12

When to use

Container c = getContentpane();

& when to use.

frame.getcontentpane();
3
  • 2
    Huh? Can you give an example of each? What did the API tell you? Sep 15, 2014 at 15:45
  • my textbook program uses only frame.getcontentpane .. but while actually implementing it it doesnt work. I have to use con = getcontentpane().. would u tell me mechanism of getcontentpane.. it may clear my all doubts. Sep 15, 2014 at 15:54
  • Can you post some of your code? Does the class you are calling getContentPane() from in the first example extend JFrame?
    – mdewitt
    Sep 15, 2014 at 16:06

5 Answers 5

16
getContentPane().setBackground(Color.YELLOW);

This line of code is difficult to understand, and the tutor will lay the foundation for you to understand it fully as you continue to study Java. First to consider is the rule about modifying an object with a method. On the left side of a period is an object, and the method that modifies the object is on the right side of the period. That rule applies here.

A container has several layers in it. You can think of a layer as a transparent film that overlays the container. In Java Swing, the layer that is used to hold objects is called the content pane. Objects are added to the content pane layer of the container. The getContentPane() method retrieves the content pane layer so that you can add an object to it. The content pane is an object created by the Java run time environment. You do not have to know the name of the content pane to use it. When you use getContentPane(), the content pane object then is substituted there so that you can apply a method to it. In this line of code, we are not adding an object to the content pane. Rather, we are making the color of the content pane to be yellow. This line of code is what changes the default color, white, to yellow, and you may recall seeing the yellow rectangle in the example the program running in a browser. This line of code is what made that rectangular area yellow.

One way to think about this is to think that the content pane object is substituted for the getContentPane() method, like this:

contentpaneobject.setBackground(Color.YELLOW);

Although you never really see the above statement, you do have the functionality of the statement. When you retrieve the content pane with the getContentPane() method, you can then modify the content pane object, which is arbitrarily named contentpaneobject in the example above. In this statement, the modification is to change the color of the content pane. That step is presented next in the tutor.

Notice the form of getContentPane() as a method. The method begins with a lower case letter, and it has parentheses. The parentheses are empty.

enter image description here

enter image description here

12

If the code is part of a JFrame subclass, you should use getContentPane(). If the code is not part of the frame (perhaps you're in the static main() method for the application), then you need to use a JFrame object to call getContentPane(); that's what frame.getContentPane() does.

Examples:

public class TestApp extends JFrame {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        TestApp frame = new TestApp();
        Container c = frame.getContentPane();
        // do something with c
        frame.pack();
        frame.show();
    }

    /* constructor */
    public TestApp() {
        Container c = getContentPane(); // same as this.getContentPane()
        // initialize contents of frame
    }
}
5
  • this frame i am talking about is not var of user class.. its of JFrame class Sep 15, 2014 at 16:14
  • @ChinmayKale - Yeah, I should have realized that. getContentPane() is a Swing method. I think you got the basic idea, though.
    – Ted Hopp
    Sep 15, 2014 at 16:19
  • So we can make same gui's with Only Container class or Only Jframe class? it doesnt matter? Sep 15, 2014 at 16:30
  • 4
    @ChinmayKale - It matters. A JFrame is a particular type of Container that is intended to be shown as a top-level container for an app. A generic Container is pretty much any kind of visual component of a Java program that can hold other visual components. A JFrame itself contains a special Container called the content pane in which most of its contained components are placed. (A JFrame also has a menu bar; other Swing container types may also have their own specialized components.) When you add components to a JFrame, they actually get added to its content pane.
    – Ted Hopp
    Sep 15, 2014 at 16:46
  • Thanks for the help Oct 31, 2019 at 20:33
2

Well, I could direct to the api :

Returns the contentPane object for this frame.

It's all part of the gui initialization process. Java's protocol really, admittedly some boilerplate to get your GUI up:

public class FlowLayoutExample extends JApplet {

  public void init () {
    getContentPane().setLayout(new FlowLayout ());
    getContentPane().add(new JButton("One"));
    getContentPane().add(new JButton("Two"));
    getContentPane().add(new JButton("Three"));
    getContentPane().add(new JButton("Four"));
    getContentPane().add(new JButton("Five"));
    getContentPane().add(new JButton("Six"));
  }
}

-Source

But essentially, we're obtaining the content pane layer so that you can later add an object to it. See this for more details.

1

Likely you are extending JFrame which means that the class will inherit the methods from JFrame. As such, your code may look somewhat like the following:

public class MyClass extends JFrame {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                try {
                    new MyClass();
                } catch (Exception e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        });
    }

    public MyClass() {
        ...
        Container c = getContentPane();
    }
}

In the above example, there is no need to use frame.getContentPane() because you are inheriting the methods of JFrame. In other words, you only need to write getContentPane(). Alternatively, in most cases you should actually be instantiating a new JFrame as an instance variable unless you are actually adding new functionality to the JFrame class:

public class MyClass {
    private JFrame frame;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                try {
                    new MyClass();
                } catch (Exception e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        });
    }

    public MyClass() {
        ...
        Container c = frame.getContentPane();
    }
}
0

If you we extend JFrame then we can use getContentPane() method direct in our BoxLayout object . But if we apply association rule (means we create an Object of JFrame in our code i.e. JFrame f=new JFrame()), then we need to create a Container object and pass this object in BoxLayout() as an argument.

  1. When we extends JFrame:

    public class BoxLayOutTest extends JFrame {
        public BoxLayOutTest() {
            // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
            setSize(300, 400);
            setVisible(true);
            getContentPane().setLayout(new  BoxLayout(getContentPane(), BoxLayout.X_AXIS));
            JButton b1 = new JButton("One");
            JButton b2 = new JButton("Two");
            JButton b3 = new JButton("Three");
            JButton b4 = new JButton("Four");
            JButton b5 = new JButton("Five");
    
            add(b1);
            add(b2);
            add(b3);
            add(b4);
            add(b5);
        }
    
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            new BoxLayOutTest();
        }
    }
    
  2. If we create JFrame Object inside code:

    public class TwoPanelinFrame {
        JFrame f;
    
        public TwoPanelinFrame() {
            f = new JFrame("Panel Test");
            f.setSize(600, 600);
            f.setVisible(true);
            Container c = f.getContentPane();
            f.getContentPane().setLayout(new BoxLayout(c, BoxLayout.X_AXIS));
    
            JButton b2 = new JButton("One");
            JButton b3 = new JButton("One");
            JButton b4 = new JButton("One");
            JButton b5 = new JButton("One");
    
            f.add(b2);
            f.add(b3);
            f.add(b4);
            f.add(b4);
        }
    
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            new TwoPanelinFrame();
        }
    }
    

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