2

I am working with IoC and more precisely with windsor and I have an amletic doubt about one thing. Right now I am implementing the DDD Command layer so for each command I have a concrete class as following

public class CreateUserCommand : IDomainCommand{
   /// implementation
}

Each command has 1 or more handlers with the following implementation

public class CreateUserHandler : IDomainCommandHandler<CreateUserCommand>
{
   public void Handle(CreateUserCommand command)
   {
      /// implementation
   }
}

The problem arise with my Command Dispatcher. I am using the following form at the moment

public class CommandDispatcher : ICommandDispatcher
{
   private IWindsorContainer container;

   public CommandDispatcher(IWindsorContainer container)
   {
      this.container = container;
   }

   public void Dispatch<T>(T command)
   {
      var commandHandler = container.Resolve<ICommandHandler<T>>();
    commandHandler.Handle(command);

   }
}

What I don't like is the awareness of the dispatcher about the IoC container but in the same way I don't know how I can sort of resolve the handlers only when I need them. Shell I inject an handler factory inside the Dispatcher and use it to resolve my handlers at runtime?

  • 2
    There is another way to do it properly. You must use TypedFactory Facility. There must be no reference to DI container in your app anywhere and all the tools and patterns you need to do it are described in the documentation. – Ognyan Dimitrov Sep 15 '14 at 18:59
7

I'd use the typed factory facility to create a factory to replace the container usage. Conceptually the idea is the same, but it removes the dependency on the container.

The factory (no implementation, the facility takes care of that):

public interface ICommandHandlerFactory
{
    ICommandHandler<T> Create<T>();
}

Registration:

// requires Castle.Facilities.TypedFactory namespace
windsorContainer.AddFacility<TypedFactoryFacility>();

// AsFactory() is an extension method in the same namespace
windsorContainer.Register(Component.For<ICommandHandlerFactory>().AsFactory());

Then in your class:

public class CommandDispatcher : ICommandDispatcher
{
    private ICommandHandlerFactory commandHandlerFactory;

    public CommandDispatcher(ICommandHandlerFactory commandHandlerFactory)
    {
        this.commandHandlerFactory = commandHandlerFactory;
    }

    public void Dispatch<T>(T command)
    {
        var commandHandler = commandHandlerFactory.Create<T>();
        commandHandler.Handle(command);
    }
}
  • This is exactly what I was looking for but I didnt't know you can create a facility factory using total generics properties Thank you – Raffaeu Sep 16 '14 at 8:45
2

It's okay for infrastructure code that is part of your composition root to take a dependency on the container. This is not an implementation of the Service Locator anti-pattern, since the Service Locator is about role and not mechanics.

In other words, as long as your CommandDispatcher is part of the composition root (and contains just infrastructure, no business logic) it is okay to let it depend on the container.

  • Thank you for the answer Steven, this was my primary concern, not to jump into the anti-pattern of the Service Locator. – Raffaeu Sep 16 '14 at 8:45

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