27

I have a React Class that's going to an API to get content. I've confirmed the data is coming back, but it's not re-rendering:

var DealsList = React.createClass({
  getInitialState: function() {
    return { deals: [] };
  },
  componentDidMount: function() {
    this.loadDealsFromServer();
  },
  loadDealsFromServer: function() {
    var newDeals = [];

    chrome.runtime.sendMessage({ action: "findDeals", personId: this.props.person.id }, function(deals) {
      newDeals = deals;
    });

    this.setState({ deals: newDeals });
  },
  render: function() {
    var dealNodes = this.state.deals.map(function(deal, index) {
      return (
        <Deal deal={deal} key={index} />
      );
    });
    return (
      <div className="deals">
        <table>
          <thead>
            <tr>
              <td>Name</td>
              <td>Amount</td>
              <td>Stage</td>
              <td>Probability</td>
              <td>Status</td>
              <td>Exp. Close</td>
            </tr>
          </thead>
          <tbody>
            {dealNodes}
          </tbody>
        </table>
      </div>
    );
  }
});

However, if I add a debugger like below, newDeals are populated, and then once I continue, i see the data:

  loadDealsFromServer: function() {
    var newDeals = [];

    chrome.runtime.sendMessage({ action: "findDeals", personId: this.props.person.id }, function(deals) {
      newDeals = deals;
    });
    debugger
    this.setState({ deals: newDeals });
  },

This is what's calling deals list:

var Gmail = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    return (
      <div className="main">
        <div className="panel">
          <DealsList person={this.props.person} />
        </div>
      </div>
    );
  }
});
14

That's because the response from chrome.runtime.sendMessage is asynchronous; here's the order of operations:

var newDeals = [];

// (1) first chrome.runtime.sendMessage is called, and *registers a callback*
// so that when the data comes back *in the future*
// the function will be called
chrome.runtime.sendMessage({...}, function(deals) {
  // (3) sometime in the future, this function runs,
  // but it's too late
  newDeals = deals;
});

// (2) this is called immediately, `newDeals` is an empty array
this.setState({ deals: newDeals });

When you pause the script with the debugger, you're giving the extension time to call the callback; by the time you continue, the data has arrived and it appears to work.

To fix, you want to do the setState call after the data comes back from the Chrome extension:

var newDeals = [];

// (1) first chrome.runtime.sendMessage is called, and *registers a callback*
// so that when the data comes back *in the future*
// the function will be called
chrome.runtime.sendMessage({...}, function(deals) {
  // (2) sometime in the future, this function runs
  newDeals = deals;

  // (3) now you can call `setState` with the data
  this.setState({ deals: newDeals });
}.bind(this)); // Don't forget to bind(this) (or use an arrow function)

[Edit]

If this doesn't work for you, check out the other answers on this question, which explain other reasons your component might not be updating.

  • Duh! I should've known this was the case when the debugger line fixed it. The bind(this) was the thing I missed when I first attempted this. Thanks, great detailed comment! – brandonhilkert Sep 19 '14 at 15:54
53

I'd like to add to this the enormously simple, but oh so easily made mistake of writing:

this.state.something = 'changed';

... and then not understanding why it's not rendering and Googling and coming on this page, only to realize that you should have written:

this.setState({something: 'changed'});

React only triggers a re-render if you use setState to update the state.

  • This is the exact issue I was having. It's strange that they don't throw a warning since they throw one when trying to update props. – AndrewJM Dec 13 '15 at 22:38
  • 2
    @AndrewJM They can't throw a warning. They could if you'd write this.state = 'something' because you would be hitting the setter for state, but in the example above, the code hits the getter, which returns an object and it then ends up setting a field on an object that is only a copy of the state. – Stijn de Witt Jun 23 '17 at 21:37
12

Another oh-so-easy mistake, which was the source of the problem for me: I’d written my own shouldComponentUpdate method, which didn’t check the new state change I’d added.

4

In my case, I was calling this.setState({}) correctly, but I my function wasn't bound to this, so it wasn't working. Adding .bind(this) to the function call or doing this.foo = this.foo.bind(this) in the constructor fixed it.

1

I was going through same issue in React-Native where API response & reject weren't updating states

apiCall().then(function(resp) { this.setState({data: resp}) // wasn't updating }

I solved the problem by changing function with the arrow function

apiCall().then((resp) => {
    this.setState({data: resp}) // rendering the view as expected
}

For me, it was a binding issue. Using arrow functions solved it because arrow function doesn't create its's own this, its always bounded to its outer context where it comes from

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.