1

I'm currently looking for a bruteforce algorithm and I just can't find a good/simple one.
So I tried to write one myself, but I failed. I'm just too bad at math or whatever. :/
I don't need the algorithm in a specific programming language, if you have one, I can probably port it to the language I need it in.
I'm basically looking for something as simple as this:
(my attempt to write a bruteforce function)

function BruteForce(chars,minLen,maxLen)
    curCharArray = {}
    for i=1, maxLen do
      curCharArray[i] = 0
    end
    generatedString = ""
    for currentLength = minLen, maxLen, 1 do
        curCharArray[currentLength] = 1
        Pos=currentLength
        while Pos>0 do

            if string.len(generatedString) < 1 then 
                generatedString= string.sub(chars,curCharArray[Pos],curCharArray[Pos])
            else
                generatedString= string.sub(generatedString,1,Pos-1) .. string.sub(chars,curCharArray[Pos],curCharArray[Pos])
            end

                print(generatedString)

            curCharArray[Pos] = curCharArray[Pos]+1
            Pos = currentLength
            while curCharArray[Pos]==string.len(chars)+1 do
                curCharArray[Pos]=1
                Pos = Pos-1
            end
        end
    end
end

BruteForceAttack("abc",2,3)

It's written in Lua, you can run the code online here: http://www.lua.org/cgi-bin/demo The output is:

a
ab
ac

a
ab
ac
a
aa
ab
ac
b
ba
bb
bc
c
ca
cb
cc
cca
ccb
ccc
ca
caa
cab
cac
cb
cba
cbb
cbc
cc
cca
ccb
ccc
a
aa
aab
aac
aa
aaa
aab
aac
ab
aba
abb
abc
ac
aca
acb
acc
b
ba
bab
bac
ba
baa
bab
bac
bb
bba
bbb
bbc
bc
bca
bcb
bcc
c
ca
cab
cac
ca
caa
cab
cac
cb
cba
cbb
cbc
cc
cca
ccb
ccc

As you can see some outputs are the same and the minimum length is not being considered. Also, the order is wrong. I wanted the output to be:

aa
ab
ac
ba
bb
bc
ca
cb
cc
aaa
aab
aac
aba
abb
abc
aca
acb
acc
baa
bab
bac
bba
bbb
bbc
bca
bcb
bcc
caa
cab
cac
cba
cbb
cbc
cca
ccb
ccc
  • 4
    You haven't said what you're brute forcing. – pjs Sep 17 '14 at 21:39
  • @pjs I'm just looking for an algorithm that I think is known as "brute-force". – Forivin Sep 17 '14 at 21:41
  • @Forivin: I think you should clarify that you're bruteforcing all 2-3 letter combinations of "abc" where order is irrelevant. – Mooing Duck Sep 17 '14 at 21:55
  • @Forivin "Brute Force" is a type of attack, which usually means trying all possibilities, usually with passwords in mind, meaning you start with "A", the, "AA", "AAA", etc. What you actually appear to be after in your example, is a dictionary creating program. You would generate your dictionary, then feed that text file into something like John The Ripper password cracking program. – SnakeDoc Sep 17 '14 at 21:56
  • Why is the order important? Usually the order isn't important in brute-force. – Mooing Duck Sep 17 '14 at 22:04
5

Unfortunately I don't know LUA but I think idea is clear from this JavaScript snippet:

function generate(current, len, chars) 
{
    if (current.length == len)
        console.log(current);
    if (current.length < len)
        for (var i in chars) {
            generate(current + chars[i], len, chars) 
        }
}

function brute(chars, min, max)
{
    for (var l = min; l <= max; ++l)
        generate("", l, chars);
}

brute(['a', 'b', 'c'], 2, 3);

UPDATE: Snippet without recursion:

function generateNoRecursion(len, chars) 
{
    // Indices that indicate what char to use on corresponding place.
    var indices = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < len; ++i)
        indices.push(0);

    // While all indices in set of chars
    while (indices[0] < chars.length)
    {
        // Print current solution
        var str = "";
        for (var i = 0; i < indices.length; ++i)
            str += chars[indices[i]];
        console.log(str);
        // Go to next solution by incrementing last index and adjusting
        // if it is out of chars set.
        indices[len-1]++;
        for (var i = len-1; i > 0 && indices[i] == chars.length; --i)
        {
            indices[i] = 0;
            indices[i-1]++;
        }
    }
}

function brute(chars, min, max)
{
    for (var l = min; l <= max; ++l)
        generateNoRecursion(l, chars);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Aside: You should take an hour and learn the basics of Lua. The basics are really straightforward and intuitive. It's not until you start learning metatables that it gets even remotely tricky. – Mooing Duck Sep 17 '14 at 21:59
  • 1
    The question wasn't about Lua, so that's okay. – Forivin Sep 17 '14 at 22:06
  • @Forivin: Yeah, the answer is fine. +1. I was just saying one programmer to another: it only takes an hour to learn the basics, and it's a fun language. You should learn it :P – Mooing Duck Sep 17 '14 at 22:26
  • I just tested the code and it does work, but would it be possible to put this algorithm into one function? And maybe also get rid of the self-calling? – Forivin Sep 18 '14 at 1:13
  • @Forivin Added non recursive algorithm as well. It not so elegant as it recursive analogue but also pretty short and clear. – Dmitry Poroh Sep 18 '14 at 5:24
2

Many programming languages have such a capability in some standard library. For example, in Python, you could do:

import itertools 

def print_perms(chars, minlen, maxlen): 
    for n in range(minlen, maxlen+1): 
        for perm in itertools.product(chars, repeat=n): 
            print(''.join(perm)) 

print_perms("abc", 2, 3)
| improve this answer | |
0

Many thanks @Dmitry Poroh for good idea. I implemented code on lua:

symbols = {'A','B','C'}

lenght = {min = 2, max = 3}

function print_t(t)
    for _,v in pairs(t) do
    io.write(v)
    end
    print()
end

function generate(current, len, chars)
    if #current == len then
    print_t(current)
    return
    end
    if #current < len then
    for c = 1, #chars do
    curr = {}
    for i = 1, #current do
        curr[i] = current[i]
    end
    curr[#curr+1] = chars[c]
    generate(curr, len, chars)
    end
    end
end

function brute(chars, min, max)
    for l = min, max do
    generate({}, l, chars)
    end
end

brute(symbols, lenght.min, lenght.max)

Result:

AA
AB
AC
BA
BB
BC
CA
CB
CC
AAA
AAB
AAC
ABA
ABB
ABC
ACA
ACB
ACC
BAA
BAB
BAC
BBA
BBB
BBC
BCA
BCB
BCC
CAA
CAB
CAC
CBA
CBB
CBC
CCA
CCB
CCC

I hope this code is useful to somebody.

| improve this answer | |
-1

When solving a problem, there are different approaches, such as:

  • Brute-Force: Try all possible combinations of the state, to get to the solution, through combination enumeration.

  • Divide & Conquer: when a problem state is difficult at some point, you divide it into 2 or more identical parts that are solved separately, then the partial-solutions is then merged.

  • Dynamic Programming: when the problem is variant on 2 or more dimensions, you rebuild the same problem up to input-size, at each build, you solve the problem linearly by using the optimal solution you got at the size below it.

  • Greedy: At each state, if it's not the solution, step to the best neighbor state, which is basically optimization (maximization\minimization) over the cost g(state) function.

  • Heuristic: At each state, you have the h(state) function, which works like an 8-ball, telling you how close a neighbor state is to the solution state.

  • .. etc

Eaxmple: Search problem.

-- Brute Force example, search array

local array = { "apple", "orange", "pear", "banana" }

for i = 1, #array do

  if array[i] == "banana" then

    -- item found

  end

end
| improve this answer | |

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