11

A memory exhaustion happens when I run my DB seed script in production.

Below is my seed script.

class MembershipTableSeeder extends Seeder 
{
    public function run()
    {
        DB::table('members')->delete();

        foreach (range(1, 99) as $days){
            Members::create(array('membership_code' => 'test'.$days));
        }

        DB::unprepared(file_get_contents(app_path()."/database/seeds/members.sql"));
    }
}

So what I did was add a no-limit on my seed script.

ini_set('memory_limit', '-1');

The problem now is that when I run the script it logs the output into the terminal the content of the SQL script (which is very, very big).

Is there a good way of running a SQL dump inside my DB seeds that doesn't consume much memory? What I did now was run it manually:

mysql -uuser -p db < script.sql
6
  • How many rows it contains? Sep 18 '14 at 7:07
  • using the mysql binary is probably the best way to go about it. The alternative parse and split your SQL into smaller statements and run multiple queries.
    – cdr
    Sep 18 '14 at 7:09
  • It's just 16MB sql file.
    – olleh
    Sep 18 '14 at 7:26
  • Do you run php in safe mode?
    – Vit Kos
    Sep 18 '14 at 7:51
  • Just a suggestion about the first part: Member::create in a loop - don't do it, instead use DB::table(..)->insert(..) and pass there array of rows to insert. It will be much faster and less memory consuming. Sep 18 '14 at 8:27
15

For others who prefer a more Laravel-ish solution, this is how I handled it:

/**
 * This class is responsible for running the data dump sql.
 * It is recommended to update this class instead of creating new ones for new database content dumps.
 */
class DatabaseDumpSeeder extends Seeder
{
    /**
     * Run the database seeds.
     * @throws \Exception
     */
    public function run()
    {
        // Note: these dump files must be generated with DELETE (or TRUNCATE) + INSERT statements
        $sql = file_get_contents(__DIR__ . '/dumps/dump-20150709.sql');

        if (! str_contains($sql, ['DELETE', 'TRUNCATE'])) {
            throw new Exception('Invalid sql file. This will not empty the tables first.');
        }

        // split the statements, so DB::statement can execute them.
        $statements = array_filter(array_map('trim', explode(';', $sql)));

        foreach ($statements as $stmt) {
            DB::statement($stmt);
        }
    }
}
3
  • I find this approach very memory exhausting, the script parses and iterates the SQL file, what if you have a file over 5000 lines? Although this is just my opinion.
    – olleh
    Oct 2 '15 at 2:49
  • Yes, running sql scripts from php is very memory exhausting. I strongly advise not to use a database seeder to import production data. It is only for test/development data.
    – winkbrace
    Oct 3 '15 at 9:26
  • 2
    A couple of thousand lines will be fine, nothing major. Anything more than that though and I'd look at seeding it yourself from mysql, or better yet just execute a mysql loadfile from laravel by running a command against the console.
    – Oddman
    Dec 21 '15 at 2:01
12

The problem happens because when using Db::unprepared it also logs the query to the laravel.log file, making in background much more actions then you think, from this side you have memory exhaust. If you are not running the safe mode I would stick to executing the console command like this:

exec("mysql -u ".\Config::get('database.mysql.user')." -p".\Config::get('database.mysql.password')." ".\Config::get('database.mysql.database')." < script.sql")
3
  • I would give it a try for a more Laravel-ish solutinon, but if your file is really big (a common case) this would not help
    – Vit Kos
    Oct 7 '14 at 20:33
  • thanks for the tip! I turned it off cause my DB dump was too large.
    – olleh
    Oct 8 '14 at 4:25
  • How about multiple .sql?
    – Rbex
    Apr 27 '20 at 10:13
2

Create Seeder File "PostalCodeTableSeeder.php" in Project_directory/database/seeds

use Illuminate\Database\Seeder;

class PostalCodeTableSeeder extends Seeder {
    /**
     * Run the database seeds.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function run()
    {
        // =============================================================
        // file Path -> Project/app/configs/database.php
        // get the database name, database username, database password
        // =============================================================
        $db     = \Config::get('database.connections.mysql.database');
        $user   = \Config::get('database.connections.mysql.username');
        $pass   = \Config::get('database.connections.mysql.password');

        // $this->command->info($db);
        // $this->command->info($user);
        // $this->command->info($pass);

        // running command line import in php code
        exec("mysql -u " . $user . " -p" . $pass . " " . $db . " < postal_codes.sql");
        // postal_codes.sql is inside root folder
    }
}

Also add the class name into Project_directory/database/seed/DatabaseSeeder.php like code below

use Illuminate\Database\Seeder;

class DatabaseSeeder extends Seeder
{
    /**
     * Run the database seeds.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function run()
    {
        $this->call(PostalCodeTableSeeder::class);
        // $this->call(UsersTableSeeder::class);
    }
}
2
  • 1
    add some explanation Sep 23 '16 at 4:53
  • ` exec("mysql -u " . $user . " -p" . $pass . " " . $db . " < postal_codes.sql");` How about multiple .sql?
    – Rbex
    Apr 27 '20 at 10:12
0

I had a strange issue where importing a large SQL file as a migration caused the line to not be added to the migrations table.

This is how I fixed it.

$path = 'database/data.sql';
$command =  "mysql -h".env('DB_HOST')." -u".env('DB_USERNAME')." ".(env('DB_PASSWORD')?"-p'".env('DB_PASSWORD')."'":'')." ".env('DB_DATABASE')." < ".$path;
exec($command);

I notice that there are similar answers to this, but my method checks .env and not the app config, support for remote MySQL hosts, also works with no password on local and passwords with special characters that would break the command line.

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