158

I have a stash with an incorrect name. I would like to fix the name so it's accurate.

How can I rename a stash?

  • 5
    pop it and save it again with a different name? – Bartlomiej Lewandowski Sep 19 '14 at 11:54
  • 1
    Popping and stashing again isn't always an option, because the stash might be based on outdated state and result in conflicts when popping. (The outdated state does not even have to exist anywhere in the history anymore.) – Tom Nov 9 '18 at 11:58
197

Let's assume your stash list looks like this:

$ git stash list
stash@{0}: WIP on master: Add some very important feature 
stash@{1}: WIP on master: Fix some silly bug

First, you must remove stash entry which you want to rename:

$ git stash drop stash@{1}
Dropped stash@{1} (af8fdeee49a03d1b4609f294635e7f0d622e03db)

Now just add it again with new message using sha of commit returned after dropping:

$ git stash store -m "Very descriptive message" af8fdeee49a03d1b4609f294635e7f0d622e03db

And that's it:

$ git stash list
stash@{0}: Very descriptive message
stash@{1}: WIP on master: Add some very important feature

This solution requires git 1.8.4 or later, and yes, it works with dirty working directory too.

  • 1
    You meant git stash store. Indeed, it's a good improvement which avoids dealing with current changes. I'm updating my answer. – Julien Carsique Feb 22 '16 at 10:54
  • 2
    git show stash@{0} still shows the old information afterwards. How to fix that? (Please note that the stash then gets a different SHA.) – Tino Mar 8 '17 at 11:15
  • 4
    will git stash drop not lose the changes? – Shravya Boggarapu Jul 21 '17 at 13:27
  • 3
    @ShravyaBoggarapu, no, git doesn't remove commit until git gc is run. After stash drop you can easily find this normally inaccessible commit using git fsck | grep commit command. – qzb Jul 21 '17 at 14:14
  • 2
    @ÐerÆndi simply applying and saving is an easy option, but doesn't work when changes cannot be re-applied due to conflicts. Meanwhile dropping and storing works under any circumstances. I've tested my solution once again - it works just fine on latest git version (2.17.0). – qzb Apr 17 '18 at 13:11
59

Unless you do it manually or contribute an improvement to Git, you can use an alias:

git config --global alias.stash-rename '!_() { rev=$(git rev-parse $1) && git stash drop $1 || exit 1 ; git diff-index --quiet HEAD; s=$?; [ $s != 0 ] && git stash save "tmp stash from stash-rename"; git stash apply $rev && shift && git stash save "$@" && [ $s != 0 ] && git stash pop stash@{1}; }; _'

Usage: "git stash-rename <stash> [save options] [<message>]"

With [save options] any option of git stash save: [-p|--patch] [-k|--[no-]keep-index] [-q|--quiet] [-u|--include-untracked] [-a|--all]

Example:

$ git stash list
stash@{0}: On master: Pep8 format
stash@{1}: On master: co other than master with local changes
stash@{2}: On master: tests with deployAtEnd

# Let's say I want to rename the stash@{2} adding an issue reference:
$ git stash-rename stash@{2} NXP-13971-deployAtEnd

$ git stash list
stash@{0}: On master: NXP-13971-deployAtEnd
stash@{1}: On master: Pep8 format
stash@{2}: On master: co other than master with local changes

That will work even if you have local unstaged changes :)

EDIT 2016/02/22

Simplified script, credits to qzb, https://stackoverflow.com/a/35549615/515973

git config --global alias.stash-rename '!_() { rev=$(git rev-parse $1) && git stash drop $1 || exit 1 ; git stash store -m "$2" $rev; }; _'

Usage: "git stash-rename <stash> [<message>]"

  • 1
    Awesome! Even cooler if you could do git stash-rename 'tests with deployAtEnd' 'NXP-13971-deployAtEnd' – mikemaccana Sep 19 '14 at 14:27
  • 1
    @mikemaccana Easy with grep+awk. I'll update the answer in a few hours. – Julien Carsique Sep 19 '14 at 14:49
  • 3
    so the answer is 1) clean working copy, 2) apply stash you want to rename, 3) drop it from stash list, 4) create a new stash with the correct message. – gcb Dec 3 '14 at 23:20
  • 2
    To clarify, you are renaming the last stash, and after such action it becomes the top stash? – onebree Apr 20 '15 at 14:05
  • 2
    I delete the stash to rename, save current changes if any, recreate the deleted stash with the wanted name, reapply current changes if any. – Julien Carsique Apr 20 '15 at 22:33
3

I don't think it is possible to do so. There has been a proposal for stash renaming, but it has not been implemented yet.

My general idea is:

  1. Implement a new git reflog update command that updates the message associated with a specific reflog entry. To do this, a new update_reflog_ent() function (in reflog.c) would change the message associated with the specific reflog entry to update. An update_reflog() function would use for_each_reflog_ent() with update_reflog_ent to actually do the change.

  2. A git stash rename command would then only need to call git reflog update with the appropriate ref and new message.

Or you could, of course, pop the stash and do a git stash save [message]

3

For the benefit of the reader, here is an extension to the currently accepted and correct answer.

If you not only want to correct the stash message and also want to correct the commit message of the stash, such that

git stash list

and

git log --oneline -1 stash

both agree to what is shown, you need a bit more. There might be a better way to do it, but this recipe here is easy to understand, I hope.

To be able to do git commit --amend you need to be on the TIP of a branch. Hence the solution is:

git checkout -b scratch stash@{1}
git stash drop stash@{1}
git commit --amend -m "$MESSAGE"
git stash store -m "$MESSAGE" HEAD
git checkout master
git branch -D scratch

Explained:

  • Create a new (not yet existing) "scratch" branch from the "stash in question" and switch to it
  • Remove the old stash. This is safe, as we still have this on the branch.
  • Use git commit --amend to replace the commit message, this changing the SHA of the "stash in question"
  • Store the stash, based on the qzb's answer
  • Switch back (which assumes you came from "master") and cleanup

Drawbacks:

  • This switches branches temporarily. So this recipe can only be applied when git status --porcelain is clean (read: does not output anything)

  • It renumbers the stashes, so the changed stash becomes stash@{0}

  • You need to enter the $MESSAGE twice or use some environment variable (in the example: MESSAGE)

  • You need to find an unused branch name

There are ways to do this without switching branches, but this is beyond the scope of this answer.

Example

git init scratch
cd scratch
for a in A B C D; do date >$a; git add $a; git commit -m $a; done
for a in X Y; do echo $a > Z; git stash save --all; done
git log --oneline --graph --decorate --all; git stash list

Output

*-.   e0e281b (refs/stash) WIP on master: 8bdcc32 D
|\ \  
| | * 4d62f52 untracked files on master: 8bdcc32 D
| * 096f158 index on master: 8bdcc32 D
|/  
* 8bdcc32 (HEAD, master) D
* c84c659 C
* 49bb2da B
* b1852c6 A
stash@{0}: WIP on master: 8bdcc32 D
stash@{1}: WIP on master: 8bdcc32 D

Now without changing commit (note: the SHA in following will be different at your side):

git stash drop stash@{1}
git stash store -m ...changed... 2fbf9007dfdfb95ae269a19e13b8b9ca3e24181c
git log --oneline --graph --decorate --all; git stash list

Output

*-.   2fbf900 (refs/stash) WIP on master: 8bdcc32 D
|\ \  
| | * 246dc5c untracked files on master: 8bdcc32 D
| * 80c5ea0 index on master: 8bdcc32 D
|/  
* 8bdcc32 (HEAD, master) D
* c84c659 C
* 49bb2da B
* b1852c6 A
stash@{0}: ...changed...
stash@{1}: WIP on master: 8bdcc32 D

As you can see, stash@{0} still is shown as 2fbf900 (refs/stash) WIP on master: 8bdcc32 D in git log. If you look carefully, you will see, that several commits have changed SHA. This is due to how stashes are handled (parents are included of the SHA, and stashes have their stashes as parent).

Fix that:

git checkout -b scratch stash
git stash drop
git commit --amend -m ...changed...
git stash store -m ...changed... HEAD
git checkout master
git branch -D scratch
git log --oneline --graph --decorate --all; git stash list

Output

*-.   4d55186 (refs/stash) ...changed...
|\ \  
| | * 246dc5c untracked files on master: 8bdcc32 D
| * 80c5ea0 index on master: 8bdcc32 D
|/  
* 8bdcc32 (HEAD, master) D
* c84c659 C
* 49bb2da B
* b1852c6 A
stash@{0}: ...changed...
stash@{1}: WIP on master: 8bdcc32 D

As you also can see, refs/stash has a changed SHA, too.

  • Worth mention: this destroys the index that was saved with the original stash, replacing it with a new index that matches the parent commit of the original stash. If one wasn't planning to use the original saved index (or it already matched the parent of the original stash), this is not a problem. – torek Jun 1 at 20:17
1

It's very simple. First, undo the last stash with:

git stash pop

After this, yo can save the stash with a customized name in this way:

git stash save "your explanatory name"

I hope it useful for you. :)

  • The renamed stash may not be the most recent. – mikemaccana Mar 28 at 13:53
0

Here is a modified version of Julien's alias that lets you properly deal with the On <branch> prefix usually prepended to stash names:

git config --global alias.stash-rename '!_() { newmsg="$1" && stash=${2:-"stash@{0}"} && newbranch="$3" && sha=$(git rev-parse "$stash") && olddesc="$(git stash list --format=%gs -1 "$stash")" && newdesc="$(if [[ "$newbranch" = "." ]]; then echo "$newmsg"; else if [[ -n "$newbranch" ]]; then echo "On $newbranch: $newmsg"; else if [[ "$olddesc" =~ ":" ]]; then echo "$(echo "$olddesc" | cut -f1 -d":"): $newmsg"; else echo "$newmsg"; fi; fi; fi)" && git stash drop "$stash" > /dev/null || exit 1; git stash store -m "$newdesc" "$sha" && git stash list; }; _'

Syntax:

git stash-rename <new-name> [<stash> [<new-branch-name> | .]]

Example usage:

repo[master] % touch tmp && git add tmp && git stash save first
Saved working directory and index state On master: first
HEAD is now at bd62064 Initial commit
repo[master] % touch tmp && git add tmp && git stash save second
Saved working directory and index state On master: second
HEAD is now at bd62064 Initial commit
repo[master] % git stash list
stash@{0}: On master: second
stash@{1}: On master: first
repo[master] % git stash-rename renamed
stash@{0}: On master: renamed
stash@{1}: On master: first
repo[master] % git stash-rename also-renamed stash@{1}
stash@{0}: On master: also-renamed
stash@{1}: On master: renamed
repo[master] % git stash-rename branch-changed stash@{0} new-branch
stash@{0}: On new-branch: branch-changed
stash@{1}: On master: renamed
repo[master] % git stash-rename branch-name-persists
stash@{0}: On new-branch: branch-name-persists
stash@{1}: On master: renamed
repo[master] % git stash-rename no-branch stash@{0} .
stash@{0}: no-branch
stash@{1}: On master: renamed
repo[master] % git stash-rename renamed
stash@{0}: renamed
stash@{1}: On master: renamed
repo[master] % git stash-rename readd-branch stash@{0} develop
stash@{0}: On develop: readd-branch
stash@{1}: On master: renamed

Most of the command is for parsing the arguments and figuring out what should be done to the branch name. The git tools used are as follows:

  • git rev-parse <stash> to find the SHA of the stash.
  • git stash list --format=%gs -1 <stash> to find the reflog subject of the stash. Note that this is different from the commit message of the stash, which is not changed by this command. The reflog subject is what shows up in git stash list, and you can change the reflog subject without changing the hashes of the commits associated with the stashes. However, you can always find the original commit message, so don't use git stash-rename to remove sensitive information!
  • git stash drop <stash> to drop the old reference to the stash (but we still have the SHA, so it's not lost).
  • git stash store -m <new-message> <sha> to save a new reference to the stash with the same commit information but a different reflog subject.
  • git stash list to list the stashes after the operation is finished. Note that new stashes are always pushed to the beginning of the list. It would be necessary to re-push all the stashes before the stash of interest in order to restore its original position.
0

Simplest way: pop your stash with git stash pop then save it again with git stash save your-name

  • The renamed stash may not be the most recent. – mikemaccana Mar 28 at 13:54

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