47

Which method is faster or more responsive in javascript, if-else, the ternary operator or logical OR? Which is advisable to use, for what reasons?

  • 13
    This is beyond micro-optimazation. This is like nano-optimization. Would you really change your coding style to save 0.0000000000001ms?! – Josh Stodola Apr 6 '10 at 17:23
  • 7
    If the perf difference between these really matters to you, Javascript is probably not the right language to be using. – Michael Apr 6 '10 at 17:50
  • 4
    Why did I get so annoyed because of the answers to this question? idk... – quemeful Mar 11 '15 at 0:38
20

The speed difference will be negligible - use whichever you find to be more readable. In other words I highly doubt that a bottleneck in your code will be due to using the wrong conditional construct.

  • 10
    It's supposed to be negligible. But we need tests to make sure some browser like IE didn't screw it up. – Sarsaparilla Nov 24 '14 at 17:45
  • 7
    Speed is important when handling millions of data in JavaScript – Kira Jan 31 '17 at 12:48
  • 12
    While I agree with this, the question is asking which method is faster. Aka this answer doesn't really answer the question. - I was actually curious to know for a similar reason that @Kira brought up – SeanRamzan May 23 '17 at 18:26
  • 2
    html5 game devs would benefit from knowing as well, We use if statements alot, so it's quite safe to say every millisecond counts 😭 sadly. – Kitanga Nday Aug 16 '18 at 1:53
135

Seems like nobody did any actual profiling. Here's the code I used:

test = function() {
    for (var i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
        var a = i < 100 ? 1 : 2;

        /*
        if(i < 100) {
            var a = 1;
        }else{
            var a = 2;
        }
        */
    }
}

test();

Using the if/else block instead of the ternary operator yields a 1.5 - 2x performance increase in Google Chrome v21 under OS X Snow Leopard.

As one use case where this is very important, synthesizing real-time audio is becoming more and more common with JavaScript. This type of performance difference is a big deal when an algorithm is running 44100 times a second.

  • 12
    just found this site / test today: jsperf.com/ternary-vs-switch which confirms my findings. However, when I ran the tests in Safari using the ternary operator was slightly faster... wouldn't want to make things simple for us :) – charlie roberts Dec 11 '12 at 8:05
  • In 32Bit Firefox 27 on Windows 8.1 64Bit Ternary is fastest for me, Switch slowest, if-else halfway inbetween. – Foo Bar Mar 1 '14 at 18:35
  • 22
    Thank you. I hate when all these people say "over optimizing" when there legit reasons for almost any optimization question. – quemeful Mar 11 '15 at 0:34
  • Do you mean performance improvement (faster) or time increase (slower)? – dmvianna Apr 14 '15 at 3:36
  • 2
    faster. at least around three years ago... I would run the linked jsperf test yourself as such results are certainly subject to change. – charlie roberts Apr 15 '15 at 7:11
35

I didn't think @charlie robert's test was fair

Here's my jsperf

result:

  1. strict equal is the fastest
  2. strict ternary is 33% slower
  3. truthy falsy is 49% slower
  4. ternary truthy falsy is 55% slower
  5. if else and ternary are roughly the same.

normal equal and normal ternary slowest.

strict equals:

var a = true, b;

if (a === true) {
  b = true;
} else {
  b = false
}
if (a === false) {
  b = true;
} else {
  b = false;
}

ternary strict equals

var a = true, b;

b = (a === true) ? true : false;

b = (a === false) ? true : false;

simple equality

 var a = true, b;

    if (a == true) {
      b = true;
    } else {
      b = false;
    }

    if (a == false) {
      b = true;
    } else {
      b = false;
    }

simple ternary equality

 var a = true, b;
    b = (a == true) ? true : false;

    b = (a == false) ? true : false;

truthy / falsy

var a = true, b;
if (a) {
  b = true;
} else {
  b = false;
}

if (!a) {
  b = true;
} else {
  b = false;
}

ternary truthy / falsy

var a = true, b;
b = (a) ? true : false;
b = (!a) ? true : false;
3

to charlie roberts' answer above, I would add:

the following link gives some incisive answers; the result for switches in Firefox being the most striking: http://jsperf.com/if-else-vs-arrays-vs-switch-vs-ternary/39

Those who question why anyone would investigate optimization to this degree would do well to research WebGL!

1

Ternary operator is only syntactic sugar, not a performance booster.

1

I'm doing another syntax:

var a = true,
    b;

b = (a == false) 
    ? true // if a == false, b = true
    : false; // else: a == true so b = false

    /* Equivalent of
    if(a == true)
      var b = true;
    else
      var b = false;

Some people like my code and tell me it's simple to read.

-2

There is no difference in speed.

Some prefer the if/else for readability. Personally, I use the ternary operator whenever the logic is trivial enough to understand on one line.

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