3

I have the following entities. Category, Topic, Post, Member. They are related by the following

  • Category has a list of Topic
  • Topic has a list of posts
  • Post has a Member

Below are the classes

public class Category
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public virtual IList<Topic> Topics { get; set; }
}

public class Topic
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreateDate { get; set; }
    public virtual Category Category { get; set; }
    public virtual IList<Post> Posts { get; set; }
    public virtual MembershipUser User { get; set; }
}

public class Post
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string PostContent { get; set; }
    public DateTime DateCreated { get; set; }
    public DateTime DateEdited { get; set; }
    public virtual Topic Topic { get; set; }
    public virtual MembershipUser User { get; set; }
}

public class MembershipUser
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string UserName { get; set; }

    etc....

}

I want to be able to efficiently do the following queries

  1. Get the latest post in a Category including the member who made the post (By CategoryId)
  2. Get the latest post in a Topic including the member who made the post (By TopicId)

I have been using the following with Include() - But I'd like to know if there is a more efficient way of doing this...?

Query 1

_context.Category
     .Where(x => x.Id == categoryId)
     .Include(x => x.Topics.Select(p => p.Posts.Select(u => u.User)))
     .SelectMany(x => x.Topics)
     .SelectMany(x => x.Posts)
     .OrderByDescending(x => x.DateCreated)
     .FirstOrDefault();

Query 2

_context.Topic
       .Where(x => x.Id == topicId)
       .Include(x => x.Posts.Select(u => u.User))
       .SelectMany(x => x.Posts)
       .OrderByDescending(x => x.DateCreated)
       .FirstOrDefault();

Any help or pointers greatly appreciated.

4

If you are looking for efficient performance you may be interested in writing a very simple MARS stored procedure that has all the data you want. You can use the Translate function on each result set to materialize model objects. Entity Framework will automatically fix up your navigation properties.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/jj691402.aspx

If you don't want to create a proc it is often more efficient to execute multiple simple queries. I often filter a linq to entities query with an in memory list of Ids like so: qry.where(x=>list.contains(x.Id)).

Edit as of 9/21/2014

Most developers think an efficient query as one that executes fast and only returns the data you need. This is pretty much true. However, an efficient data access layer is one that reuses a limited number of queries that execute fast. Sometimes developers get in their own way trying to make each individual query as efficient as possible not realizing that they are causing sql server to manage too many execution plans and slowing overall performance. I would suggest you try to stick to two or three methods for a given table. I would start with a query that returns one topic with related data and one that returns a list of topics with the data you need for this scenario.

The following method would go in you DataContext class:

public Topic GetTopic(int topicId) 
{
      return this.Topics.Include("Posts.User").Single(x => x.Id = topicId);
}

This could go in your Topic class:

public Post GetMostRecentPost()
{
    return this.Posts.OrderByDescending(x => x.DateCreated).FirstOrDefault();
}

Alternatively if you actually only ever want to get the most recent post and never otherwise find yourself needing to query topics with all their posts you could use the following query in your context.

public Post GetMostRecentPost(int topicId)
{
  return this.Posts.Include(x => x.Topic).Include(x=>x.User).where(x => x.TopicId == topicId).OrderByDescending(x => x.DateCreated).FirstOrDefault();
}

As a general rule of thumb, if you are trying to return a Post, it is best to start the query with context.Post and try to build your query off of that. Try to avoid projection queries like select or selectmany unless you are intending on returning anonymous object and are willing to perform sql profiling to make sure the query looks as intended.

9
  • Thanks for the comment. I'm trying to avoid stored procedures. Also, I've tried executing multiple simple queries using contains() for the IDs, but the query seemed to be slower? – leen3o Sep 20 '14 at 6:27
  • looking at your query again I realized you have a pretty simple query need. Three tables is not that many. Try this: – Chris Perry Sep 20 '14 at 12:25
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    context.Topics.Include("Posts.User").Single(x=>x. Id=topicId).selectmany(x=>x.Posts).orderbydescending(x=>x.DateCreated).FirstOrDefault() – Chris Perry Sep 20 '14 at 12:36
  • The important thing to remember is to keep your query as simple as possible and do the projection in memory after you have your data retrieved. If the above query does not work, please let me know. – Chris Perry Sep 20 '14 at 12:40
  • Thanks for the example. It's almost exactly what I have above. Although your include is before your Single() query. I think it's supposed to be after, to make it more efficient (See official docs link)? msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/data/jj574232.aspx - Also why do you use Single() and not FirstOrDefault()? Thanks – leen3o Sep 21 '14 at 6:51
2
+50

First of all you should start by measuring the the current query time. Considering the FirstOrDefault() I expect this query to run really fast.

I usually use Sql Profiler for these kind of things. In web applications I usually also have StackExchange.MiniProfiler or Glimpse. Both can be hooked into EF to provide exact query times.

The problem with Include is that EF is really bad at joining data because they use they join the data instead of loading several collections. I wrote a blog post about it that include numbers and possible workarounds.

But to summarise my findings is that how bad the join strategy is depends on the shape of the data. If you join one row in table A against one row in Table B, like your case here, there is no problem. It's also barely noticable when you load few entities or one of the loaded entities is very small.

In your case, as you are only looking for the top post, The only optimization I would look at is projecting the data so you don't load properties you possibly don't need. But Most likely anything you do will only be a few micro seconds.

Though, I know from a twitter conversation that this is a read only scenario. That makes it possible to add AsNoTracking() to the query which makes the dbcontext work less (this is an improvement to cpu and memory on the app server, not database).

So, measure it. I expect this to run in <1ms inside the db + some transfer time, and than there is not that much worth improving. Probably better to add caching.

UPDATE: reading more carefully again I realised i my head produced the wrong query plan and that you can probably improve the perf and reduce joins by moving the include to after the last .SelectMany(x => x.Posts) and change it to .Include(post => post.User) letting you load only the post and the user and no categories and topics. It will still join on these but no load the data.

UPDATE2: Example of how to write Query1 instead. I'm not sure if there is a difference but I expect it might reduce the data loaded. You will have to look in the profiler.

_context.Category .AsNoTracking() .Where(x => x.Id == categoryId) .SelectMany(x => x.Topics) .SelectMany(x => x.Posts) .Include(x => x.User) .OrderByDescending(x => x.DateCreated) .FirstOrDefault(); That should be pretty close to the optimal query if the query runs as I expect. As I said. You need to check the generated query to really know.

2
  • Hi Mikael, thanks for comment. What about query 1? In your blog post, you only cover one level of include. But if I was to say try to do a your suggestion of loading all collections and merge them in memory... Would this be your approach? – leen3o Sep 25 '14 at 5:25
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    You really don't need to go through all that trouble when loading a single entity. This will be really fast anyway. Check the new update for how I would write Q1 – Mikael Eliasson Sep 25 '14 at 7:04

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