sleep -Seconds 10 }
while (($job.State -eq "Running") -and ($job.State -ne "NotStarted"))
{
    Write-Host '.' -NoNewline
    Start-Sleep -Seconds 1
}
Write-Host ""

So as log as you remember where you want to go back to then you can use this logic. This will not work properly in ISE. You can also use `b as a back space character as well.

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7

You can use the .NET console class to do exactly what you want where you want it. Works in console windows only and not the ISE.

cls
[Console]::SetCursorPosition(40,5)
[Console]::Write('Value of $i = ')
[Console]::SetCursorPosition(40,7)
[Console]::Write('Value of $j = ')
For ($i = 1; $i -lt 11; $i++)
{
    [Console]::SetCursorPosition(57,5)
    [Console]::Write($i)
    for ($j = 1; $j -lt 11; $j++)
    {
        [Console]::SetCursorPosition(57,7)
        [Console]::Write("$j ")  
        Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 200 
    }
    Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 200
}

[Console]::SetCursorPosition(40,5)
[Console]::Write("                    `n")
[Console]::SetCursorPosition(40,7)
[Console]::Write("                    `n")

[Console]::SetCursorPosition(0,0)
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6

If the goal is strictly to overwrite powershell console prompt line (the current line with the cursor) then all the answers here work only to an extent, and in some ways doing more than is desired.

Raf's and Craig's answers that use the Clear-Host cmdlet (cls) in their first line, like Dullson noted, are doing too much. Blanking the entire screen assumes the things cleared are no longer important for viewing which may not be true. Sometimes these are necessary to make sense of the current line.

Raf's Write-Progress solution is a powerful cmdlet but seems like an overkill for just overwriting the current line.

Raf's Write-Host proposal, Matt's submission and Dullson's tweak are all good where only one character position at a definite screen position needs updating or where the succeeding line text is longer in length than the current. If not, the succeeding line text would only overwrite the current line to the extent of its length leaving those parts of the succeeded line whose length position is longer than the new to remain in view together with the new line.

For example, if the previous value was 10 and the new value is 9 what would be shown is 90. The 9 just overwrites the portion of the preceding value that is equal to its length - 1. So the solutions work well for increments but not so well for decrements where length of value reduces compared to previous.

The following block shows how to guarantee total (visual) overwrite of the current line text with a new one.

$LongString = "This string is long"
$ShortString = "This is short"

#Simulate typing a string on the console line
$L = 1
While ($L -le $LongString.Length)
{
    $Sub = $LongString.Substring(0,$L)
    Write-Host "`r$Sub" -NoNewline
    $L++
    # This sleep is just to simulate manual typing delay
    Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 20
}

# Now blank out the entire line with the space character " "
# The quantity of spaces should be equal to the length of the current text
# Which in this case is contained in $Sub.Length

$Blank = " "
For($L = 1; $L -le $Sub.Length; $L++)
    {            
        $Blank = $Blank + " "
    }
Write-Host "`r$Blank" -NoNewline

# Overwrite the blank console line with the new string    
$L = 1
While ($L -le $ShortString.Length)
{
    $Sub = $ShortString.Substring(0,$L)
    Write-Host "`r$Sub" -NoNewline
    $L++
    # This sleep is just to simulate delay in manual typing
    Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 20
}

# The following is not required if you want the Powershell prompt
# to resume to the next line and not overwrite current console line.
# It is only required if you want the Powershell prompt to return
# to the current console line.
# You therefore blank out the entire line with spaces again.
# Otherwise prompt text might be written into just the left part of the last
# console line text instead of over its entirety.

For($L = 1; $L -le $Sub.Length; $L++)
    {            
        $Blank = $Blank + " "
    }
Write-Host "`r$Blank" -NoNewline
Write-Host "`r" -NoNewline
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  • Only seeing this now. My solution is based on saving previous position. You can use the same logic to edit multiple characters in different positions as long as you move around. using the backspace character will also allow you to remove as much as you want. It's not dependent on a single character. It is just presented that way. – Matt Sep 15 '16 at 13:43
  • If I don't know the length of the line currently displayed, and want to overwrite it with spaces before writing on it - is there a way to find out the length of a line currently displayed in the console? Or to read the character at the current cursor position? – Ran Lottem Aug 2 '17 at 20:47
3

I know, thats quite old, but i was in the same Situation und modified the Solution from Boluwade Kujero, just because writing blank lines before writing the new output may result in a "flickering" output.

So in the following function, I just do overwrite the existing line, write blanks until reaching the old cursorposition, and go back to the last character of the new line.

In addition i added an optical progressbar. Progress is calculated by the function through given Parameters:

function Write-Status 
{
  param([int]$Current,
        [int]$Total,
        [string]$Statustext,
        [string]$CurStatusText,
        [int]$ProgressbarLength = 35)

  # Save current Cursorposition for later
  [int]$XOrg = $host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition.X

  # Create Progressbar
  [string]$progressbar = ""
  for ($i = 0 ; $i -lt $([System.Math]::Round($(([System.Math]::Round(($($Current) / $Total) * 100, 2) * $ProgressbarLength) / 100), 0)); $i++) {
    $progressbar = $progressbar + $([char]9608)
  }
  for ($i = 0 ; $i -lt ($ProgressbarLength - $([System.Math]::Round($(([System.Math]::Round(($($Current) / $Total) * 100, 2) * $ProgressbarLength) / 100), 0))); $i++) {
    $progressbar = $progressbar + $([char]9617)
  }
  # Overwrite Current Line with the current Status
  Write-Host -NoNewline "`r$Statustext $progressbar [$($Current.ToString("#,###").PadLeft($Total.ToString("#,###").Length)) / $($Total.ToString("#,###"))] ($($( ($Current / $Total) * 100).ToString("##0.00").PadLeft(6)) %) $CurStatusText"

  # There might be old Text behing the current Currsor, so let's write some blanks to the Position of $XOrg
  [int]$XNow = $host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition.X
  for ([int]$i = $XNow; $i -lt $XOrg; $i++) {
    Write-Host -NoNewline " "
  }
  # Just for optical reasons: Go back to the last Position of current Line
  for ([int]$i = $XNow; $i -lt $XOrg; $i++) {
    Write-Host -NoNewline "`b"
  }
}

Use the function like this:

For ([int]$i=0; $i -le 8192; $i++) {
    Write-Status -Current $i -Total 8192 -Statustext "Running a long Task" -CurStatusText "Working on Position $i"
}

The result will be a running progressbar that will look like this (in a single line):

Running a long Task ██████████████████░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ [4.242 / 8.192] ( 51,78 %) Working on Position 4242

Hope this will help someone else

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  • 5
    Isn't this just a complicated version of Write-Progress? – Matt Nov 16 '16 at 19:53
2

This one I got from a blog post by Thomas Rayner. He uses ANSI Escape Sequences to save the cursor position [s and update the cursor position [u

$E=[char]27

Then save the current cursor position using the save escape sequence:

"${E}[s"

Usage: Use the update sequence ${E}[u to tell PS where to start the string:

1..10 | %{"${E}[uThere are $_ s remaining"; Start-Sleep -Seconds 1}

Does not work in the ISE however.

I know links get stale but it is here today.

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  • 1
    great to see 'old' DOS ANSI.sys ESC/sequences get back to live again... – ZEE Apr 24 '19 at 14:40
  • 1
    Nice (note that the link now results in an invalid-certificate warning). As an aside, now that PowerShell is cross-platform: On Unix-like platforms, this doesn't work as expected from PowerShell scripts, unfortunately (except in the macOS default terminal, it works interactively, though, strangely). – mklement0 Mar 24 at 15:32
1

https://241931348f64b1d1.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/how-to-write-on-the-same-line-with-write-output/

This method worked for me to write output value in a loop until its status changed to "Succeeded". Ensure you set the cursor up by required number of lines and it overwrites the same line

while($val -ne 1)
    {
    if($taskstates.Tasks.state[0] -eq "Succeeded" -and $taskstates.Tasks.state[1] -eq "Succeeded" -and $taskstates.Tasks.state[2] -eq "Succeeded" -and $taskstates.Tasks.state[3] -eq "Succeeded")
        {
            $val = 1
        }
    #Clear-Host
    $taskstates.Tasks.StartTime[0].ToString() +" "+ $taskstates.Tasks.name[0] +" is "+ $taskstates.Tasks.state[0]
    $taskstates.Tasks.StartTime[1].ToString() +" "+ $taskstates.Tasks.name[1] +" is "+ $taskstates.Tasks.state[1]
    $taskstates.Tasks.StartTime[2].ToString() +" "+ $taskstates.Tasks.name[2] +" is "+ $taskstates.Tasks.state[2]
    $taskstates.Tasks.StartTime[3].ToString() +" "+ $taskstates.Tasks.name[3] +" is "+ $taskstates.Tasks.state[3]
    $taskstates = Get-ASRJob -Name $failoverjob.Name
    "ASR VMs build is in Progress"
    Start-Sleep 5
    [console]::setcursorposition($([console]::Cursorleft ),$([console]::CursorTop - 4))
    }
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  • Ok... using [console]::setcursorposition--- works! – ZEE Apr 24 '19 at 14:36
1

I'm late to the party. Here's a proof of concept I recently discovered and adapted for my purposes. This example overwrites the line.

$count = 1

# Used for calculating the max number length for padding trailing spaces
$totalCount = 100

#Get current cursor position
$curCursorPos = New-Object System.Management.Automation.Host.Coordinates
$curCursorPos.X = $host.ui.rawui.CursorPosition.X
$curCursorPos.Y = $host.ui.rawui.CursorPosition.Y

# Counter code
While ($count -le 100) {


    # Keep cursor in the same position on the same line
    $host.ui.rawui.CursorPosition = $curCursorPos

    # Display with padded trailing spaces to overwrite any extra digits
    $pad = ($totalCount -as [string]).Length

    # Display the counter
    Write-Host "$(([string]$count).Padright($pad))" -NoNewline -ForegroundColor Green

    # Run through the example quickly
    Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 100

    #increment $count
    $count++

}

You can experiment with Write-Host -NoNewline property, by keeping it or removing it, to see which looks better for you.

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1

Try

for ($i=1;$i -le 100;$i++){Write-Host -NoNewline "`r" $i;sleep 1}
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  • 4
    Try to add some explanation about your solution :) – Lucas Meine Oct 2 '19 at 13:29
  • "`r" is powershell for usually \r - carriage return. This simply returns the cursor to the beginning of the line, so the text is overwritten. I think everything else is clear – dtasev Dec 3 '19 at 15:19
0

You can use $Host.UI.RawUI.WindowSize.Width to find the display width and then use .PadRight to fill up the line with spaces. This avoids having to clear the screen with each loop, the issue of characters persisted from the last loop, having to manipulate cursor position, or having to write a custom function or lots of cumbersome code, e.g.:

# only works in a console window
If ($Host.Name -eq "ConsoleHost")
{
    Write-Host 'Starting...'

    # find the max line length of the console host
    $maxLineLength = $Host.UI.RawUI.WindowSize.Width

    # loop a few times
    For ($i = 1; $i -le 10; $i++)
    {
        # for the sake of demonstration, generate a random-length string of letters
        $randStringLength = Get-Random -Minimum 1 -Maximum $maxLineLength
        $randCharIndex = Get-Random -Minimum 65 -Maximum (65+26) # A = ASCII 65
        $randChar = ([char]$randCharIndex)
        $myString = [string]$randChar*$randStringLength

        # overwrite at the current console line
        Write-Host ("`r"+$myString.PadRight($maxLineLength," ")) -NoNewline

        # pause briefly before going again
        Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 200
    }

    Write-Host 'Done.'
}
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