45

I am trying to write a bulk upsert in python using the SQLAlchemy module (not in SQL!).

I am getting the following error on a SQLAlchemy add:

sqlalchemy.exc.IntegrityError: (IntegrityError) duplicate key value violates unique constraint "posts_pkey"
DETAIL:  Key (id)=(TEST1234) already exists.

I have a table called posts with a primary key on the id column.

In this example, I already have a row in the db with id=TEST1234. When I attempt to db.session.add() a new posts object with the id set to TEST1234, I get the error above. I was under the impression that if the primary key already exists, the record would get updated.

How can I upsert with Flask-SQLAlchemy based on primary key alone? Is there a simple solution?

If there is not, I can always check for and delete any record with a matching id, and then insert the new record, but that seems expensive for my situation, where I do not expect many updates.

1
  • 6
    How is that duplicate if original question doesn't mention SQLAlchemy? – techkuz Feb 25 '19 at 15:23
34

There is an upsert-esque operation in SQLAlchemy:

db.session.merge()

After I found this command, I was able to perform upserts, but it is worth mentioning that this operation is slow for a bulk "upsert".

The alternative is to get a list of the primary keys you would like to upsert, and query the database for any matching ids:

# Imagine that post1, post5, and post1000 are posts objects with ids 1, 5 and 1000 respectively
# The goal is to "upsert" these posts.
# we initialize a dict which maps id to the post object

my_new_posts = {1: post1, 5: post5, 1000: post1000} 

for each in posts.query.filter(posts.id.in_(my_new_posts.keys())).all():
    # Only merge those posts which already exist in the database
    db.session.merge(my_new_posts.pop(each.id))

# Only add those posts which did not exist in the database 
db.session.add_all(my_new_posts.values())

# Now we commit our modifications (merges) and inserts (adds) to the database!
db.session.commit()
4
  • 9
    merge do not handle intigirtyError – Manoj Sahu Feb 4 '16 at 12:02
  • 2
    the above process in very slow, cant use it – Manoj Sahu Feb 4 '16 at 12:03
  • 4
    Merge doesn't help if you catch duplicate key error on unique index it works only for primary keys – Zaytsev Dmitry Mar 28 '19 at 17:08
  • 7
    merge don't got no tegridy – deed02392 Aug 14 '19 at 21:45
10

You can leverage the on_conflict_do_update variant. A simple example would be the following:

from sqlalchemy.dialects.postgresql import insert

class Post(Base):
    """
    A simple class for demonstration
    """

    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    title = Column(Unicode)

# Prepare all the values that should be "upserted" to the DB
values = [
    {"id": 1, "title": "mytitle 1"},
    {"id": 2, "title": "mytitle 2"},
    {"id": 3, "title": "mytitle 3"},
    {"id": 4, "title": "mytitle 4"},
]

stmt = insert(Post).values(values)
stmt = stmt.on_conflict_do_update(
    # Let's use the constraint name which was visible in the original posts error msg
    constraint="post_pkey",

    # The columns that should be updated on conflict
    set_={
        "title": stmt.excluded.title
    }
)
session.execute(stmt)

See the PG docs for more details (f.ex. where the "excluded" term comes from).

Side-Note on duplicated column names

The above code uses the column names as dict keys both in the values list and the argument to set_. If the column-name is changed in the class-definition this needs to be changed everywhere or it will break. This can be avoided by accessing the column definitions, making the code a bit uglier, but more robust:

coldefs = Post.__table__.c

values = [
    {coldefs.id.name: 1, coldefs.title.name: "mytitlte 1"},
    ...
]

stmt = stmt.on_conflict_do_update(
    ...
    set_={
        coldefs.title.name: stmt.excluded.title
        ...
    }
)
3
  • My constraint="post_pkey" code is failing because sqlalchemy can't find the unique constraint which I created in raw sql CREATE UNIQUE INDEX post_pkey... and then loaded into sqlalchemy with metadata.reflect(eng, only="my_table") after which I received a warning base.py:3515: SAWarning: Skipped unsupported reflection of expression-based index post_pkey Any tips for how to fix? – user1071182 Oct 30 '20 at 4:45
  • @user1071182 I think it would be better to post this as a separate question. It would allow you to add more detail. Without seeing the full CREATE INDEX statement it is hard to guess what's going wrong here. I can't promise anything though because I have not yet worked with partial indices with SQLAlchemy. But maybe someone else might have a solution. – exhuma Oct 30 '20 at 11:46
  • This is the cleanest solution for the problem! – William Griffin Mar 4 at 4:14
3

An alternative approach using compilation extension (https://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/13/core/compiler.html):

from sqlalchemy.ext.compiler import compiles
from sqlalchemy.sql.expression import Insert

@compiles(Insert)
def compile_upsert(insert_stmt, compiler, **kwargs):
    """
    converts every SQL insert to an upsert  i.e;
    INSERT INTO test (foo, bar) VALUES (1, 'a')
    becomes:
    INSERT INTO test (foo, bar) VALUES (1, 'a') ON CONFLICT(foo) DO UPDATE SET (bar = EXCLUDED.bar)
    (assuming foo is a primary key)
    :param insert_stmt: Original insert statement
    :param compiler: SQL Compiler
    :param kwargs: optional arguments
    :return: upsert statement
    """
    pk = insert_stmt.table.primary_key
    insert = compiler.visit_insert(insert_stmt, **kwargs)
    ondup = f'ON CONFLICT ({",".join(c.name for c in pk)}) DO UPDATE SET'
    updates = ', '.join(f"{c.name}=EXCLUDED.{c.name}" for c in insert_stmt.table.columns)
    upsert = ' '.join((insert, ondup, updates))
    return upsert

This should ensure that all insert statements behave as upserts. This implementation is in Postgres dialect, but it should be fairly easy to modify for MySQL dialect.

4
  • 1
    Getting this error when using that snippet: sqlalchemy.exc.ProgrammingError: (psycopg2.errors.SyntaxError) syntax error at or near ")" LINE 1: ...on) VALUES ('US^WYOMING^ALBANY', '') ON CONFLICT () DO UPDAT... – Mark Coletti Jun 29 '20 at 16:25
  • Ah nice catch! If you don’t have a primary key in your table, this wouldn’t work. Let me add a fix. – danielcahall Jul 2 '20 at 21:36
  • actually, I'm not sure why you would need this if you didn't have a primary key - could you elaborate on the problem? – danielcahall Jul 2 '20 at 22:12
  • Converting all inserts into upserts is risky. Sometimes you need to get integrity errors for data consistency and to avoid accidental overwrites. I would only use this solution if you are 120% aware of all the implications this has! – exhuma Jul 31 '20 at 10:07
0

This is not the safest method, but it is very simple and very fast. I was just trying to selectively overwrite a portion of a table. I deleted the known rows that I knew would conflict and then I appended the new rows from a pandas dataframe. Your pandas dataframe column names will need to match your sql table column names.

eng = create_engine('postgresql://...')
conn = eng.connect()

conn.execute("DELETE FROM my_table WHERE col = %s", val)
df.to_sql('my_table', con=eng, if_exists='append')
0

I started looking at this and I think I've found a pretty efficient way to do upserts in sqlalchemy with a mix of bulk_insert_mappings and bulk_update_mappings instead of merge.

import time
import sqlite3

from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
from sqlalchemy import Column, Integer, String, create_engine
from sqlalchemy.orm import scoped_session, sessionmaker
from contextlib import contextmanager


engine = None
Session = sessionmaker()
Base = declarative_base()


def creat_new_database(db_name="sqlite:///bulk_upsert_sqlalchemy.db"):
    global engine
    engine = create_engine(db_name, echo=False)
    local_session = scoped_session(Session)
    local_session.remove()
    local_session.configure(bind=engine, autoflush=False, expire_on_commit=False)
    Base.metadata.drop_all(engine)
    Base.metadata.create_all(engine)


@contextmanager
def db_session():
    local_session = scoped_session(Session)
    session = local_session()

    session.expire_on_commit = False

    try:
        yield session
    except BaseException:
        session.rollback()
        raise
    finally:
        session.close()


class Customer(Base):
    __tablename__ = "customer"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String(255))


def bulk_upsert_mappings(customers):

    entries_to_update = []
    entries_to_put = []
    with db_session() as sess:
        t0 = time.time()

        # Find all customers that needs to be updated and build mappings
        for each in (
            sess.query(Customer.id).filter(Customer.id.in_(customers.keys())).all()
        ):
            customer = customers.pop(each.id)
            entries_to_update.append({"id": customer["id"], "name": customer["name"]})

        # Bulk mappings for everything that needs to be inserted
        for customer in customers.values():
            entries_to_put.append({"id": customer["id"], "name": customer["name"]})

        sess.bulk_insert_mappings(Customer, entries_to_put)
        sess.bulk_update_mappings(Customer, entries_to_update)
        sess.commit()

    print(
        "Total time for upsert with MAPPING update "
        + str(len(customers))
        + " records "
        + str(time.time() - t0)
        + " sec"
        + " inserted : "
        + str(len(entries_to_put))
        + " - updated : "
        + str(len(entries_to_update))
    )


def bulk_upsert_merge(customers):

    entries_to_update = 0
    entries_to_put = []
    with db_session() as sess:
        t0 = time.time()

        # Find all customers that needs to be updated and merge
        for each in (
            sess.query(Customer.id).filter(Customer.id.in_(customers.keys())).all()
        ):
            values = customers.pop(each.id)
            sess.merge(Customer(id=values["id"], name=values["name"]))
            entries_to_update += 1

        # Bulk mappings for everything that needs to be inserted
        for customer in customers.values():
            entries_to_put.append({"id": customer["id"], "name": customer["name"]})

        sess.bulk_insert_mappings(Customer, entries_to_put)
        sess.commit()

    print(
        "Total time for upsert with MERGE update "
        + str(len(customers))
        + " records "
        + str(time.time() - t0)
        + " sec"
        + " inserted : "
        + str(len(entries_to_put))
        + " - updated : "
        + str(entries_to_update)
    )


if __name__ == "__main__":

    batch_size = 10000

    # Only inserts
    customers_insert = {
        i: {"id": i, "name": "customer_" + str(i)} for i in range(batch_size)
    }

    # 50/50 inserts update
    customers_upsert = {
        i: {"id": i, "name": "customer_2_" + str(i)}
        for i in range(int(batch_size / 2), batch_size + int(batch_size / 2))
    }

    creat_new_database()
    bulk_upsert_mappings(customers_insert.copy())
    bulk_upsert_mappings(customers_upsert.copy())
    bulk_upsert_mappings(customers_insert.copy())

    creat_new_database()
    bulk_upsert_merge(customers_insert.copy())
    bulk_upsert_merge(customers_upsert.copy())
    bulk_upsert_merge(customers_insert.copy())

The results for the benchmark:

Total time for upsert with MAPPING: 0.17138004302978516 sec inserted : 10000 - updated : 0
Total time for upsert with MAPPING: 0.22074174880981445 sec inserted : 5000 - updated : 5000
Total time for upsert with MAPPING: 0.22307634353637695 sec inserted : 0 - updated : 10000
Total time for upsert with MERGE: 0.1724097728729248 sec inserted : 10000 - updated : 0
Total time for upsert with MERGE: 7.852903842926025 sec inserted : 5000 - updated : 5000
Total time for upsert with MERGE: 15.11970829963684 sec inserted : 0 - updated : 10000

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