177

Can someone explain this to me please and what I can do to sort out my permissions issue. It seems to be stopping me from getting the authenticity of host heroku and fixing my keys issues.

david@daniel-Inspiron-531:~$ ssh-add david/.ssh/id_rsa
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@         WARNING: UNPROTECTED PRIVATE KEY FILE!          @
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
Permissions 0775 for 'david/.ssh/id_rsa' are too open.
It is required that your private key files are NOT accessible by others.
This private key will be ignored.
david@daniel-Ins

5 Answers 5

234

I would recommend you to re create a set of keys using

ssh-keygen -t rsa -C '<email>'

for a more secure system. Else changing the permissions to something less open would do.

To change permissions, use

chmod  400 ~/.ssh/id_rsa
5
  • 9
    It works. I have 10 servers, i copied the id_rsa from server1 to all other 9 servers then i got this error. To resolve it i applied chmod 400 ~/.ssh/id_rsa and i can now do $ git clone.
    – user285594
    Feb 9, 2015 at 9:37
  • 1
    This worked for me :- sudo chmod 600 ~/.ssh/id_rsa -- sudo chmod 600 ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub
    – hB0
    Mar 11, 2017 at 10:04
  • 1
    either permission could be 400 or 600 Dec 18, 2017 at 15:47
  • For me only 400 worked, 600 led to a time out while trying to fetch from the github repository Apr 2, 2020 at 10:17
  • I tried the equivalent windows method in this link it worked: gist.github.com/jaskiratr/cfacb332bfdff2f63f535db7efb6df93
    – Vijai
    Feb 22, 2022 at 15:30
51

Simply reset permissions to your key files to defaults

sudo chmod 600 ~/.ssh/id_rsa
sudo chmod 600 ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub
3
  • The command for the private key is correct. By other hand, public keys must have read permissions for all. If you limit the permissions to just the user/owner you could have some problems in the future. This command would do the trick sudo chmod a=r ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub or sudo chmod 644 ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub.
    – Dan
    Dec 31, 2021 at 6:24
  • 1
    This saved me a lot of time!
    – user736893
    Jan 26, 2023 at 1:49
  • @THEJOATMON that's great to hear!
    – JSEvgeny
    Jan 27, 2023 at 8:07
22

If you are using WSL, you can copy file.pem to ~/.ssh/

Copy file .pem

cp file.pem ~/.ssh/

Change permissions:

chmod 600 ~/.ssh/file.pem

Done, try again with your ssh-add

eval `ssh-agent -s`
ssh-add ~/.ssh/file.pem
1
  • Thanks Antonio, had to look up this answer twice in 2 weeks, lol!
    – Hank
    Jul 4, 2022 at 21:23
16

Just change the permission of the /.ssh/id_rsa file to 600

#chmod  600 ~/.ssh/id_rsa
4

You should change the owner of the file(which contains the private key)to your username with full access. and then remove the other usernames that have access to that file.

Right Click on the file which contains the private key and clicks on properties and then Security tab> Advanced by clicking on the change button you can change the owner to your username. (if you don't know the name of your username run: "echo %USERNAME%" in command prompt.) Change>Advanced...>Find Now

Remove all Permission entries except the one you just added

click on Disable inheritance> Convert inherited permissions..... then remove all Permission entries except the one you just added.

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