8

Suppose I have a printf-like function (used for logging) utilizing perfect forwarding:

template<typename... Arguments>
void awesome_printf(std::string const& fmt, Arguments&&... args)
{
    boost::format f(fmt);
    f % /* How to specify `args` here? */;
    BlackBoxLogFunction(boost::str(f).c_str());
}

(I didn't compile this but my real function follows this guideline)

How can I "unroll" the variadic argument into the boost::format variable f?

11

As is usual with variadic templates, you can use recursion:

std::string awesome_printf_helper(boost::format& f){
    return boost::str(f);
}

template<class T, class... Args>
std::string awesome_printf_helper(boost::format& f, T&& t, Args&&... args){
    return awesome_printf_helper(f % std::forward<T>(t), std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

template<typename... Arguments>
void awesome_printf(std::string const& fmt, Arguments&&... args)
{
    boost::format f(fmt);

    auto result = awesome_printf_helper(f, std::forward<Arguments>(args)...);

    // call BlackBoxLogFunction with result as appropriate, e.g.
    std::cout << result;
}

Demo.


In C++17, simply (f % ... % std::forward<Arguments>(args)); will do.

  • 3
    Forcing the newline at the end of the output is not a good idea for reusability: It's easily integrated into the format-string, and making it mandatory precludes extending the line before it ends. – Deduplicator Sep 16 '14 at 3:01
  • 1
    @Deduplicator Fixed. – T.C. Sep 16 '14 at 3:14
9

I did some googling and found an interesting solution:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/format.hpp>

template<typename... Arguments>
void format_vargs(std::string const& fmt, Arguments&&... args)
{
    boost::format f(fmt);
    int unroll[] {0, (f % std::forward<Arguments>(args), 0)...};
    static_cast<void>(unroll);

    std::cout << boost::str(f);
}

int main()
{
    format_vargs("%s %d %d", "Test", 1, 2);
}

I don't know if this is a recommended solution but it seems to work. I don't like the hacky static_cast usage, which seems necessary to silence the unused variable warnings on GCC.

  • 3
    You can avoid the cast by not creating a temp variable using unroll = int[]; unroll{0, (f % std::forward<Arguments>(args), 0)...}; – Praetorian Sep 16 '14 at 3:32
  • @Praetorian That works out nicely; however the using seems superfluous... I wonder why int[] { /* ... */ }; doesn't work... – void.pointer Sep 16 '14 at 3:38
  • Because the grammar doesn't allow it. It's either the using or the cast. – Praetorian Sep 16 '14 at 3:42
  • Note that this trick is dependent on f % x % y; being equivalent to f % x; f % y;. (Also, I'd cast f % std::forward<Arguments>(args) to void just in case the type has an overloaded comma operator.) – T.C. Sep 16 '14 at 4:55
  • You may also use std::initializer_list<int>{(f% forward<Args>(args), 0)...}; to avoid the cast (and the case without args)(but requires an include). – Jarod42 Sep 16 '14 at 7:17
9

Just to summarize the void.pointer's solution and the hints proposed by Praetorian, T.C. and Jarod42, let me provide the final version (online demo)

#include <boost/format.hpp>
#include <iostream>

template<typename... Arguments>
std::string FormatArgs(const std::string& fmt, const Arguments&... args)
{
    boost::format f(fmt);
    std::initializer_list<char> {(static_cast<void>(
        f % args
    ), char{}) ...};

    return boost::str(f);
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << FormatArgs("no args\n"); // "no args"
    std::cout << FormatArgs("%s; %s; %s;\n", 123, 4.3, "foo"); // 123; 4.3; foo;
    std::cout << FormatArgs("%2% %1% %2%\n", 1, 12); // 12 1 12
}

Also, as it was noted by T.C., using the fold expression syntax, available since C++17, the FormatArgs function can be rewritten in the more succinct way

template<typename... Arguments>
std::string FormatArgs(const std::string& fmt, const Arguments&... args)
{
    return boost::str((boost::format(fmt) % ... % args));
}
  • Wow, I love the fold expression... I didn't even know they added that. Awesome. Question for clarity: Is the inner parenthesis required in your fold expression solution? In other words, would this work: boost::str(boost::format(fmt) % ... % args); – void.pointer Sep 8 '17 at 21:34
  • I expanded your demo to include your fold expression solution: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/bfabe441fba08d62 I also tried removing those inner parenthesis but it doesn't compile. Would be educational to know why, though. The diagnostic doesn't help much. – void.pointer Sep 8 '17 at 21:40
  • @void.pointer, it seems that parenthesis around a fold expression is a mandatory part of it and can't be omitted. You can look at the grammar description of fold expression ("Explanation" section). When the fold expression expands, parenthesis around it are removed, so in case of boost::str((fold expr)), we need to have extra parenthesis to get boost::str(expanded fold expr) after the fold expression expands – PolarBear Sep 9 '17 at 13:16

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