12

I have a string that looks something like this:

"Line 1\nLine 2"

When I call length on it, though, it's one character short:

"Line 1\nLine 2".length // 13

Looking a little closer:

"Line 1\nLine 2".charAt(6)

I find that the \n is being replaced by a single character, which looks like:

"
"

Is there a way to escape that new line into a \n?

0
12

Whenever you get Javascript to interpret this string, the '\n' will be rendered as a newline (which is a single character, hence the length.)

To use the string as a literal backslash-n, try escaping the backslash with another one. Like so:

"Line 1\\nLine 2"

If you can't do this when the string is created, you can turn the one string into the other with this:

"Line 1\nLine 2".replace(/\n/, "\\n");

If you might have multiple occurrences of the newline, you can get them all at once by making the regex global, like this:

"Line 1\nLine 2\nLine 3".replace(/\n/g, "\\n");
3
  • Does not work if the OS uses different newline character. – Boris Marinov Feb 3 '16 at 13:53
  • That's not what I observe. Could you provide steps to reproduce any failure you may have seen? The environment in which Javascript runs abstracts away the underlying implementation details of the specific operating system. It's true that the metaphor 'leaks' sometimes, but that does not happen in this case, on both Firefox and Node on Windows and Linux. – Jon Carter Feb 3 '16 at 16:49
6

\n is the newline character. You can use "Line 1\\nLine 2" to escape it.

Keep in mind that the actual representation of a new line depends on the system and could be one or two characters long: \r\n, \n, or \r

0

In JavaScript, a backslash in a string literal is the start of an escape code, for instance backslash n for a newline. But what if you want an actual backslash in the resulting string? One of the escape codes is backslash backslash, for an actual backslash.

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