142

How can I convert a string "Hello" to an array ["H","e","l","l","o"] in Swift?

In Objective-C I have used this:

NSMutableArray *characters = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:[myString length]];
for (int i=0; i < [myString length]; i++) {
    NSString *ichar  = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%c", [myString characterAtIndex:i]];
    [characters addObject:ichar];
}

12 Answers 12

358

It is even easier in Swift:

let string : String = "Hello 🐶🐮 🇩🇪"
let characters = Array(string)
println(characters)
// [H, e, l, l, o,  , 🐶, 🐮,  , 🇩🇪]

This uses the facts that

  • an Array can be created from a SequenceType, and
  • String conforms to the SequenceType protocol, and its sequence generator enumerates the characters.

And since Swift strings have full support for Unicode, this works even with characters outside of the "Basic Multilingual Plane" (such as 🐶) and with extended grapheme clusters (such as 🇩🇪, which is actually composed of two Unicode scalars).


Update: As of Swift 2, String does no longer conform to SequenceType, but the characters property provides a sequence of the Unicode characters:

let string = "Hello 🐶🐮 🇩🇪"
let characters = Array(string.characters)
print(characters)

This works in Swift 3 as well.


Update: As of Swift 4, String is (again) a collection of its Characters:

let string = "Hello 🐶🐮 🇩🇪"
let characters = Array(string)
print(characters)
// ["H", "e", "l", "l", "o", " ", "🐶", "🐮", " ", "🇩🇪"]
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Do you have any idea why trying to join (let joined = ", ".join(characters);) the array results in an 'String' is not identical to 'Character' error? – Mohamad Jan 3 '15 at 21:55
  • 3
    @Mohamad: Enumerating a string produces a sequence of characters, but ", ".join(...) expects an array of strings. devxoul's answer below shows how you could split into an array of strings. – Martin R Jan 3 '15 at 22:07
  • 2
    @Fonix: characters is a collection and a view on the strings characters. Creating an array from the characters makes a copy. – Of course can access the characters directly: for i in string.characters.indices { print(string.characters[i]) } or just for c in string.characters { print(c) } – Martin R Feb 28 '17 at 6:52
  • 2
    @Fonix: ... On the other hand, random indexing into strings can be slow and it can be advantageous to create an array with all characters once. Example: stackoverflow.com/questions/40371929/…. – Martin R Feb 28 '17 at 6:55
  • 2
    @DaniSpringer: Swift 4 is currently in beta, you'll need Xcode 9 beta: developer.apple.com/swift/resources. – Martin R Aug 13 '17 at 16:10
104

Edit (Swift 4)

In Swift 4, you don't have to use characters to use map(). Just do map() on String.

let letters = "ABC".map { String($0) }
print(letters) // ["A", "B", "C"]
print(type(of: letters)) // Array<String>

Or if you'd prefer shorter: "ABC".map(String.init) (2-bytes 😀)

Edit (Swift 2 & Swift 3)

In Swift 2 and Swift 3, You can use map() function to characters property.

let letters = "ABC".characters.map { String($0) }
print(letters) // ["A", "B", "C"]

Original (Swift 1.x)

Accepted answer doesn't seem to be the best, because sequence-converted String is not a String sequence, but Character:

$ swift
Welcome to Swift!  Type :help for assistance.
  1> Array("ABC")
$R0: [Character] = 3 values {
  [0] = "A"
  [1] = "B"
  [2] = "C"
}

This below works for me:

let str = "ABC"
let arr = map(str) { s -> String in String(s) }

Reference for a global function map() is here: http://swifter.natecook.com/func/map/

| improve this answer | |
  • 12
    Slightly shorter: arr = map(str) { String($0) } – Martin R Jan 3 '15 at 22:08
  • 1
    Use the Array initializer instead: Array("ABC".characters) – chrisamanse Sep 30 '16 at 13:42
  • 1
    @chrisamanse, There's no difference between "ABC".characters and Array("ABC".characters). – devxoul Sep 30 '16 at 17:08
  • 2
    It's different in Swift 3. "ABC".characters returns a type String.CharacterView. To convert it to an array, specifically of type, [Character], you'd have to use the Array initializer on it. – chrisamanse Oct 1 '16 at 3:56
  • 2
    @chrisamanse Oh, I didn't know that. I was wrong. Thanks for pointing it out. By the way, I intended [String] instead of [Character] because op wanted a string array :) – devxoul Oct 1 '16 at 18:09
23

There is also this useful function on String: components(separatedBy: String)

let string = "1;2;3"
let array = string.components(separatedBy: ";")
print(array) // returns ["1", "2", "3"]

Works well to deal with strings separated by a character like ";" or even "\n"

| improve this answer | |
8

Updated for Swift 4

Here are 3 ways.

//array of Characters
let charArr1 = [Character](myString)

//array of String.element
let charArr2 = Array(myString)

for char in myString {
  //char is of type Character
}

In some cases, what people really want is a way to convert a string into an array of little strings with 1 character length each. Here is a super efficient way to do that:

//array of String
var strArr = myString.map { String($0)}

Swift 3

Here are 3 ways.

let charArr1 = [Character](myString.characters)
let charArr2 = Array(myString.characters)
for char in myString.characters {
  //char is of type Character
}

In some cases, what people really want is a way to convert a string into an array of little strings with 1 character length each. Here is a super efficient way to do that:

var strArr = myString.characters.map { String($0)}

Or you can add an extension to String.

extension String {
   func letterize() -> [Character] {
     return Array(self.characters)
  }
}

Then you can call it like this:

let charArr = "Cat".letterize()
| improve this answer | |
4
    let string = "hell0"
    let ar = Array(string.characters)
    print(ar)
| improve this answer | |
3

Martin R answer is the best approach, and as he said, because String conforms the SquenceType protocol, you can also enumerate a string, getting each character on each iteration.

let characters = "Hello"
var charactersArray: [Character] = []

for (index, character) in enumerate(characters) {
    //do something with the character at index
    charactersArray.append(character)
}

println(charactersArray)
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Or just for character in characters { charactersArray.append(character)} without the enumeration() – Tieme Nov 14 '14 at 13:40
3

In Swift 4, as String is a collection of Character, you need to use map

let array1 = Array("hello") // Array<Character>
let array2 = Array("hello").map({ "\($0)" }) // Array<String>
let array3 = "hello".map(String.init) // Array<String>
| improve this answer | |
3

An easy way to do this is to map the variable and return each Character as a String:

let someText = "hello"

let array = someText.map({ String($0) }) // [String]

The output should be ["h", "e", "l", "l", "o"].

| improve this answer | |
1

You can also create an extension:

var strArray = "Hello, playground".Letterize()

extension String {
    func Letterize() -> [String] {
        return map(self) { String($0) }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1
func letterize() -> [Character] {
    return Array(self.characters)
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Can you provide more information why this will work? :) – pix Oct 27 '16 at 17:52
  • 1
    @pix I think he meant for this to be a function defined in an extension of String. I'll add that to my answer. – ScottyBlades Sep 20 '17 at 6:28
1

for the function on String: components(separatedBy: String)

in Swift 5.1

have change to:

string.split(separator: "/")

| improve this answer | |
0

Suppose you have four text fields "otpOneTxt","otpTwoTxt","otpThreeTxt","otpFourTxt" and a string "getOtp"

            let getup = "5642"
            let array = self.getOtp.map({ String($0) })
            
            otpOneTxt.text = array[0] //5
           
            otpTwoTxt.text = array[1] //6
           
            otpThreeTxt.text = array[2] //4
            
            otpFourTxt.text = array[3] //2
| improve this answer | |

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