37

I am having trouble rounding a GPA double to 2 decimal places. (ex of a GPA needed to be rounded: 3.67924) I am currently using ceil to round up, but it currently outputs it as a whole number (368)

here is what I have right now

if (cin >> gpa) {
    if (gpa >= 0 && gpa <= 5) {
           // valid number

           gpa = ceil(gpa * 100);

           break;
    } else {
           cout << "Please enter a valid GPA (0.00 - 5.00)" << endl;
           cout << "GPA: ";

    }
}

using the above code with 3.67924 would output 368 (which is what I want, but just without the period between the whole number and the decimals). How can I fix this?

4
  • 3
    After you multiplied by 100 and rounded, divide back by 100. Or, if all you need is to print with two decimal places, keep the value unchanged and use setprecision when printing. Sep 19, 2014 at 2:12
  • The title mentions rounding up, but the problem statement mentions rounding. Rounding could be implemented with gpa = floor((100.*gpa)+.5)/100.
    – rcgldr
    Sep 19, 2014 at 3:09
  • 1
    would output 368 (which is what I want, but just without the period between the whole number and the decimals). How can I fix this? you would do this gpa /= 100 assuming gpa is a double. Sep 19, 2014 at 3:30
  • 1
    Read floating-point-gui.de Sep 19, 2014 at 4:22

9 Answers 9

51

To round a double up to 2 decimal places, you can use:

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

int main() {
    double value = 0.123;
    value = std::ceil(value * 100.0) / 100.0;
    std::cout << value << std::endl; // prints 0.13
    return 0;
}

To round up to n decimal places, you can use:

double round_up(double value, int decimal_places) {
    const double multiplier = std::pow(10.0, decimal_places);
    return std::ceil(value * multiplier) / multiplier;
}

This method won't be particularly fast, if performance becomes an issue you may need another solution.

1
  • 9
    In my specific case I preferred to use std::round instead of std::ceil, but your solution was absolutely perfect. Thanks!
    – Brutus
    Mar 31, 2020 at 12:51
18

If it is just a matter of writing to screen then to round the number use

std::cout.precision(3);
std::cout << gpa << std::endl;

see

floating points are not exactly represented so by internally rounding the value and then using that in your calculations you are increasing the inexactness.

7

You can't round doubles to two decimal places. Doubles don't have decimal places. They have binary places, and they aren't commensurable with decimal places.

If you want decimal places, you must use a decimal radix, e.g. when formatting for output with printf("%.2f", ...).

9
  • 11
    True, but not necessarily helpful - it's still common enough to want the nearest double to the intended 2-decimal-digit number, for example - as a step before doing some other calculation to minimise further errors. Sep 19, 2014 at 3:33
  • 1
    @TonyD He says he wants 3.68. Nothing about the 'nearest'.
    – user207421
    Sep 19, 2014 at 3:47
  • 1
    @TonyDelroy And premature rounding will cause further errors.
    – user207421
    Jun 26, 2020 at 8:13
  • 1
    @TonyDelroy There can be what value? The time to do the rounding is at the end when you arrive at the decimal radix.
    – user207421
    Oct 24, 2020 at 9:10
  • 1
    This answer is the right one actually. The result is simply wrong in some cases if you use binary floating point number, like round(0.575, 2) won't be correct using any of the other answers. You just have to use decimal numbers to get the right answer.
    – Yuhta
    Aug 3, 2023 at 23:13
5

When you are trying to store values upto n decimal values in a variable . You have to multiple that value with 10^n and divide the same with 10^n. Afterward use type operator to manipulate in the program. Here is the example : -

 float a,b,c,d,sum;

 cin>>a>>b>>c>>d; // reading decimal values

sum=(a*b*c*d);

sum=round(sum*100)/100; // here it is for 2 decimal points

if((float)sum < (float) 9.58)
  cout<<"YES\n";
else
  cout<<"NO\n";  
1

Try this. But your cout statement in else condition, so it won't give the desired output for 3.67924.

if (cin >> gpa)
{     
    if (gpa >= 0 && gpa <= 5) {
        // valid number

        gpa = ceil(gpa * 100);
        gpa=gpa/100;
        break;
    } 
    else
    {    
       cout << "Please enter a valid GPA (0.00 - 5.00)" << endl;    
       cout << "GPA: ";
    }
}
1

Example: you want 56.899999999999 to be output as a string with 2 decimal point which is 56.89.

First, convert them
value = 56.89 * 1000 = 5689
factor = 100
- 1 decimal point = 10
- 2 decimal point = 100
- 3 decimal point = 1000
etc

int integerValue;
int decimal;
std::string result;
function ( int value , int factor)
{
    integerValue= (value / factor) * factor; //(5689 / 100) * 100 = 5600
    decimal = value - integerValue;  // 5689 - 5600;
    result = std::to_string((int)(value/factor) + "." + std::to_string(decimal); 
    // result = "56" + "." + "89" 
    // lastly, print result
}

Not sure if this can help?

0

This can be done with a combination of fixed and setprecision().

 cout << fixed << setprecision(2);
 cout << gpa;
-1
std::string precision_2(float number)
{
    int decimal_part = (number * 100) - ((int)number * 100);
    if (decimal_part > 10) {
        return std::to_string((int)number) + "." + std::to_string(decimal_part);
    } else {
        return std::to_string((int)number) + ".0" + std::to_string(decimal_part);
    }
}

Handles well for all positive floats. A minor modification will make it work for -ves as well.

1
  • This is an old thread which has been answered before by many people. Thanks for contributing to the community, but maybe focus your effort on recently opened unanswered questions.
    – jpnadas
    Jun 23, 2020 at 11:41
-2
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

// Rounds a value to n decimal places according to the precision, using the rounding rule of natural numbers
double round_d(double var, int precision=2)
{
    // if precision = 3 then
    // 37.66666 * 10^3 =37666.66
    // 37666.66 + .5 =37667.1    for rounding off value
    // then type cast to <int> so value is 37667
    // then divided by 10^3 so the value converted into 37.667
    if (precision < 0) precision = 0;
    double value = (var >= 0) ? (int)(var * pow(10, precision) + .5) : (int)(var * pow(10, precision) - .5);
    return value / pow(10, precision);
}


int main()
{
    double var1 = 37.66666,
           var2 = 48.7432,
           var3 = 59.8653,
           var4 = -6.305,
           var5 = 1000.296,
           var6 = 500;
    cout << round(var1, 2) << endl <<
            round(var2, 3) << endl <<
            round(var3, 1) << endl <<
            round(var4) << endl <<
            round(var5, 0) << endl <<
            round(var6, 3);

    return 0;
}

// Output:
// 37.67
// 48.743
// 59.9
// -6.31
// 1000
// 500
6
  • Any reason to not use std::round? Nov 27, 2023 at 7:52
  • std::round rounds the double or float values to the nearest integer value. Author asked how to round a double up to 2 (or any number of) decimal places.
    – Doom
    Nov 27, 2023 at 15:51
  • I'm not saying to replace the entire function with std::round. Just the part of it where you do (var >= 0) ? (int)(... + .5) : (int)(... - .5). Nov 27, 2023 at 15:56
  • Oh, that's it! Well, maybe. What's the difference, why is std::round better than cast to int? Faster?
    – Doom
    Nov 27, 2023 at 16:04
  • At least it's less typing and expresses the intent better. I'm also sure that std::round will always do the right thing, but I'm not sure about your approach. What will happen numbers larger than what's representable by an int? Probably nothing good. Nov 27, 2023 at 16:13

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