2

I'm trying to find the two smallest elements of a 1xn vector. The catch is that I can't sort it because the indices are linearly dependent upon the values (so sorting the values will screw up to original indices) AND 0 can be one of the elements. Also, elements can repeat. Here's a simplified example of my code:

a = [1,5,8,7,1];

find(a==min(a))

ans =

 1     5

For a, this is the answer I was expecting.

b = [0,8,6,1,9];

find(b==min(b))

ans =

 1

For b, I need it to find the 0 and the 1 so it should give me back 1 and 4 respectively for the indices. Thanks in advance!

2
  • About screwing up the original indices: suppose next to your vector a you have something like a time vector t = [1,2,3,4,5]. You can sort both the same way, should you do: [~, idx] = sort(a). Now executing [t(idx)', a(idx)'] gives you sort of a table with newly sorted t and a.
    – Nras
    Commented Sep 17, 2014 at 6:21
  • 3
    What do you expect as an output for [0 1 1 2 3 4]?
    – Shai
    Commented Sep 17, 2014 at 7:20

2 Answers 2

6

Phil Goddard's answer is perfectly acceptable. However, you did say that you want to do this without sorting, so I'm assuming you don't want to use the sort function at all. What you can do is use min twice. Once you invoke it the first time and you find the index of the minimum element, you would set this location in your array to NaN, then run min an additional time. By setting the location to NaN, you would effectively skip the element that is equal to the smallest at that point in time. After you call min the second time, you'll get the second smallest element.

One small thing you'll need to do afterwards is to clear off the NaN you set in the array after the first min call. You do this by extracting what the minimum value was after the first call, in addition to where this minimum value was located. Once you call min a second time, you'd reset the location of where the first minimum was from NaN back to its original value.

In other words:

a = [1,5,8,7,1];
[min1,ind1] = min(a);
a(ind1) = NaN;
[~,ind2] = min(a);
a(ind1) = min1; %// Copy back to ensure we get original data back

ind1 and ind2 will contain the locations of the two smallest values in a. With your example, I get:

disp([ind1 ind2])

1     5

Similarly, for b, this is what we get with the above code:

disp([ind1 ind2])

1     4
4
  • 1
    I haven't benchmarked, but I would think this is faster than Phil's answer, at least for (very) large matrices. Matlab's sort is quicksort with big-o (n log(n)) whereas find obviously is (n). Commented Sep 17, 2014 at 6:13
  • 1
    @RobertP. - Cool! I actually didn't think about the efficiency until you brought it up. This would essentially perform a linear search twice while Phil's method would sort the elements first then spit out the locations of the smallest two elements. I've always favoured speed!
    – rayryeng
    Commented Sep 17, 2014 at 6:29
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    I agree that Phil's answer was good but it didn't apply to my problem..or rather, it didn't solve it. This method works well and doesn't screw up the order of the array. Thank you! Commented Sep 17, 2014 at 15:35
  • @PaulKiripaul - Cool! You're welcome! BTW, I've made a small change so that you can still do the same thing but without making a copy of the array. I figured that if you're going to do this for a large array, having another copy of this array around probably wouldn't bode well. Check it out, and good luck!
    – rayryeng
    Commented Sep 17, 2014 at 20:53
6

You should use the second output from sort,

>> [~,idx] = sort(a);
>> idx(1:2)
ans = 
  1  5
>> [~,idx] = sort(b);
>> idx(1:2)
ans = 
  1  4
2
  • Hi Phil, Thank you for your response. I tried it the way you suggested and unfortunately it didn't do what I needed it to do. For example: Commented Sep 17, 2014 at 14:33
  • Sorry, couldn't finish my comment in time. In short, I thank you for your answer but it doesn't work for my specific problem. Commented Sep 17, 2014 at 15:33

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