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I have two cloned repositories of two very similar open-source projects, which I have been working on in different instances in Sublime Text 2 to arrive at my desired result. Code from both of these projects was used. I have been using Git as version control for my project, but have not included the original projects. Thus, I would like to be able to quickly compare the contents of two files of the original project and compare the differences between them and my project.

I was hoping that Sublime Text 2 would have a "Compare File" feature, but I can't seem to find anything related to it in the settings or online. A third-party ST2 package to accomplish this task would also work well. Is such a task possible to do within the ST2 text editor?

10 Answers 10

638

You can actually compare files natively right in Sublime Text.

  1. Navigate to the folder containing them through Open Folder... or in a project
  2. Select the two files (ie, by holding Ctrl on Windows or on macOS) you want to compare in the sidebar
  3. Right click and select the Diff files... option.

  • 18
    @Derek: using select able to select but not able to find the diff file option on right click, only got the close option on right click. – Mohamed Hussain Oct 1 '15 at 7:54
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    @MohamedHussain There are really two different sidebars and you need to be in the right one for this to work. If you go to File>Open Folder..., Select the folder your files are in, then select View>Side Bar>Show Side Bar, you will get the one you need. You get the other by selecting View>Side Bar>Show Open Files, but this one will not let you use the Diff Files... option. – Jeramy Nov 3 '15 at 21:20
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    You can only diff files in the same folder? Eugh..... come on! – jmc Jan 12 '16 at 14:30
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    This unfortunately does not seem to work anymore in sublime build 3103 on mac. As soon as I right click the second file gets deselected, – merlin Apr 13 '16 at 8:24
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    Not working for me in Build 3144 on OSX. I can select two files in the file interface, but when I Ctrl-click only one becomes selected and the diff option isn't there. – James J Aug 18 '16 at 10:06
192

Compare Side-By-Side looks like the most convenient to me though it's not the most popular:

UPD: I need to add that this plugin can freeze ST while comparing big files. It is certainly not the best decision if you are going to compare large texts.

  • 8
    this is the easiest and most convenient solution IMO. Works well in ST3 – mihai Dec 17 '15 at 20:15
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    beautiful and OS – Seamus Abshere Feb 17 '16 at 17:58
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    Works well and can compare files from different locations which I haven't managed to do with the native compare. – Leo Mar 24 '16 at 15:01
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    This also works with copy pasted content in new unsaved tabs, which is handy in a pinch. – mtone Nov 14 '16 at 20:32
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    This is excellent a much better way of doing things :) – Eoin Jan 18 '17 at 16:59
56

There are a number of diff plugins available via Package Control. I've used Sublimerge Pro, which worked well enough, but it's a commercial product (with an unlimited trial period) and closed-source, so you can't tweak it if you want to change something, or just look at its internals. FileDiffs is quite popular, judging by the number of installs, so you might want to try that one out.

  • 1
    I am now using FileDiffs and it works like a charm. Thanks, answer accepted. – LanceLafontaine Sep 24 '14 at 23:34
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    Well I cannot figure it out how to use FileDiffs. Can you shortly describe how I can compare two files with it. – Jamil Ahmed Mar 17 '15 at 9:23
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    @LanceLafontaine I wouldn't normally do this, but would you mind changing the accepted answer to Derek 朕會功夫's answer below? Neither of us really need the points, but I didn't know there was a built-in diff at the time. I now use it all of the time when in Sublime. The only time I don't is when I need the extended features of an external tool. – MattDMo Feb 29 '16 at 18:19
  • Which of those plugins is able to detect the movement of whole blocks of text? And not just tell some lines are missing here and appear there but also show with arrows how they moved? – skan Jan 20 '17 at 20:11
  • Thanks to this answer, I installed FileDiffs and added commad to use TortoiseMerge.exe for comparison. It was a huge improvement for my every day use of sublime code comparison. Thanks! – lyubeto Jan 24 '17 at 15:17
43

UPDATE
(Given the upvotes, I feel there is a need for a complete step-by-step explanation...)

  1. In the Menu bar click on File->Open Folder...
  2. Select a folder (the actual folder does not really matter, this step is just to make the FOLDERS sidebar available)
  3. If there is no Side Bar shown yet, make it appear via View -> Side Bar -> Show Side Bar
  4. Use this FOLDERS-titled Side Bar to navigate to the first file you want to compare.
  5. Select it (click on it), hold down ctrl and select the second file.
  6. Having two files selected, right click on one of the two and select Diff Files...

There should be a new Tab now showing the comparison.


Original short answer:
Note that:

The "Diff files" only appears with the "folders" sidebar (to open a folder: File->Open Folder) , not with "open files" sidebar.

  • Is there a way to select those different lines? One appears in red, and the other in green – zeristor Jan 15 '16 at 12:02
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    What do you mean by select? Highlight them and e.g. copy them? Or extracting them? Thanks for the clarification! – stackoverflowwww Jan 15 '16 at 12:31
  • Since the missing lines are prefixed with '- ' I selected one and then matched all of them, selected the full line and copied. A built in way would just be more fluff to forget. – zeristor Jan 15 '16 at 16:04
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    I think it is worth explaining that both files can't be hard opened. If you doubled clicked on both so they are both opened, then you can't highlight both files in the sidebar using the ctrl button. You have to make sure one of them is closed before you can select both files. I found this out because I already had both files open and wanted to use diff files... – Battousai Apr 8 '16 at 5:45
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    @NaveenDA I adapted my answer to be able to remove the broken link. Thanks for the hint! – stackoverflowwww Jun 30 '17 at 8:19
18

UPDATE JAN 2018 - especially for Sublime/Mac

(This is very similar to Marty F's reply above, but addresses some issues from previous responses, combines several different suggestions and discusses the critical distinction that gave me problems at first.)

I'm using Sublime Text 3 (build 3143) on Mac and have been trying for about 30 minutes to find this File Compare feature. I had used it before on Sublime/Mac without any problems, but this time, it was trickier. But, I finally figured it out.

  1. The file format does not need to be UTF-8. I have successfully compared files that are UTF-8, ISO-8559-1, and Windows-1252.

  2. There is no File > Open Folders on Sublime/Mac. Many instructions above start with "Select File > Open Folders," but that doesn't exist on Sublime/Mac.

  3. File compare works on a Project basis. If you want to compare two files, they must be saved to disk and part of the current project.

  4. Ways to open a project

    • If Sublime/Mac is not running or if it's running but no windows are open, drag a folder onto the Sublime app.
    • If Sublime/Mac is running, select "File > Open", navigate to the desired folder, don't select a file or folder and click "Open".
  5. Add a folder to a project. If the files you want to compare are not part of the same hierarchy, first open the folder containing one of the files. Then, select "Project > Add Folder to Project", navigate to the folder you want and click "Open". You will now see two root-level folders in your sidebar.

  6. The Sidebar must be visible. You can either "View > Side Bar > Show Side Bar" or use the shortcut, Command-K, Command-B.

  7. Files must be closed (ie, saved) to compare. Single-clicking a file in the Side Bar does not open the file, but it does display it. You can tell if a file is open if it's listed in the "Open Files" section at the top of the Side Bar. Double-clicking a file or making a modification to a file will automatically change a file's status to "Open". In this case, be sure to close it before trying to compare.

  8. Select files from the folder hierarchy. Standard Mac shorcut here, (single) click the first file, then Command-click the second file. When you select the first file, you'll see its contents, but it's not open. Then, when you Command-click the second file, you'll see its contents, but again, neither are open. You'll notice only one tab in the editing panel.

  9. Control-click is not the same as right-click. This was the one that got me. I use my trackpad and often resort to Control-click as a right-click or secondary-click. This does not work for me. However, since I configured my trackpad in System Preferences to use the bottom-right corner of my trackpad as a right-click, that worked, displaying the contextual menu, with "Delete", "Reveal in Finder", and.... "Diff Files..."

Voilà! I hope this helps someone.

  • 1
    Is it possible to do a folder compare instead of file compare? – DCBoy Jan 24 '18 at 16:54
9

UPDATE OCTOBER 2017 I never knew this feature existed in Sublime Text, but the interface appears to have changed slightly from the previous answer - at least on OS X. Here are the detailed steps I followed:

  1. In the Menu Bar click File -> Open...
  2. Navigate to the FOLDER that contains the files to be compared and with the FOLDER selected, click the Open button, this makes the FOLDERS sidebar appear
  3. In the FOLDERS sidebar, click on the first file to be compared
  4. Hold the Ctrl on Windows or ⌘ on OS X, and click the second file
  5. With both files selected, right click on one and select Diff Files...

This opens a new tab showing the comparison. The first file in red, the second in green.

4

View - Layout and View - Groups will do in latest Sublime 3

eg:

Shift+Alt+2 --> creates 2 columns

Ctrl+2 --> move selected file to column 2

This is for side by side comparison. For actual diff, there is the diff function other already mentioned. Unfortunately, I can't find a way to make columns scroll at the same time, which would be a nice feature.

2

No one is talking about Linux but all above answers will work. Just use Ctrl to select more than one file. If you are looking to compare side by side, Meld is lovely.

0

There's a BeyondCompare plugin as well. It opens the 2 files in a BeyondCompare window. Pretty convenient to open files from the sublime window.

You will need BC3 installation present in the system. After installing the plugin, you will have to provide the path to the installation.

Example:

{
    //Define a custom path to beyond compare
    "beyond_compare_path": "G:/Softwares/Beyond Compare 3/BCompare.exe"
}
0

The Diff Option only appears if the files are in a folder that is part of a Project.

Than you can actually compare files natively right in Sublime Text.

Navigate to the folder containing them through Open Folder... or in a project Select the two files (ie, by holding Ctrl on Windows or ⌘ on macOS) you want to compare in the sidebar Right click and select the Diff files... option.

protected by cassiomolin Jun 17 at 11:10

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