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Take this Picture for example: enter image description here

**Ignore the ISA relationship as I understand that concept.

My question is with creating the table for Team. I understand how to create tables for entities, and for relationships but I'm getting a little confused with how I should go about creating the table for Team which has two relationship sets being related to it.

My possible Solution: Team holds the attributes SSN(from professors) and SSN(from GTAs, which comes from it's ISA) and I use the PRIMARY KEY(profssn, gtassn) to uniquely identify Teams? If I do this, how would I successfully model on_team_1 and on_team_2? I thought about having on_team_1 have the attributes SSN(since its the primary key of professors) and then two attributes such as team_profssn and team_gtassn which come from the Team entity.

Does this sound viable or am I completely missing how to do this?

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I think you need to have a TEAM table which holds attributes specific to the team (NAME, a least), then it seems you need a TEAM_MEMBER table which models the relationship between an individual and a particular team. If I understand your data I think that TEAM_MEMBER would just have TEAM_NAME and SSN - although in what is euphemistically known as "the real world" there's no way in hell you'd get away with using SSN for anything like this. For example, in our systems (large international retailer) any Personally Identifiable Data (PID) is buried so deep that most systems, including those I work on, quite literally CANNOT see any such data. I suggest that unless your design is already laser-etched in titanium you shouldn't use SSN for anything - generate a unique value for 'person ID' using a sequence instead.

CREATE TABLE TEAM
 (TEAM_NAME  VARCHAR2(50)
    CONSTRAINT PK_TEAM
      PRIMARY KEY
      USING INDEX);

CREATE TABLE TEAM_MEMBER
 (TEAM_NAME  VARCHAR2(50)
    CONSTRAINT TEAM_MEMBER_FK1
      REFERENCES TEAM(TEAM_NAME),
  PERSON_ID  NUMBER,
  CONSTRAINT PK_TEAM_MEMBER
    PRIMARY KEY(TEAM, PERSON_ID)
    USING INDEX);

Best of luck.

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