0
20140918-17:31:19.835
34=11
52=20140918-17:31:19.812
273=17:31:19.797
273=17:31:19.797
273=17:31:19.797
273=17:31:19.797
20140918-17:31:19.837
34=12
52=20140918-17:31:19.813
273=17:31:19.797
273=17:31:19.797
273=17:31:19.797
273=17:31:19.797
20140918-17:31:19.838
34=13
52=20140918-17:31:19.813
273=17:31:19.797
273=17:31:19.797
273=17:31:19.797
273=17:31:19.797

I have this input and want to format it like this:

34=11 20140918-17:31:19.835
    52=20140918-17:31:19.812
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
34=12 20140918-17:31:19.837
    52=20140918-17:31:19.813
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
34=13 20140918-17:31:19.838
    52=20140918-17:31:19.813
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797

I have no shell scripting experience, I'm afraid this question might be inappropriate but if you could point me to a good shell scripting tutorial that would get me started I'd appreciate it!

4

You can do this using awk:

awk '!/=/{m=$0; next}m{$0=$0 FS m; m=0}/^52=/{$0="\t"$0}/^273=/{$0="\t\t"$0}1' file

How it works:

  • !/=/{m=$0; next} - If the line doesn't contain =, the line record ($0) is assigned to the m variable. next skips to the next line as no further processing is needed.

  • m{$0=$0 FS m; m=0} - If m is defined (greater than zero), append the current line ($0) with the field separator (FS) and the variable m (previous line). Finally, reset the m variable to zero as we need to make sure this code block keeps getting executed immediately after the line that does not contain an = character.

  • /^52=/{$0="\t"$0} - If the current line starts with 52=, prefix the current line record ($0) with a tab character (\t)

  • /^273=/{$0="\t\t"$0} - If the current line starts with 273=, prefix the current line record with two tab characters.

  • 1 - This is just a little shorthand trick for saying {print} regardless of any condition. The 1 is just telling awk print is true. You could really substitute this with anything truthy since awk's default action is to print if a condition is true and no following code block is provided.

On any UNIX system, awk is the go to language for manipulating text files.

I've found this intro to be exceptionally concise. Also, awk.info has a wide collection of overviews and tutorials. As far as documentation goes, the GNU Awk User's Guide is pretty comprehensive.

  • 1
    As you are answering a question posted by someone with "no shell scripting experience", it would greatly increase the quality of your answer if you provided some explanation of how it works. – Tom Fenech Sep 18 '14 at 19:51
  • 1
    Agreed, I'm getting to that. – John B Sep 18 '14 at 19:52
  • 1
    Thanks and I'd really appreciate any explanation you can provide as well. – shaz Sep 18 '14 at 20:21
2

Here is an example using sed

sed -r '
    /^2014/ {                          # For lines starting with 2014
        N;                             # Append next line to pattern space
        s/^([^\n]+)\n([^\n]+)/\2 \1/;  # Merge the first line with second
    }
    /^52/ {                            # For lines starting with 52
        s/^/\t/                        # Add a tab in the front of the line
    }
    /^273/ {                           # For lines starting with 273
        s/^/\t\t/                      # Add a tab in the front of the line
    }' file
34=11 20140918-17:31:19.835
    52=20140918-17:31:19.812
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
34=12 20140918-17:31:19.837
    52=20140918-17:31:19.813
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
34=13 20140918-17:31:19.838
    52=20140918-17:31:19.813
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797
        273=17:31:19.797

As a one-liner:

sed -r '/^2014/N;s/^([^\n]+)\n([^\n]+)/\2 \1/;/^52/s/^/\t/;/^273/s/^/\t\t/' file
  • only thing is the spaces are not maintained as you used \t and seems like he wanted 4 spaces for 2nd line n 8 for leaf level lines. – Arun Sangal Sep 18 '14 at 20:15
  • @ArunSangal I had that in place first then edited out after reading the question title. Fixed! – jaypal singh Sep 18 '14 at 20:15
0

AWK is great as Jaypal, John described with the solution. As you are new, you can do the same by running basic Unix/Linux level commands and it'll help you understand what those commands are doing by seeing their man pages.

Note the following solution is a not the efficient solution like John/JayPal provided but will get you exactly what I meant above and with your output request.

Assuming your file name is 1.txt" which contains the data, then run the following runme.sh

 #!/bin/bash
 grep "^[0-9][0-9]=[0-9][0-9]$" 1.txt > 2-2.txt
 grep "^[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]*.*-[0-9][0-9]*\:[0-9][0-9]*.*\.[0-9][0-9]*$" 1.txt > datetime.txt
 grep "^[0-9][0-9]=.*-[0-9][0-9]*\:[0-9][0-9]*.*\.[0-9][0-9]*$" 1.txt > equal_datetime.txt
 grep "^[0-9][0-9][0-9]=.*[0-9]$" 1.txt > 3_eq_lines.txt

 paste 2-2.txt datetime.txt equal_datetime.txt  > headers.txt
 c=1; while read line1 line2 line3; do echo -e "$line1 $line2\n    $line3"; echo -e "`tail -n +$c 3_eq_lines.txt | head -4|sed "s/^/        /"`"; ((c+=3)); done < headers.txt
 rm 2-2.txt datetime.txt equal_datetime.txt 3_eq_lines.txt headers.txt
0

Maybe perl

perl -lnE '$l1=$_,next unless m/=/;        #store the line without =
           s/$/ $l1/ if m/^\d\d=\d\d$/;    #merge this line with the stored
           s/^/\t/ if m/^\d+=\d{8}/;       #if the = is followed by 8 digits -> 1xtab
           s/^/\t\t/ if m/^\d+=\d\d:/;     #if the = is followed by 2digits and : -> 2xtab
           print $_;' filename

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