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How can you completely uninstall (remove files that belong to a certain package) in Mac OS X? Can this be done using a command in the terminal?

I have installed a .pkg package on my Mac and I am wondering as to how I can uninstall the entire package without using a third party application such as UninstallPKG?

I am wondering whether uninstalling .dmg files also require third party applications or is it possible to uninstall them entering a command in the terminal?

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3 Answers 3

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Use this command in terminal for check the list of package and uninstalled your files.

$ pkgutil --pkgs # list all installed packages

Once you've uninstalled the files, you can remove the receipt with:

$ sudo pkgutil --forget the-package-name.pkg

After visually inspecting the list of files you can do something like:

$ pkgutil --pkg-info the-package-name.pkg # check the location
$ cd / # assuming the package is rooted at /...
$ pkgutil --only-files --files the-package-name.pkg | tr '\n' '\0' | xargs -n 1 -0 sudo rm -i

Be careful of this last step. The list of directories output by pkgutil --files can include important shared directories like usr, which you don't want to remove.

$ pkgutil --only-dirs --files the-package-name.pkg | tr '\n' '\0' | xargs -n 1 -0 sudo rm -ir

Copied from here (Wayback Machine snapshot of the original)

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    I tried the above command to remove files from a package, but it didn't work. rm -i prompts the user for confirmation, but stdin is coming from /dev/null thanks to xargs (man7.org/linux/man-pages/man1/xargs.1.html), so you can't confirm anything. You just get a series of many prompts, and no files removed. Did anybody else have success?
    – LarsH
    Feb 8, 2017 at 17:14
  • How do you uninstall the files/how do you know which files in which directories are related to a specific package?
    – Tadej
    Aug 16, 2017 at 7:09
  • @LarsH you need to use xargs -n 1 -0 sudo rm -if. It may take a while too. Oct 28, 2019 at 3:49
  • @Jorge Thanks. I figured that out later; see my answer.
    – LarsH
    Oct 28, 2019 at 13:08
  • If you are only removing directories in the final step, why not use sudo rmdir as the command? That way it will only remove directories which are empty. Mar 13, 2020 at 12:47
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I'm modifying @karthikeyan's answer, which didn't work for me.

At a command line, use the following to find the desired package name:

$ pkgutil --pkgs | grep -i {keyword} | less

where {keyword} is a string you expect to see in the package name.

To find the package location (the root directory that all file listings will be relative to), use

$ pkgutil --pkg-info package-name.pkg

Use this to list the package's installed files:

$ pkgutil --files package-name.pkg

After visually inspecting the list of files you can do something like this to remove them:

$ cd / # assuming the package location is /
$ pkgutil --only-files --files package-name.pkg | tr '\n' '\0' | xargs -n 1 -0 -p sudo rm

Be careful of the next (final) step, which removes directories. The list of directories output by pkgutil --files can include important shared directories like usr, which you don't want to remove. -p causes xargs to prompt for confirmation, but don't get trigger-happy. (You should be safe with rmdir too, because it will only remove empty directories. But some people will need to tweak the command line, so it's better to be clear!)

$ pkgutil --only-dirs --files package-name.pkg | tr '\n' '\0' | xargs -n 1 -0 -p sudo rmdir

Once you've uninstalled the files, you can remove the system record of that package:

$ sudo pkgutil --forget package-name.pkg

Sources: pkgutil man page and this post.

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    The .pkg extension isn't needed, at least on the pkg-info step.
    – Jon L.
    May 14, 2017 at 3:45
  • Presumably, if the info step says location: Applications/xxx.app and the --files step shows me nothing outside Contents/ I can feel fairly confident that just dragging the app to trash has removed everything? Mar 8, 2018 at 14:35
  • There is also pkgutil --unlink <package-id>, although not documented
    – Pete
    Jan 21, 2019 at 20:11
  • See also gist.github.com/githubutilities/b5318d08a4b970d104f1. (very similar, more compact) Oct 28, 2019 at 4:07
  • @Jorge Please explain your edit: why do you consider -i on the rm preferable to -p on the xargs?
    – LarsH
    Oct 28, 2019 at 13:14
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The concept of PKG uninstallation is not there in OS X. A PKG/MPKG can have certain pre install and post install scripts associated with that. What is done in PKG scripts is always upto the PKG creator. As a layman we cannot go ahead and uninstall a PKG.

But at the same time there are command lines that can do a complete reverse engineering on PKG files. It can extract the scripts and other related information. The links given below will give you some info

http://s.sudre.free.fr/Stuff/Ivanhoe/FLAT.html http://www.mactech.com/articles/mactech/Vol.26/26.02/TheFlatPackage/index.html

There are few uninstall/cleaner apps available on OS X. Most of them do a search in known directories (like /Library/Preferences, /Library/Application Support etc) with the app name/pkg name or bundle identifier. This is one way to do a complete removal.

DMG are not installer files. They are Disk Image files. It can inturn have .apps, pkg, mpkgs, other files etc. What gets installed is the installers inside DMG. DMG has to be mount to read the contents and un-mount when done.

http://osxdaily.com/2011/12/17/mount-a-dmg-from-the-command-line-in-mac-os-x/

This link gives info on how to mount a DMG

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