15

the following code will check to see if you have any duplicate characters in the string, but i don't understand the if clause:

public static boolean isUniqueChars(String str) {
        int checker = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); ++i) {
            int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';
            if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) 
                return false;
            checker |= (1 << val);
        }
        return true;
    }

I tried to look up some references, I am new to bit shifting, all i understand is that << shifts the binary number left or right. Can you explain to me how checker |= (1 << val) works ? and that 'if' statement as well.

3
  • 1
    it is the same code as public static boolean isUniqueChars(String str) { boolean checker[] = new boolean[str.length())];for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); ++i) {int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a'; if (checker[val]) return false;checker[val] = true;}return true;} but instead of boolean array the flag is stored as bit in int variable
    – Selvin
    Sep 15 '14 at 11:46
  • Since this algorithm has used a boolean array, this has O(n) space complexity. Apr 19 '17 at 7:08
  • This space usage has been reduced by using this bit vector. Apr 19 '17 at 7:10

10 Answers 10

28

I was also going through this book Cracking the Code Interview and ended up googling for a clear explanations. Finally I understood the concept.

Here is the approach.

Note :

  1. We will assume, in the below code, that the string is only lower case ‘a’ through ‘z’. This will allow us to use just a single int.

  2. Java integer is of size 32

  3. Number of lower case alphabets is 26

So we can clearly set 0/1 (true or false) value inside one integer in decimal notation.

  1. It is similar to bool visited[32] . bool uses 1 byte. Hence you need 32 bytes for storing bool visited[32].

  2. Bit masking is a space optimization to this.

Lets start :

  1. You are looping through all the characters in the string.
  2. Suppose on i'th iteration you found character 'b' . You calculate its 0 based index.

int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';

For 'b' it is 1. ie 98-97 .

  1. Now using left shift operator, we find the value of 2^1 => 2.

(1 << val) // 1<<1 => 10(binary)

Now let us see how bitwise & works

0 & 0 -> 0
0 & 1 -> 0
1 & 0 -> 0
1 & 1 -> 1

So by the below code :

(checker & (1 << val))

We check if the checker[val] == 0 . Suppose we had already encountered 'b'.

check = 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1000 1000 0010   &  
'b'   = 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0010 
 ----------------------------------------------
result= 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0010

ie decimal value = 2 which is >0

So you finally we understood this part.

 if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) 
                return false;
  1. Now if 'b' was not encountered, then we set the second bit of checker using bitwise OR.

( This part is called as bit masking. )

OR's Truth table

0 | 0 -> 0
0 | 1 -> 1
1 | 0 -> 1
1 | 1 -> 1

So

check = 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1000 1000 0000   |  
'b'   = 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0010 
 ----------------------------------------------
result= 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1000 1000 0010

So that simplifies this part:

checker |= (1 << val);  // checker = checker |  (1 << val);

I hope this helped someone !

2
  • 1
    simply genius ;) +1 Dec 20 '18 at 14:56
  • 1
    Helpful! Thank You
    – Subhan Ali
    Nov 15 '19 at 20:55
9

Seems like I am late to the party, but let me take a stab at the explanation.

First of all the AND i.e & operation:

0 & 0 = 0
1 & 0 = 0
0 & 1 = 0
1 & 1 = 1

So basically, if you are given a bit, and you want to find out if its 1 or 0, you just & it with a 1. If the result is 1 then you had a 1, else you had 0. We will use this property of the & below.

The OR i.e | operation

0 | 0 = 0
1 | 0 = 1
0 | 1 = 1
1 | 1 = 1  

So basically, if you are given a bit, and you want to do something to it so that the output is always 1, then you do an | 1 with it.

Now, In Java the type int is 4 bytes i.e. 32 bits. Thus we can use an int itself as a data-structure to store 32 states or booleans in simpler terms, since a bit can either be 0 or 1 i.e false or true. Since we assume that our string is composed of only lower case characters, we have enough space inside our int to store a boolean for each of the 26 chars!

So first we initialize our data-structure that we call checker to 0 which is nothing but 32 zeros: 0000000000000000000000.

So far so good?

Now we go through our string, for each character, first we get an integer representation of the character.

int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';

We subtract a from it because we want our integer to be 0 based. So if vals:

a = 0 i.e. `0000000000000000000000`
b = 1 i.e. `0000000000000000000001`
c = 2 i.e. `0000000000000000000010`
d = 4 i.e. `0000000000000000000100`

Now as seen above, a is 32 zeros, but rest of the characters have a single 1 and 31 zeros. So when we use these characters, we left shift each of them by 1, i.e. (1 << val), so each of them have a single 1 bit, and 31 zero bits:

a = 1 i.e. `0000000000000000000001`
b = 2 i.e. `0000000000000000000010`
c = 4 i.e. `0000000000000000000100`
d = 8 i.e. `0000000000000000001000`

We are done with the setup. Now we do 2 things:

  1. First assume all characters are different. For every char we encounter, we want our datastructure i.e. checker to have 1 for that char. So we use our OR property descrived above to generate a 1 in our datastructure, and hence we do:

    checker = checker | (1 << val);
    

Thus checker stores 1 for every character we encounter.

  1. Now we come to the part where characters can repeate. So before we do step 1, we want to make sure that the checker already does not have a 1 at the position corresponding to the current character. So we check the value of

    checker & (1 << val)
    

So with help of the AND property described above, if we get a 1 from this operation, then checker already had a 1 at that position, which means we must have encountered this character before. So we immediately return false.

That's it. If all our & checks return 0, we finally return true, meaning there were no character repititions.

1
  • Very Descriptive! Thank You.
    – Subhan Ali
    Nov 15 '19 at 20:54
2

1 << val is the same as 2 to the degree of val. So it's a number which has
just one one in its binary representation (the one is at position val+1, if you count from
the right side of the number to the left one).

a |= b means basically this: set in a all binary flags/ones from the
binary representation of b (and keep those in a which were already set).

1

This sets the 'val'th bit from the right to 1.

1 << val is a 1 shifted left val times. The rest of the value is 0.

The line is equivalent to checker = checker | (1 << val). Or-ing with a 0 bit does nothing, since x | 0 == x. But or-ing with 1 always results in 1. So this turns (only) that bit on.

The if statement is similar, in that it is checking to see if the bit is already on. The mask value 1 << val is all 0s except for a single 1. And-ing with 0 always produces 0, so most bits in the result are 0. x & 1 == x, so this will be non-zero only if that bit at val is not 0.

1

checker |= (1 << val) is the same as checker = checker | (1 << val). << is left bit shift as you said. 1 << val means it's a 1 shifted val digits left. Example: 1 << 4 is 1000. A left bit shift is the same as multiply by 2. 4 left bit shifts are 4 times 1 multiplied by 2.

1 * 2 = 2 (1)
2 * 2 = 4 (2)
4 * 2 = 8 (3)
8 * 2 = 16 = (4)

| operator is bitwise or. It's like normal or for one bit. If we have more than one bit you do the or operation for every bit. Example:

110 | 011 = 111

You can use that for setting flags (make a bit 1).

The if condition is similar to that, but has the & operator, which is bitwise and. It is mainly used to mask a binary number.

Example:

110 | 100 = 100

So your code just checks if the bit at place val is 1, then return false, otherwise set the bit at place val to 1.

1

The other answers explain the coding operator usages but i don't think they touch the logic behind this code.

Basically the code 1 << val is shifting 1 in a binary number to a unique place for each character for example

a-0001 b-0010 c-0100 d-1000

As you can notice for different characters the place of 1 is different

checker = checker | (1 << val)

checker here is Oring (basically storing 1 at the same place as it was in 1<<val) So checker knows what characters have already ocurred Let's say after the occurence of a,b,c,d checker would look like this 0000 1111

finally

if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) 

checks if that character has already been occured before if yes return false.To explain you should know a little about AND(&) operation.

  • 1&1->1
  • 0&0->0
  • 1&0->0

So checker currently have 1 in places whose corresponding characters have already occured the only way the expression inside if statement is true if a character occurs twice which leads 1&1->1 > 0

0

It means do a binary OR on the values checker and (1 << val) (which is 1, left shifted val times) and save the newly created value in checker.

Left Shift (<<)

Shift all the binary digits left one space. Effectively raise the number to 2 to the power of val or multiply the number by 2 val times.

Bitwise OR (|)

In each binary character of both left and right values, if there is a 1 in the place of either of the two numbers then keep it.

Augmented Assignment (|=)

Do the operation (in this case bitwise OR) and assign the value to the left hand variable. This works with many operators such as:-

  • a += b, add a to b and save the new value in a.
  • a *= b, multiply a by b and save the new value in a.
0

Bitwise shift works as follows:

Example: a=15 (bit representation : 0000 1111)

For operation: a<<2

It will rotate bit representation by 2 positions in left direction.

So a<<2 is 0011 1100 = 0*2^7+0*2^6+1*2^5+1*2^4+1*2^3+1*2^2+0*2^1+0*2^0 = 1*2^5+1*2^4+1*2^3+1*2^2 = 32+18+8+4=60

hence a<<2 = 60

Now:

checker & (1<<val), will always be greater then 0, if 1 is already present at 1<<val position.

Hence we can return false.

Else we will assign checker value of 1 at 1

0

I've been working on the algorithm and here's what I noticed that would also work. It makes the algorithm easier to understand when you exercise it by hand:

public static boolean isUniqueChars(String str) {
    if (str.length() > 26) { // Only 26 characters
        return false;
    }
    int checker = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
        int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';
        int newValue = Math.pow(2, val) // int newValue = 1 << val
        if ((checker & newValue) > 0) return false;
        checker += newValue // checker |= newValue
    }
    return true;

When we get the value of val (0-25), we could either shift 1 to the right by the value of val, or we could use the power of 2s.

Also, for as long as the ((checker & newValue) > 0) is false, the new checker value is generated when we sum up the old checker value and the newValue.

0
public static boolean isUniqueChars(String str) {
    int checker = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); ++i) {
        int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';
        if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) 
            return false;
        checker |= (1 << val);
    }
    return true;
}

1 << val uses right shift operator. Let us say we have character z. ASCII code of z is 122. a-z is 97- 122 = 25. If we multiply 1*(2)^25 = 33554432. Binary of that is 10000000000000000000000000 if checker has 1 on its 26th bit then this statement if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) would be true and isUniqueChar would return false. otherwise checker would turn it's 26th bit on. |= operator(bitwise or and assignment operator) does checker bitwise OR 10000000000000000000000000. Assigns the result to checker.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.